Back on Atkins

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by dmcgaw, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. dmcgaw

    dmcgaw Guest

    I did great when I was on Atkins, went from 220 down to 185. Stopped Atkins
    in Aug and gained all my weight back. Back on now and have already lost 10
    pounds.
    www.LiveLonger-Healthier.freelive.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    How many times to you plan to repeat this cycle?

    dmcgaw wrote:
    :: I did great when I was on Atkins, went from 220 down to 185.
    :: Stopped Atkins in Aug and gained all my weight back. Back on now
    :: and have already lost 10 pounds.
    :: www.LiveLonger-Healthier.freelive.com
     
  3. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > How many times to you plan to repeat this cycle?


    Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately. I've even noticed a
    resurgence of low carb amongst my co-workers. Maybe after a few more
    attempts, they will realize that it may even be a good way to eat all the
    time, instead of just to lose weight.

    >
    > dmcgaw wrote:
    > :: I did great when I was on Atkins, went from 220 down to 185.
    > :: Stopped Atkins in Aug and gained all my weight back. Back on now
    > :: and have already lost 10 pounds.
    > :: www.LiveLonger-Healthier.freelive.com
    >
    >
     
  4. Luna

    Luna Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > How many times to you plan to repeat this cycle?

    >
    > Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately.


    Even for people who view low-carb as a lifestyle, not a temporary diet,
    there can be challenges. What happens is, it's Halloween and you have
    all this leftover candy because you only got like, 2 trick-or-treaters
    this year, but they're the mini-sized bars so you can have just a
    couple, right? And just a couple the next day, and so on, and you think
    "As soon as this is all gone, that's it, I'm back to low-carb" but then,
    surprise! Thanksgiving shows up.

    So you go and have Thanksgiving dinner with your family, and you're all
    "Hey, it's just one meal" but then they send you home with leftovers,
    because they love you, and their love takes the form of mashed potatoes
    and green bean casserole. And then before you know it Christmas is here
    and everyone you know and apparently everyone THEY know is giving you
    chocolate, and it's not the crap kind from the drug store either, it's
    the good stuff, so you'd feel awful just throwing it away or regifting,
    because they went and spent all that money on you.

    Oh, and if you're Jewish, you have to have some latkes at Hannukah
    because your 80 year old grandmother made them and she'll cry if you
    don't eat some.

    And then you go to a New Year's Eve party with all the booze and the
    munchies, and so by this time your cravings are back. You make a valiant
    effort to get them under control again, and just when they seem to have
    all but vanished, a box of Valentine's chocolates will somehow
    materialize in your life.

    But hey, you're just at your winter weight, right? And you'll lose it
    again soon, no problem. But the thing about winter is, it's cold. And
    snuggling under a blanket with comfort food just seems so . . . well,
    comforting. And besides, it's cold! So you can live in your big bulky
    sweaters and no one will be the wiser! And you know you can quit the
    carbs any time and lose the weight again before spring.

    But time has this way of passing when you're not noticing, and all of a
    sudden the stores have bathing suits for sale, and you look down at your
    bloated body and bemoan to the world "Wait! Not yet! I'm not ready!
    This is just temporary, this isn't what I really look like! It's not
    faaaaaiiiirr. . . . "

    And so you come crawling back to low-carb, tail between your legs,
    promising you've learned your lesson and asking for just one more
    chance, this time I'll stay, I mean it, I won't disappoint you again,
    come hell or high water or latkes or chocolate, I will remain faithful
    no matter what. See? I bought broccoli, and steaks, and fish, and some
    of that cheese we like, and nothing chocolate at all, see how much this
    proves I'm back for good? Look, I'm eating a salad! With grilled
    chicken! And I like it and I don't want donuts at all, I swear!

    Not that any of the above applies to me, I'm just guessing as to what it
    might be like.
     
  5. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    "Luna" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately.

    >
    > Even for people who view low-carb as a lifestyle, not a temporary diet,
    > there can be challenges. What happens is, it's Halloween and you have
    > all this leftover candy because you only got like, 2 trick-or-treaters
    > this year, but they're the mini-sized bars so you can have just a
    > couple, right? And just a couple the next day, and so on, and you think
    > "As soon as this is all gone, that's it, I'm back to low-carb" but then,
    > surprise! Thanksgiving shows up.
    >
    > So you go and have Thanksgiving dinner with your family, and you're all
    > "Hey, it's just one meal" but then they send you home with leftovers,
    > because they love you, and their love takes the form of mashed potatoes
    > and green bean casserole. And then before you know it Christmas is here
    > and everyone you know and apparently everyone THEY know is giving you
    > chocolate, and it's not the crap kind from the drug store either, it's
    > the good stuff, so you'd feel awful just throwing it away or regifting,
    > because they went and spent all that money on you.
    >
    > Oh, and if you're Jewish, you have to have some latkes at Hannukah
    > because your 80 year old grandmother made them and she'll cry if you
    > don't eat some.
    >
    > And then you go to a New Year's Eve party with all the booze and the
    > munchies, and so by this time your cravings are back. You make a valiant
    > effort to get them under control again, and just when they seem to have
    > all but vanished, a box of Valentine's chocolates will somehow
    > materialize in your life.
    >
    > But hey, you're just at your winter weight, right? And you'll lose it
    > again soon, no problem. But the thing about winter is, it's cold. And
    > snuggling under a blanket with comfort food just seems so . . . well,
    > comforting. And besides, it's cold! So you can live in your big bulky
    > sweaters and no one will be the wiser! And you know you can quit the
    > carbs any time and lose the weight again before spring.
    >
    > But time has this way of passing when you're not noticing, and all of a
    > sudden the stores have bathing suits for sale, and you look down at your
    > bloated body and bemoan to the world "Wait! Not yet! I'm not ready!
    > This is just temporary, this isn't what I really look like! It's not
    > faaaaaiiiirr. . . . "
    >
    > And so you come crawling back to low-carb, tail between your legs,
    > promising you've learned your lesson and asking for just one more
    > chance, this time I'll stay, I mean it, I won't disappoint you again,
    > come hell or high water or latkes or chocolate, I will remain faithful
    > no matter what. See? I bought broccoli, and steaks, and fish, and some
    > of that cheese we like, and nothing chocolate at all, see how much this
    > proves I'm back for good? Look, I'm eating a salad! With grilled
    > chicken! And I like it and I don't want donuts at all, I swear!
    >
    > Not that any of the above applies to me, I'm just guessing as to what it
    > might be like.


    You wrote an excellent description of what I have found in my own life. I
    have mentioned more then a few times that the hardest thing I had to deal
    with (and still do), is fending off family and friends of their offers of
    carby foods. There's always some kind of celebration going on, and if you
    don't partake, you're offending somebody. I get into some heated discussions
    about it sometimes.
    I try to explain that it's part of my life style/way of eating, to turn
    down all offers, and ask them to understand that if I accepted all high carb
    foods that people wanted me to eat, it wouldn't take long before I was fat
    again. Most know that I am doing low carb. It almost seems like they are
    trying to thwart my efforts.
    Lately I've decided that it doesn't help to be honest. The best answer
    that works for me is, "That smells really great! I'll make sure I have some
    later, after my belly doesn't feel so full". I get a little tired of
    repeating myself to the same people.
    I think many that have failed to continue eating low carb should seriously
    look at how they handle the situation of social eating beforehand. Saying
    you're on a diet only works if you're still fat. After slimming down,
    everyone expects that you'll be back in the game, and eating the same crap
    again like everyone else.
    Life style changes are just that. In order to keep from gaining weight, a
    person has to identify the reasons why they got fat in the first place. Peer
    pressure is just one facet. The new motto should be, "Eat less, exercise
    more, and hide from the host".
     
  6. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > How many times to you plan to repeat this cycle?

    >
    > Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately. I've even noticed a
    > resurgence of low carb amongst my co-workers. Maybe after a few more
    > attempts, they will realize that it may even be a good way to eat all the
    > time, instead of just to lose weight.


    It's hard to say what will cause this connection to "click" in a person.
    I had lost and regained weight several times over the years, but never
    had the mindset to do it right until I tried Atkins. It's not as if I
    hadn't heard all of my LIFE that once you go back to eating "normally"
    (regardless of which diet plan you try) you'll gain the weight back, yet
    it never gained a permanent foothold in my brain as far as accepting
    that as a fact of life that I had to abide by if I didn't want to gain
    the weight back. So each time I lost I eventually regained and went
    higher and higher each time.

    Maybe it's because I'm older now and have experienced enough health
    problems for me to TRULY appreciate the benefits of low-carb that go
    well beyond weight loss/control, but it finally DID click with me, so
    there's hope for others :) This ephiphany, though, much like making
    the decision to go on (any) diet in the first place, has to be made
    individually in the person's own good time, and no amount of advice from
    anyone else will make that happen if the person isn't ready. In my
    case, I think it also has something to do with the fact that I HAVE
    learned to accept that I simply CANNOT do everything like "normal"
    people and expect to get the same results as those imaginary people.
    Stubbornly insisting to myself that I CAN just ignore physics and wish
    and hope for the best just makes things worse and sets me up for
    failure. Accepting and EMBRACING this as a permanent change in my
    eating lifestyle has really made ALL the difference in my attitude on
    MANY levels. I don't know that I would EVER have come to that
    conclusion, however, if I hadn't tried Atkins and seen and experienced
    the dramatic (long term) results for myself and realized how doable it
    WOULD be to continue eating this way, having made the decision. Now I
    eat this way because it's what I WANT to do, not because it's what I
    HAVE to do. It's all a matter of perception, baby!

    --
    Saffire
    205/136/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  7. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    > But time has this way of passing when you're not noticing, and all of a
    > sudden the stores have bathing suits for sale, and you look down at your
    > bloated body and bemoan to the world "Wait! Not yet! I'm not ready!
    > This is just temporary, this isn't what I really look like! It's not
    > faaaaaiiiirr. . . . "
    >
    > And so you come crawling back to low-carb, tail between your legs,
    > promising you've learned your lesson and asking for just one more
    > chance, this time I'll stay, I mean it, I won't disappoint you again,
    > come hell or high water or latkes or chocolate, I will remain faithful
    > no matter what. See? I bought broccoli, and steaks, and fish, and some
    > of that cheese we like, and nothing chocolate at all, see how much this
    > proves I'm back for good? Look, I'm eating a salad! With grilled
    > chicken! And I like it and I don't want donuts at all, I swear!
    >
    > Not that any of the above applies to me, I'm just guessing as to what it
    > might be like.


    Of course :) You were just describing a Cathy cartoon (which described
    my life pretty well up until a few years ago -- I even had Cathy cartoon
    checks because I identified with her so much :) A belated welcome
    back, Luna!

    --
    Saffire
    205/136/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  8. Sherry

    Sherry Guest

    "Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > You wrote an excellent description of what I have found in my own life.

    I
    > have mentioned more then a few times that the hardest thing I had to deal
    > with (and still do), is fending off family and friends of their offers of
    > carby foods. There's always some kind of celebration going on, and if you
    > don't partake, you're offending somebody. I get into some heated

    discussions
    > about it sometimes.
    > I try to explain that it's part of my life style/way of eating, to turn
    > down all offers, and ask them to understand that if I accepted all high

    carb
    > foods that people wanted me to eat, it wouldn't take long before I was fat
    > again. Most know that I am doing low carb. It almost seems like they are
    > trying to thwart my efforts.
    > Lately I've decided that it doesn't help to be honest. The best answer
    > that works for me is, "That smells really great! I'll make sure I have

    some
    > later, after my belly doesn't feel so full". I get a little tired of
    > repeating myself to the same people.
    > I think many that have failed to continue eating low carb should

    seriously
    > look at how they handle the situation of social eating beforehand. Saying
    > you're on a diet only works if you're still fat. After slimming down,
    > everyone expects that you'll be back in the game, and eating the same crap
    > again like everyone else.
    > Life style changes are just that. In order to keep from gaining weight,

    a
    > person has to identify the reasons why they got fat in the first place.

    Peer
    > pressure is just one facet. The new motto should be, "Eat less, exercise
    > more, and hide from the host".


    "I don't eat that." No reasons, no excuses, no explanations...but offered
    with a smile and a "thanks anyway" or even a "but it looks delicious!" added
    if someone seems insulted.
    --
    Sherry
    364/290/195 (4/3/05)
    http://lowcarb.owly.net
     
  9. I fixed the Halloween problem. I don't have any kids, but I used to go
    out and buy candy for the kids that show up. And of course, you never
    know how much to buy and can't risk running out. So, now I just go
    out Halloween to a bar. I can have dinner and a few drinks, and it
    doesn't cost me much more than buying all that crap candy!
     
  10. ddgm

    ddgm Guest

    Luna! ROTFL! You have me pegged to a tee! Anyone got any tissues? I'm having
    trouble seeing the monitor! (but I am doing better, I swear!)
    "Luna" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > How many times to you plan to repeat this cycle?

    >>
    >> Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately.

    >
    > Even for people who view low-carb as a lifestyle, not a temporary diet,
    > there can be challenges. What happens is, it's Halloween and you have
    > all this leftover candy because you only got like, 2 trick-or-treaters
    > this year, but they're the mini-sized bars so you can have just a
    > couple, right? And just a couple the next day, and so on, and you think
    > "As soon as this is all gone, that's it, I'm back to low-carb" but then,
    > surprise! Thanksgiving shows up.
    >
    > So you go and have Thanksgiving dinner with your family, and you're all
    > "Hey, it's just one meal" but then they send you home with leftovers,
    > because they love you, and their love takes the form of mashed potatoes
    > and green bean casserole. And then before you know it Christmas is here
    > and everyone you know and apparently everyone THEY know is giving you
    > chocolate, and it's not the crap kind from the drug store either, it's
    > the good stuff, so you'd feel awful just throwing it away or regifting,
    > because they went and spent all that money on you.
    >
    > Oh, and if you're Jewish, you have to have some latkes at Hannukah
    > because your 80 year old grandmother made them and she'll cry if you
    > don't eat some.
    >
    > And then you go to a New Year's Eve party with all the booze and the
    > munchies, and so by this time your cravings are back. You make a valiant
    > effort to get them under control again, and just when they seem to have
    > all but vanished, a box of Valentine's chocolates will somehow
    > materialize in your life.
    >
    > But hey, you're just at your winter weight, right? And you'll lose it
    > again soon, no problem. But the thing about winter is, it's cold. And
    > snuggling under a blanket with comfort food just seems so . . . well,
    > comforting. And besides, it's cold! So you can live in your big bulky
    > sweaters and no one will be the wiser! And you know you can quit the
    > carbs any time and lose the weight again before spring.
    >
    > But time has this way of passing when you're not noticing, and all of a
    > sudden the stores have bathing suits for sale, and you look down at your
    > bloated body and bemoan to the world "Wait! Not yet! I'm not ready!
    > This is just temporary, this isn't what I really look like! It's not
    > faaaaaiiiirr. . . . "
    >
    > And so you come crawling back to low-carb, tail between your legs,
    > promising you've learned your lesson and asking for just one more
    > chance, this time I'll stay, I mean it, I won't disappoint you again,
    > come hell or high water or latkes or chocolate, I will remain faithful
    > no matter what. See? I bought broccoli, and steaks, and fish, and some
    > of that cheese we like, and nothing chocolate at all, see how much this
    > proves I'm back for good? Look, I'm eating a salad! With grilled
    > chicken! And I like it and I don't want donuts at all, I swear!
    >
    > Not that any of the above applies to me, I'm just guessing as to what it
    > might be like.
     
  11. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    :: I fixed the Halloween problem. I don't have any kids, but I used to
    :: go out and buy candy for the kids that show up. And of course, you
    :: never know how much to buy and can't risk running out. So, now I
    :: just go out Halloween to a bar. I can have dinner and a few drinks,
    :: and it doesn't cost me much more than buying all that crap candy!

    Where I live you just turn off the front lights and make the house look
    dark. Folks don't let their kids approach such houses (too scary). This
    would not have worked when I was a kid, however.
     
  12. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    "Sherry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > You wrote an excellent description of what I have found in my own

    life.
    > I
    > > have mentioned more then a few times that the hardest thing I had to

    deal
    > > with (and still do), is fending off family and friends of their offers

    of
    > > carby foods. There's always some kind of celebration going on, and if

    you
    > > don't partake, you're offending somebody. I get into some heated

    > discussions
    > > about it sometimes.
    > > I try to explain that it's part of my life style/way of eating, to

    turn
    > > down all offers, and ask them to understand that if I accepted all high

    > carb
    > > foods that people wanted me to eat, it wouldn't take long before I was

    fat
    > > again. Most know that I am doing low carb. It almost seems like they are
    > > trying to thwart my efforts.
    > > Lately I've decided that it doesn't help to be honest. The best answer
    > > that works for me is, "That smells really great! I'll make sure I have

    > some
    > > later, after my belly doesn't feel so full". I get a little tired of
    > > repeating myself to the same people.
    > > I think many that have failed to continue eating low carb should

    > seriously
    > > look at how they handle the situation of social eating beforehand.

    Saying
    > > you're on a diet only works if you're still fat. After slimming down,
    > > everyone expects that you'll be back in the game, and eating the same

    crap
    > > again like everyone else.
    > > Life style changes are just that. In order to keep from gaining

    weight,
    > a
    > > person has to identify the reasons why they got fat in the first place.

    > Peer
    > > pressure is just one facet. The new motto should be, "Eat less, exercise
    > > more, and hide from the host".

    >
    > "I don't eat that." No reasons, no excuses, no explanations...but offered
    > with a smile and a "thanks anyway" or even a "but it looks delicious!"

    added
    > if someone seems insulted.


    If a person still looks as though they need to lose weight, gracious
    comments of refusal work just fine. After losing all the weight I needed to,
    many think I am too skinny and have gone too far with the dieting. When that
    happens, refusals to eat something comes off as offensive, no matter how
    polite it was intended.

    > --
    > Sherry
    > 364/290/195 (4/3/05)
    > http://lowcarb.owly.net
    >
    >
     
  13. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    "Saffire" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > How many times to you plan to repeat this cycle?

    > >
    > > Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately. I've even noticed a
    > > resurgence of low carb amongst my co-workers. Maybe after a few more
    > > attempts, they will realize that it may even be a good way to eat all

    the
    > > time, instead of just to lose weight.

    >
    > It's hard to say what will cause this connection to "click" in a person.
    > I had lost and regained weight several times over the years, but never
    > had the mindset to do it right until I tried Atkins. It's not as if I
    > hadn't heard all of my LIFE that once you go back to eating "normally"
    > (regardless of which diet plan you try) you'll gain the weight back, yet
    > it never gained a permanent foothold in my brain as far as accepting
    > that as a fact of life that I had to abide by if I didn't want to gain
    > the weight back. So each time I lost I eventually regained and went
    > higher and higher each time.
    >
    > Maybe it's because I'm older now and have experienced enough health
    > problems for me to TRULY appreciate the benefits of low-carb that go
    > well beyond weight loss/control, but it finally DID click with me, so
    > there's hope for others :) This ephiphany, though, much like making
    > the decision to go on (any) diet in the first place, has to be made
    > individually in the person's own good time, and no amount of advice from
    > anyone else will make that happen if the person isn't ready. In my
    > case, I think it also has something to do with the fact that I HAVE
    > learned to accept that I simply CANNOT do everything like "normal"
    > people and expect to get the same results as those imaginary people.
    > Stubbornly insisting to myself that I CAN just ignore physics and wish
    > and hope for the best just makes things worse and sets me up for
    > failure. Accepting and EMBRACING this as a permanent change in my
    > eating lifestyle has really made ALL the difference in my attitude on
    > MANY levels. I don't know that I would EVER have come to that
    > conclusion, however, if I hadn't tried Atkins and seen and experienced
    > the dramatic (long term) results for myself and realized how doable it
    > WOULD be to continue eating this way, having made the decision. Now I
    > eat this way because it's what I WANT to do, not because it's what I
    > HAVE to do. It's all a matter of perception, baby!


    Good points Saffy. There are no magic formulas. A person has to want to
    keep doing it. That is much better than feeling forced to eat a certain way.

    >
    > --
    > Saffire
    > 205/136/125
    > Atkins since 6/14/03
    > Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333
    >
    > *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
    > in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
    >
     
  14. "Luna" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >>
    >> Seems there is a lot of people doing this lately.

    >
    > Even for people who view low-carb as a lifestyle, not a temporary diet,
    > there can be challenges. What happens is, it's Halloween and you have
    > all this leftover candy because you only got like, 2 trick-or-treaters
    > this year, but they're the mini-sized bars so you can have just a
    > couple, right? And just a couple the next day, and so on, and you think
    > "As soon as this is all gone, that's it, I'm back to low-carb" but then,
    > surprise! Thanksgiving shows up.
    >
    > So you go and have Thanksgiving dinner with your family, and you're all
    > "Hey, it's just one meal" but then they send you home with leftovers,
    > because they love you, and their love takes the form of mashed potatoes
    > and green bean casserole. And then before you know it Christmas is here
    > and everyone you know and apparently everyone THEY know is giving you
    > chocolate, and it's not the crap kind from the drug store either, it's
    > the good stuff, so you'd feel awful just throwing it away or regifting,
    > because they went and spent all that money on you.
    >
    > Oh, and if you're Jewish, you have to have some latkes at Hannukah
    > because your 80 year old grandmother made them and she'll cry if you
    > don't eat some.
    >
    > And then you go to a New Year's Eve party with all the booze and the
    > munchies, and so by this time your cravings are back. You make a valiant
    > effort to get them under control again, and just when they seem to have
    > all but vanished, a box of Valentine's chocolates will somehow
    > materialize in your life.
    >
    > But hey, you're just at your winter weight, right? And you'll lose it
    > again soon, no problem. But the thing about winter is, it's cold. And
    > snuggling under a blanket with comfort food just seems so . . . well,
    > comforting. And besides, it's cold! So you can live in your big bulky
    > sweaters and no one will be the wiser! And you know you can quit the
    > carbs any time and lose the weight again before spring.
    >
    > But time has this way of passing when you're not noticing, and all of a
    > sudden the stores have bathing suits for sale, and you look down at your
    > bloated body and bemoan to the world "Wait! Not yet! I'm not ready!
    > This is just temporary, this isn't what I really look like! It's not
    > faaaaaiiiirr. . . . "
    >
    > And so you come crawling back to low-carb, tail between your legs,
    > promising you've learned your lesson and asking for just one more
    > chance, this time I'll stay, I mean it, I won't disappoint you again,
    > come hell or high water or latkes or chocolate, I will remain faithful
    > no matter what. See? I bought broccoli, and steaks, and fish, and some
    > of that cheese we like, and nothing chocolate at all, see how much this
    > proves I'm back for good? Look, I'm eating a salad! With grilled
    > chicken! And I like it and I don't want donuts at all, I swear!
    >
    > Not that any of the above applies to me, I'm just guessing as to what it
    > might be like.



    sure sounds familiar!
    thanks for the review!
    rosie
     
  15. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I fixed the Halloween problem. I don't have any kids, but I used to go
    > out and buy candy for the kids that show up. And of course, you never
    > know how much to buy and can't risk running out. So, now I just go
    > out Halloween to a bar. I can have dinner and a few drinks, and it
    > doesn't cost me much more than buying all that crap candy!


    I just give them dimes instead.

    --
    Saffire
    205/136/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  16. Sherry

    Sherry Guest

    "Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If a person still looks as though they need to lose weight, gracious
    > comments of refusal work just fine. After losing all the weight I needed

    to,
    > many think I am too skinny and have gone too far with the dieting. When

    that
    > happens, refusals to eat something comes off as offensive, no matter how
    > polite it was intended.


    Hmmm...I don't even mention that I'm eating differently to lose weight
    (unless I'm with close family, who all know and also realize that argument
    is futile; "You mean you WANT me to go back to my old habits when I've been
    doing so well???" with a shocked look and a raised eyebrow - BWAHAHAHA!).
    Simply that "I don't eat that". If I were allergic to peanuts and someone
    offered them to me, how I look wouldn't matter, I'd say, "I don't eat that".
    Ditto were I diabetic and they offered me a hot fudge sundae...but if I'd
    already made an issue of my "diet" then I suppose some sorts of people would
    think that gave them the right - if not the duty - to also make an issue of
    it.
    --
    Sherry
    364/290/195 (4/3/05)
    http://lowcarb.owly.net
     
  17. Sherry

    Sherry Guest

  18. justme

    justme Guest

    A friend asked me the other day when we were getting lunch and I asked
    for no bread how long it had been since I really ate bread- except for
    the occasional holiday I haven't really ate more than 50 carbs a day
    for over 8 years! I've slacked on it because I know that my body can't
    handle more than 30 so I have gained a few pounds and am working on
    that right now but I can't eat mashed potatoes or toast without feeling
    really lathargik so I just don't.
    Weird to think about but it does seem to work for me. Except for after
    prengancies, I've never been larger than a baggy size 8
     
  19. On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 04:46:03 GMT, Luna
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Even for people who view low-carb as a lifestyle, not a temporary diet,
    >there can be challenges. What happens is


    <snip>

    You forgot the all-inclusive Caribbean vacation in March. :)

    Jo Anne
     
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