BACK on the BIKE!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by dgk, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. dgk

    dgk Guest

    My surgeon (tennis elbow surgery) has given me the ok to resume
    cycling after a six week hiatus. I biked in to work today. Elbow feels
    ok. I bike out later. Unfortunately I have to miss the demonstration
    by the Brooklyn Bridge at 5:30 in support of safer bike approaches to
    the bridges. That is pretty far out of my way and I really don't want
    to overdue the first day back. I do plan on an icepack when I get
    home.
     
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  2. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    dgk <[email protected]> writes:
    > My surgeon (tennis elbow surgery) has given me the ok to resume
    > cycling after a six week hiatus. I biked in to work today. Elbow feels
    > ok.


    That's great, I'm glad things are looking up for you again.

    Was your first ride after the 6 weeks stronger than you expected?


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  3. dgk

    dgk Guest

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 16:16:56 -0700, [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > dgk <[email protected]> writes:
    >> My surgeon (tennis elbow surgery) has given me the ok to resume
    >> cycling after a six week hiatus. I biked in to work today. Elbow feels
    >> ok.

    >
    >That's great, I'm glad things are looking up for you again.
    >
    >Was your first ride after the 6 weeks stronger than you expected?
    >
    >
    >cheers,
    > Tom


    I did it Monday and Wednesday. And I'll do it Friday. The elbow
    actually hurt a bit but in a different place. More up the tendon than
    right on the elbow. Not while biking, afterwards. Nothing much, I
    think it is a bit tired.

    My legs felt a little heavy after the ride but nothing bad. All in
    all, pretty good. I don't really tear along normally but did make it
    into work in just under an hour (30 seconds under) on Wednesday. That
    is faster than many morning rides.

    Unfortunately I was just a few blocks from home yesterday when I
    stumbled upon a new little Sweet Shoppe on a side road. I never would
    have seen it if I hadn't been biking. No chocolate yet (thank God) but
    plenty of excellent looking little pastries. I ended up with a small
    carrot cake. That way I can fool myself into thinking that it must be
    healthy. There go all the benefits of bike commuting. I'll have to try
    another route.
     
  4. 1oki

    1oki Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > dgk <[email protected]> writes:
    >> My surgeon (tennis elbow surgery) has given me the ok to resume
    >> cycling after a six week hiatus. I biked in to work today. Elbow feels
    >> ok.

    >
    > That's great, I'm glad things are looking up for you again.
    >
    > Was your first ride after the 6 weeks stronger than you expected?


    Went through that the year before last [eye surgery]. And laid off for a
    few months this winter. It took me about 20 minutes to get back into it.

    --
    'They paved paradise
    And put up a parking lot.' -joni mitchell
     
  5. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    dgk <[email protected]> writes:

    >>Was your first ride after the 6 weeks stronger than you expected?
    >>
    >>
    >>cheers,
    >> Tom

    >
    > I did it Monday and Wednesday. And I'll do it Friday. The elbow
    > actually hurt a bit but in a different place. More up the tendon than
    > right on the elbow. Not while biking, afterwards. Nothing much, I
    > think it is a bit tired.
    >
    > My legs felt a little heavy after the ride but nothing bad. All in
    > all, pretty good. I don't really tear along normally but did make it
    > into work in just under an hour (30 seconds under) on Wednesday. That
    > is faster than many morning rides.


    Sounds like you've still got a lot of base fitness then,
    which is good. The longest I've been off the bike for the
    last two or three years was two or three weeks. I was scared
    witless I'd lost a lot of cycling fitness, but my fears were
    unfounded. What little I did lose quickly came back over the
    course of a week.

    > Unfortunately I was just a few blocks from home yesterday when I
    > stumbled upon a new little Sweet Shoppe on a side road. I never would
    > have seen it if I hadn't been biking.


    Destiny rears its ugly head again :)

    > No chocolate yet (thank God) but
    > plenty of excellent looking little pastries. I ended up with a small
    > carrot cake. That way I can fool myself into thinking that it must be
    > healthy. There go all the benefits of bike commuting. I'll have to try
    > another route.


    Aw, a little moderate indulgence now and then
    is good for the soul. Although lately I've
    been getting an on-again/off-again hankering -
    not for decadent confections, but for a nice,
    juicy pomegranate. And the spare time to savour it.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  6. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "1oki" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> dgk <[email protected]> writes:
    >>> My surgeon (tennis elbow surgery) has given me the ok to resume
    >>> cycling after a six week hiatus. I biked in to work today. Elbow feels
    >>> ok.

    >>
    >> That's great, I'm glad things are looking up for you again.
    >>
    >> Was your first ride after the 6 weeks stronger than you expected?

    >
    > Went through that the year before last [eye surgery]. And laid off for a
    > few months this winter. It took me about 20 minutes to get back into it.


    I wonder how long it takes to lose all cycling fitness,
    to the point where the first ride afterward results in
    spaghetti legs? I imagine a couple of years, at least.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  7. 1oki

    1oki Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    >
    > I wonder how long it takes to lose all cycling fitness,
    > to the point where the first ride afterward results in
    > spaghetti legs? I imagine a couple of years, at least.


    Well I did have a sore butt after a layoff. Otherwise the muscles seemed
    non-atrophied.

    --
    'Do you really think any part of this
    should come to the attention of the authorities?'
    -hal
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:

    > I wonder how long it takes to lose all cycling fitness,
    > to the point where the first ride afterward results in
    > spaghetti legs? I imagine a couple of years, at least.


    I had heard that you started losing fitness after only a couple of
    weeks, so I was a bit freaked out this winter when I got a perforated
    colon and couldn't really do anything for a couple of months. I just
    did my first sorta-hard ride with the usual weekly group. I was pretty
    surprised that I could still hang with them. I think losing 15 lb
    helped with the climbs. I did a little indoor trainer riding, but way
    less than once a week, so I thought I'd be toast. I'm pleasantly
    surprised, it doesn't seem to go away that fast.
     
  9. Tom Keats wrote:

    > I wonder how long it takes to lose all cycling fitness, to the point
    > where the first ride afterward results in spaghetti legs? I imagine
    > a couple of years, at least.


    That depends on how old you are and what else you do that keeps your
    aerobic capacity alive. On the other hand it also depends on the
    definition of fitness. There are time in winter when I readily sense
    that I cannot go on a ride over to the coast and back (120mi and
    6000ft) in the Santa Cruz mountains. It takes a stretch of good
    weather to build up to that again. In contrast, I recall when I was
    "young and beautiful" that this never occurred and that without
    thinking about it and with little riding I would undertake such rides.

    Time tells.

    [email protected]
     
  10. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    > > I wonder how long it takes to lose all cycling fitness, to the

    point
    > > where the first ride afterward results in spaghetti legs? I

    imagine
    > > a couple of years, at least.

    >
    > That depends on how old you are and what else you do that keeps your
    > aerobic capacity alive. On the other hand it also depends on the
    > definition of fitness. There are time in winter when I readily sense
    > that I cannot go on a ride over to the coast and back (120mi and
    > 6000ft) in the Santa Cruz mountains. It takes a stretch of good
    > weather to build up to that again. In contrast, I recall when I was
    > "young and beautiful" that this never occurred and that without
    > thinking about it and with little riding I would undertake such

    rides.

    You don't give your age or the amount of time you lay off or what else
    you do during the lay off, so there's not much to calibrate by.

    In the winter, I ride once a week, only 30 miles, but at a brisk pace,
    that's about it for exercise. This maintains enough fitness to do a
    ride each spring of 125 mi/6,000' (virtually identical to your coastal
    loop) without any other preparation. It's not a breeze, but not
    unpleasant. I'm 55.

    > Time tells.

    Perhaps, but not as much as most people seem to think.
     
  11. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > In the winter, I ride once a week, only 30 miles, but at a

    brisk pace,
    > that's about it for exercise. This maintains enough fitness

    to do a
    > ride each spring of 125 mi/6,000' (virtually identical to

    your coastal
    > loop) without any other preparation. It's not a breeze, but

    not
    > unpleasant. I'm 55.
    >

    I'm 55 as well, but have been doing enough in the winter to
    stay in shape enough to start doing flat centuries (this is
    Chicago) without further preparation in the spring. However,
    in March I got a lung infection which pretty much sidelined me
    completely for 5 weeks; I was exercising using a HR monitor,
    and at very low levels of effort my HR would get high, so I
    didn't push it. I lost a lot of conditioning.

    Last Saturday I did my first century of the year -- the last
    half with my daughter, and 50 miles was to be her longest-ever
    ride. I was really hurting at the end, while my daughter was
    still in good shape. I averaged 11.3 m.p.h. and my heart rate
    was still near 120 2 hours later and I couldn't eat. Walking
    wasn't much fun, either. I felt stupid for having
    over-extended myself, for really no reason other than
    stubborness.

    Beginning Sunday evening, though, I started to feel stronger
    than I have since February and I feel GREAT! I guess it
    really is true that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger
    (and perhaps vice-versa).
     
  12. Alfred Ryder

    Alfred Ryder Guest

    "Mike Kruger" wrote
    <snip>
    > I guess it
    > really is true that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger
    > (and perhaps vice-versa).
    >

    Huh?
     
  13. bbaka

    bbaka Guest

    Mike Kruger wrote:
    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >>In the winter, I ride once a week, only 30 miles, but at a

    >
    > brisk pace,
    >
    >>that's about it for exercise. This maintains enough fitness

    >
    > to do a
    >
    >>ride each spring of 125 mi/6,000' (virtually identical to

    >
    > your coastal
    >
    >>loop) without any other preparation. It's not a breeze, but

    >
    > not
    >
    >>unpleasant. I'm 55.
    >>

    >
    > I'm 55 as well, but have been doing enough in the winter to
    > stay in shape enough to start doing flat centuries (this is
    > Chicago) without further preparation in the spring. However,
    > in March I got a lung infection which pretty much sidelined me
    > completely for 5 weeks; I was exercising using a HR monitor,
    > and at very low levels of effort my HR would get high, so I
    > didn't push it. I lost a lot of conditioning.
    >
    > Last Saturday I did my first century of the year -- the last
    > half with my daughter, and 50 miles was to be her longest-ever
    > ride. I was really hurting at the end, while my daughter was
    > still in good shape. I averaged 11.3 m.p.h. and my heart rate
    > was still near 120 2 hours later and I couldn't eat. Walking
    > wasn't much fun, either. I felt stupid for having
    > over-extended myself, for really no reason other than
    > stubborness.


    With a heart rate of 120 after 2 hours I would see a doctor and see if
    there isn't something going on that you should know about. I am 56 and
    my heart rate goes below 100 within 5 to 10 minutes after riding hard
    and fast. After two hours I am down to about 72-76, then two more hours
    and I am down to my usual 62-64 daytime rate. Then again it could just
    be we have different metabolisms, but I would think that 120 after 2
    hours would justify an official doctor checkup.
    Be safe, not sorry.
    >
    > Beginning Sunday evening, though, I started to feel stronger
    > than I have since February and I feel GREAT! I guess it
    > really is true that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger
    > (and perhaps vice-versa).
    >
    >

    Let's hope it does make you stronger. I just have memories of Jim Fixx
    stuck in my head and what happened to him by thinking he was in tip top
    shape.
    Happy riding, summer is coming soon.
    Bill Baka
     
  14. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:
    > I wonder how long it takes to lose all cycling fitness,
    > to the point where the first ride afterward results in
    > spaghetti legs? I imagine a couple of years, at least.
    >
    >


    After getting back into cycling last year, but then not doing much
    during the winter, I am pleasantly surprised by my performance
    on the first few rides of the season. None of that horrible lung-
    burning feeling that means you are really out of shape, just a bit
    less pep in my legs toward the end of a ride. It would be really
    depressing to have to start from scratch each time you laid off for
    a while.

    Jeff T
     
  15. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Beginning Sunday evening, though, I started to feel stronger
    > than I have since February and I feel GREAT! I guess it
    > really is true that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger
    > (and perhaps vice-versa).


    It's truly marvellous, the way the cyclist's body can
    rebound after a long stint of not riding. So, riders
    who are forced to lay off the bike for awhile -- take
    heart! Of course, taking care not to overstress
    injuries in the process of healing is called-for, too.

    When I've given riding a rest for a week or so, I've
    always felt stronger when resuming. But maybe part
    of that is just the invigourating joy of being
    awheel again.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  16. boy u sound soft, the hell with overgoing it, biking is about intensity
    not softness.
     
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