back issues of `Ride' - Issues 14 and 17

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by David Pascoe, Nov 13, 2003.

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  1. David Pascoe

    David Pascoe Guest

    I'm interested in finding out what Ride magazine had to say about a Trek 5500 (Issue 17) and a Trek
    2300 (Issue 14). Their reviews are normally pretty well written.

    Does anyone have back issues they can summarise ?

    www.ridemedia.com.au just has the covers.

    thanks, davidp.
    --
    David Pascoe, [email protected], Western Australia
     
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  2. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "David Pascoe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I'm interested in finding out what Ride magazine had to say about a Trek
    5500
    > (Issue 17) and a Trek 2300 (Issue 14). Their reviews are normally pretty
    well
    > written.
    >
    > Does anyone have back issues they can summarise ?

    I have 17: Trek 5500: Assume rough quotage:

    - Anyone can purchase the same bike as used by US Postal
    - Geometry of the frame is fairly standard
    - The carbon fibre lends itself to a degree of comfort being light, stiff, yet compliant.
    - There are 7 sizes to choose from.
    - Colours include US Postal replica or 'Abyss' (a metallic dark blue)
    - Rivetted derailer hanger is nice touch
    - Big clearance between tyre and seat tube despite relatively short rear end.
    - Lots of Bontrager parts except Dura-Ace groupset, Cane Creek headset and Thompson seatpost.
    - Cable guides are one of its downfalls - too far down the tubing and too easy to scar the
    paintwork.
    - Impressed with the bar/stem combo
    - Wheels extremely strong without undue flexing weighing not much more than 1.5kg for the pair. 20
    spoke front, 24 rear.
    - Silent braking impressive.
    - Nice tyres. Overall, the bikes rides like a TdF bike should. Rochelle Gilmore from AIS offered:
    "the stiffness and lightness is just better than any other bike". "When I'm climbing and
    sprinting, the acceleration feels much greater than other bikes." "On a trek you don't feel as
    though you have anything underneath you". "Another thing I like is that they make them small
    enough for women and you can get a really good position on them" (hippy: just remember, the AIS
    team is sponsored by Trek!)
    - It's the balance of traditional geometry and components which complete this tidy package
    - One rider remarked that the bike looked very plain and it was difficult to tell that this was
    the tour bike. People who are not grandstanders will see this as a strength. An educated eye
    will always be able to spot quality in a bike like this. Faultless. Sarah Carrigan (AIS): "the
    bikes are better than any of us expected. You get on them and feel comfy and don't think about
    the bike again"

    hth hippy
     
  3. David Pascoe

    David Pascoe Guest

    Thanks very much for typing this all in, I appreciate it.

    The pricing of the OCLV frames with the rest of the package make them very attractive. Not being the
    tallest of riders, I like their comments about small frames !

    davidp.

    On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 20:17:15 +1100, "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"David Pascoe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> I'm interested in finding out what Ride magazine had to say about a Trek
    >5500
    >> (Issue 17) and a Trek 2300 (Issue 14). Their reviews are normally pretty
    >well
    >> written.
    >>
    >> Does anyone have back issues they can summarise ?
    >
    >I have 17: Trek 5500: Assume rough quotage:
    >
    >- Anyone can purchase the same bike as used by US Postal
    >- Geometry of the frame is fairly standard
    >- The carbon fibre lends itself to a degree of comfort being light, stiff, yet compliant.
    >- There are 7 sizes to choose from.
    >- Colours include US Postal replica or 'Abyss' (a metallic dark blue)
    >- Rivetted derailer hanger is nice touch
    >- Big clearance between tyre and seat tube despite relatively short rear end.
    >- Lots of Bontrager parts except Dura-Ace groupset, Cane Creek headset and Thompson seatpost.
    >- Cable guides are one of its downfalls - too far down the tubing and too easy to scar the
    > paintwork.
    >- Impressed with the bar/stem combo
    >- Wheels extremely strong without undue flexing weighing not much more than 1.5kg for the pair. 20
    > spoke front, 24 rear.
    >- Silent braking impressive.
    >- Nice tyres. Overall, the bikes rides like a TdF bike should. Rochelle Gilmore from AIS offered:
    > "the stiffness and lightness is just better than any other bike". "When I'm climbing and
    > sprinting, the acceleration feels much greater than other bikes." "On a trek you don't feel as
    > though you have anything underneath you". "Another thing I like is that they make them small
    > enough for women and you can get a really good position on them" (hippy: just remember, the AIS
    > team is sponsored by Trek!)
    >- It's the balance of traditional geometry and components which complete this tidy package
    >- One rider remarked that the bike looked very plain and it was difficult to tell that this was
    > the tour bike. People who are not grandstanders will see this as a strength. An educated eye
    > will always be able to spot quality in a bike like this. Faultless. Sarah Carrigan (AIS): "the
    > bikes are better than any of us expected. You get on them and feel comfy and don't think about
    > the bike again"
    >
    >hth hippy
    >

    --
    David Pascoe, [email protected], Western Australia
     
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