Back cycling

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Bill, Apr 18, 2003.

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  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    18 months ago I bought a Dawes Giro 300, rode it a couple of times then left it in the shed. I have
    now developed arthritis in my knees and hips. "Get an exercise bike" my physio advised. "I can do
    better than that" I told him. So, I fished out the bike, cleaned and oiled it, new battery in the
    Cateye, bought all the fancy gear, then waited for the weather to improve. Went out this morning and
    did 10 miles. Took me 40 minutes, but I did stop and have a sit down on the side of the road for a
    rest. Whilst sitting there, two cars stopped and asked me if I was OK. I live in the wilds of East
    Suffolk, and was down a narrow lane, so I suppose an overweight cyclist, dressed like a parrot,
    sitting in the hedge isn't an everyday sight. The only problem with wearing cycling gear is that
    people expect you to ride like a racing cyclist.

    Now my quads have ceased to function. When I stand up there is a point that I am very wobbly. Let's
    hope they recover by tonight as I have to go to work.

    I really enjoyed the ride. I have a real incentive now (reduction in pain levels) to get out and get
    fitter, lose some weight and get a bit of muscle tone in my legs again. Can any of you "proper"
    cyclists advise me how often I should ride initially. Should I try and ride daily, or leave a
    recovery period, say every other day. I'm not interested in racing, I just want to use the bike as a
    fitness aid.

    Bill
     
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  2. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I really enjoyed the ride. I have a real incentive now (reduction in pain levels) to get out and
    > get fitter, lose some weight and get a bit of
    muscle
    > tone in my legs again. Can any of you "proper" cyclists advise me how
    often
    > I should ride initially. Should I try and ride daily, or leave a recovery period, say every other
    > day. I'm not interested in racing, I just want to use the bike as a fitness aid.

    Hello Bill. You don't say how old you are or if you commute to work. If you are over 40 (like me)
    and have had a couple of decades or more off the bike, you need to take things step by step. If you
    did 10 miles in 40 minutes then that's an average of 15 mph, which is more than respectable.
    However, if you *had* to stop for a breather, you might have been overdoing it.

    Try using your bike to get your morning papers or post a letter. A few miles a day will soon add up
    and you'll be able to build up you stamina so you can tackle distances like 20 miles with ease.
    Good luck. Have a look at this site.

    http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/index.htm
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  3. I had a similar issue. I was a keen cyclists but developed back and knee Injuries - so I stopped.
    But the back and knee problems got worse - with hindsight a lack of activity made things worse not
    better. The bigs that helped me and may may wish to consider

    1. Get your feet checked by a podiatirists. If your feet don't hit the ground flat - the symptons
    can be knee, back and hip pain (your GP will probably tell it is wera and tear or athritus) - A
    good podiatrist will fit you with some insoles - and the results are pretty dramatic.

    2. Make sure your bike fits. I went for a bio racer profile - this gives you the ideal bike setup to
    the mm - it has its critics - but this really helped
    me.

    Other than that I did a 17 mile loop - staying off the big chainring - and use the low the gears. If
    you have click in pedals really practice pulling on the up strokes - this reduces the stress on your
    news - and gives you more speed. I stuck at this weekly loop for about eight weeks - then increased
    the distance - anytime I got a reaction - I went back to the 17 mile loop .............Three years
    later I am up to Fifty - and have treated myself to a new bike !

    HRM and Computers are good for keeping motivated.

    If you want more info contact me at

    [email protected](removethis)virgin.net

    Pete.

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > 18 months ago I bought a Dawes Giro 300, rode it a couple of times then
    left
    > it in the shed. I have now developed arthritis in my knees and hips.
    "Get
    > an exercise bike" my physio advised. "I can do better than that" I told him. So, I fished out the
    > bike, cleaned and oiled it, new battery in the Cateye, bought all the fancy gear, then waited for
    > the weather to improve. Went out this morning and did 10 miles. Took me 40 minutes, but I did
    stop
    > and have a sit down on the side of the road for a rest. Whilst sitting there, two cars stopped and
    > asked me if I was OK. I live in the wilds of East Suffolk, and was down a narrow lane, so I
    > suppose an overweight cyclist, dressed like a parrot, sitting in the hedge isn't an everyday
    > sight. The only problem with wearing cycling gear is that people expect
    you
    > to ride like a racing cyclist.
    >
    > Now my quads have ceased to function. When I stand up there is a point
    that
    > I am very wobbly. Let's hope they recover by tonight as I have to go to work.
    >
    > I really enjoyed the ride. I have a real incentive now (reduction in pain levels) to get out and
    > get fitter, lose some weight and get a bit of
    muscle
    > tone in my legs again. Can any of you "proper" cyclists advise me how
    often
    > I should ride initially. Should I try and ride daily, or leave a recovery period, say every other
    > day. I'm not interested in racing, I just want to use the bike as a fitness aid.
    >
    > Bill
     
  4. Chilly

    Chilly Guest

    Simon Mason <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I really enjoyed the ride. I have a real incentive now (reduction in
    pain
    > > levels) to get out and get fitter, lose some weight and get a bit of
    > muscle
    > > tone in my legs again. Can any of you "proper" cyclists advise me how
    > often
    > > I should ride initially. Should I try and ride daily, or leave a
    recovery
    > > period, say every other day. I'm not interested in racing, I just want
    to
    > > use the bike as a fitness aid.
    >
    > Hello Bill. You don't say how old you are or if you commute to work. If
    you
    > are over 40 (like me) and have had a couple of decades or more off the
    bike,
    > you need to take things step by step. If you did 10 miles in 40 minutes
    then
    > that's an average of 15 mph, which is more than respectable. However, if
    you
    > *had* to stop for a breather, you might have been overdoing it.

    My fingers on the keyboard lied. That should have been 50 minutes, not 40! If I could do 10 in 40,
    and have a break, I wouldn't be worrying about fitness......

    Even so, I probably did overcook it a bit. The route I chose only had one hill, not steep but quite
    long. It was at the top I had a rest. I don't commute to work yet as it is dark when I go
    (nightworker), and I don't fancy the road in the dark, it's a bit narrow, twisty and totally unlit.

    My quads have recovered, and I'm looking forward to my next outing.

    bill
     
  5. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Chilly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... I don't
    > commute to work yet as it is dark when I go (nightworker), and I don't
    fancy
    > the road in the dark, it's a bit narrow, twisty and totally unlit.

    I don't commute by bike when I'm on nights either. Not because of the dark (I bike home after
    afternoons at 2200) but after working 2200 - 0700 the last thing I want to do is to ride home
    12 miles :)
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  6. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 12:30:03 +0100, "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I suppose an overweight cyclist, dressed like a parrot, sitting in the hedge isn't an
    >everyday sight.

    That depends on just how much like a parrot you dressed, and how high up in the hedge you
    were perching.

    "Oh look dear, there's a cyclist dressed as a parrot. He looks dead, shall we pull over ?"

    'Don't think so darling, he's just shagged out after a long squawk'

    >The only problem with wearing cycling gear is that people expect you to ride like a racing cyclist.

    You need the Bristol Bike Ride. Several thousand people dust their bikes off for the one day in a
    year they ever use them, then set off for 40 miles to Clevedon and back. It's lycra-clad carnage
    out there :cool:
     
  7. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 18:00:29 +0100, "Chilly" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> HRM and Computers are good for keeping motivated.
    >
    >OK, I give up, what's HRM ;-)

    Heart rate monitor.

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  8. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 18:00:29 +0100, "Chilly" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >OK, I give up, what's HRM ;-)
    >

    His Royal Masonness?

    Hello! Reckless Motor-car? ... quickly followed by ... Hell! Ruddy Medial-ligament?

    Heart-rate monitor?

    James

    --
    "Watch the kite, not where you're going!"
     
  9. > I earn six quid an hour in a care home. I have to make do with what I
    have
    > got. There are lots of things that would be beneficial, but are out of my reach. I am comfortable
    > on my Dawes, so assume the fit can't be all that much out.
    > >

    A profile only costs £35 - or a decent bike shop will check out your set up for next to nothing. I
    tweaked my existing set up very cheaply - A longer stem, adjusting the saddle - made hell of a
    difference.

    Anyway stick at it and good luck.

    Pete.
     
  10. Firstly - welcome back to cycling!

    Enjoy the cycling - slow & steady - take as many stops/breathers as you want/need. Keep hydrated
    before, during and after a ride. Don't use too high a gear or you'll stress those knee joints. Eat
    sensibly. Recover between rides - recovery time is just as important as cycling time. You may well
    need to have a day off cycling between rides at first.

    Most of all - enjoy.

    Cheers, helen s

    p.s. Sounds like you are serious cyclist already as you have the parrot look. My personal look is
    that of a giant genetically modified fluorescent yellow gob-stopper touring the lanes of
    Norfolk ;-)

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  11. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    >
    > p.s. Sounds like you are serious cyclist already as you have the parrot
    look.
    > My personal look is that of a giant genetically modified fluorescent
    yellow
    > gob-stopper touring the lanes of Norfolk ;-)

    At least you can blend in with all the Norwich City fans ;-) Simom
     
  12. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    "Bill" <[email protected]> of ntlworld News Service wrote:
    >Can any of you "proper" cyclists advise me how often I should ride initially. Should I try and ride
    >daily, or leave a recovery period, say every other day. I'm not interested in racing, I just want
    >to use the bike as a fitness aid.
    Another returned cyclist here. I'd say listen to your body. If it's tired, have a rest day. I've
    increased my weekly distance from 7 miles to 75 in about 8 weeks by cycling daily except Saturdays.
    My pattern of rest and cycling days is dominated by the need to get to work, so I tend to give
    myself Saturdays as a rest day before having a longer ride on Sundays. I haven't usually felt the
    need of a rest day otherwise, so my weekday distances are fairly even when the weather is good. But
    if a day on and then a day off works for you, then do that.
    --
    Government is an association of men who do violence to the rest of us. - Leo Tolstoy Steph Peters
    delete invalid from [email protected] Tatting, lace & stitching page
    <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm
     
  13. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Andy Dingley wrote:
    > You need the Bristol Bike Ride. Several thousand people dust their bikes off for the one day in a
    > year they ever use them, then set off for 40 miles to Clevedon and back. It's lycra-clad carnage
    > out there :cool:

    And there's finally a date for this year's ride - 15 June:
    http://www.bristol-city.gov.uk/tourism/bbr_index.html

    I shall only be doing the 8 mile ride this year, since I'll have the family with me. By the time
    we've ridden to the centre of Bristol before the ride and back home afterwards we'll have done about
    30 miles, which is a long way for Catherine and is also quite a bit further than I've yet towed
    Jenny's trailer.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  14. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    I wrote:
    > And there's finally a date for this year's ride - 15 June:
    > http://www.bristol-city.gov.uk/tourism/bbr_index.html

    Bugger! I've just realised that's the same day as the HPV racing at Castle Combe.

    I hadn't planned to ride at Castle Combe, but we all enjoyed watching it last year and had intended
    to go again. I guess we'll just have to go to the Andover event on 3 May instead.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  15. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 23:48:43 +0100, "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Bugger! I've just realised that's the same day as the HPV racing at Castle Combe.

    I've just realised it's the day before a museum geek conference in Florence. 8-(
     
  16. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Simon Mason <[email protected]> writes

    > Try using your bike to get your morning papers or post a letter. A few
    > miles a day will soon add up and you'll be able to build up you stamina

    I'd have to start reading real newspapers, as opposed to the online versions, and writing letters
    rather than emails to benefit that way.

    The last time I posted a letter, must have been a couple of months ago, it took me only a few yards
    out of my way. Luckily, I was cycling five miles to work at the time.

    --
    congokid Eating out in London? Read my tips... http://congokid.com
     
  17. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    congokid <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Simon Mason <[email protected]> writes
    >
    > > Try using your bike to get your morning papers or post a letter. A few
    > > miles a day will soon add up and you'll be able to build up you stamina
    >
    > I'd have to start reading real newspapers, as opposed to the online versions, and writing letters
    > rather than emails to benefit that way.
    >
    > The last time I posted a letter, must have been a couple of months ago, it took me only a few
    > yards out of my way. Luckily, I was cycling five miles to work at the time.

    You can't have many bills to pay then ;-) Simon
     
  18. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On 21 Apr 2003 16:59:37 -0700, [email protected] (Simon Mason) wrote:

    >> The last time I posted a letter, must have been a couple of months ago, it took me only a few
    >> yards out of my way. Luckily, I was cycling five miles to work at the time.
    >
    > You can't have many bills to pay then ;-)

    Bills? Post?

    You mean some people don't pay all their bills online nowadays? How queer....

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  19. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Simon Mason <[email protected]> writes
    >congokid <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Simon Mason <[email protected]> writes
    >>
    >> > Try using your bike to get your morning papers or post a letter. A few
    >> > miles a day will soon add up and you'll be able to build up you stamina
    >>
    >> I'd have to start reading real newspapers, as opposed to the online versions, and writing letters
    >> rather than emails to benefit that way.
    >>
    >> The last time I posted a letter, must have been a couple of months ago, it took me only a few
    >> yards out of my way. Luckily, I was cycling five miles to work at the time.
    >
    > You can't have many bills to pay then ;-)

    More than I care to think about, but all the utilities and subscriptions are paid by direct debit,
    and credit and store cards I do by internet banking.

    My cheque book is now six years old. The first cheque was written January 24, 1997, and the last was
    January 3 this year. There were 25 to begin with and I still have five left.

    --
    congokid Eating out in London? Read my tips... http://congokid.com
     
  20. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Call me Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 21 Apr 2003 16:59:37 -0700, [email protected] (Simon Mason) wrote:
    >
    > >> The last time I posted a letter, must have been a couple of months ago, it took me only a few
    > >> yards out of my way. Luckily, I was cycling five miles to work at the time.
    > >
    > > You can't have many bills to pay then ;-)
    >
    > Bills? Post?
    >
    > You mean some people don't pay all their bills online nowadays? How queer....
    >
    >
    > Bob
    > --
    Indeed...and there's the rub (whatever that might mean!!). An unfortunate side effect of the IT age
    is that it really does make life easier. As a result, we all have to think of ways to make it harder
    again, just to stay in shape !...ain't life great ?? Dave.
     
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