Bacon problems

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by kalanamak, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. kalanamak

    kalanamak Guest


    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 23:55:32 GMT, David Hare-Scott wrote:


    >> What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    >> symptoms?
    >>


    Could this be your version of the headache-less migraine from the nitrates?
    I get the nausea, the aura, etc. and about 80% of the time no headache.
    Sometimes I get the sick feeling, no aura, then the HA. If I don't have
    the aura or the HA, I don't feel confident enough to ascribe a bad
    feeling to migraine, but it is possible.
    (I remember the first time I had the aura. I was shopping, and in med
    school, and I calmly thought "I'm either about to have a catastrophic
    intracranial event or my first migraine", and went on checking out at
    the hardware store. Got out to the car and WHAM: migraine.
    P.s the aura looks like a ring of teeny black and white triangles all
    dancing together. It slowly expands outward.)
     
    Tags:


  2. I have a problem with bacon. Sometimes when I eat it (two rashers will do
    the trick) I feel unwell soon afterwards. I feel slightly nauseas, giddy
    and I can feel my pulse in my chest and head, this lasts for several hours.
    I am not a sickly person or generally subject to allergies or reactions to
    food. I thought that it could be:

    1) the salt
    2) the fat
    3) preservative
    4) flavour agent in the making of the bacon

    I have tested the first two items and although I generally have a low salt,
    low fat diet there are times when indulge in either or both and I do not
    get the symptoms.

    So the question is:

    What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    symptoms?

    David
     
  3. Reg

    Reg Guest

    David Hare-Scott wrote:

    > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    > symptoms?


    Not a good assumption. It could be the meat itself, not just the
    additives.

    In any case you'd be much better off asking a doctor instead
    of a usenet group. Prepare for a lot of random guesswork, innuendo,
    non sequitur stories about family pets, etc.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
  4. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "David Hare-Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have a problem with bacon. Sometimes when I eat it (two rashers will do
    > the trick) I feel unwell soon afterwards. I feel slightly nauseas, giddy
    > and I can feel my pulse in my chest and head, this lasts for several
    > hours.
    > I am not a sickly person or generally subject to allergies or reactions to
    > food. I thought that it could be:
    >
    > 1) the salt
    > 2) the fat
    > 3) preservative
    > 4) flavour agent in the making of the bacon
    >
    > I have tested the first two items and although I generally have a low
    > salt,
    > low fat diet there are times when indulge in either or both and I do not
    > get the symptoms.
    >
    > So the question is:
    >
    > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    > symptoms?
    >
    > David
    >

    Nitrates? - pulse
    Fat - nausea & gall bladder?
    Salt - high blood pressure?
    Sugar or maple in the curing? - disoriented?

    Try a nitrate free, low salt, less sweetening bacon if you can find it and
    see what this does for you? If you think it could be the fat, try eating
    some vinegar-y type juice (pomegranate or cherry or cranberry) to cut the
    fat and some dry toast when you eat it.
    Dr. Dee
     
  5. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    David Hare-Scott wrote:
    >
    > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known
    > to produce such symptoms?


    You could test the possibility that it's the nitrate
    or nitrites by trying some bacon lacking those
    additives. I don't know what's available where you
    live, but around here I can get nitrate/nitrite-free
    bacon at expensive grocery stores that cater to the
    "natural foods" crown, such as Whole Foods.

    You could test the possibility that it is salt
    by soaking the bacon in water for several hours or
    overnight (with a couple water changes) before cooking,
    but that will also leach out the nitrate/nitrite and
    probably a lot of flavor.
     
  6. dee

    dee Guest

    David Hare-Scott wrote:
    > I have a problem with bacon. Sometimes when I eat it (two rashers will do
    > the trick) I feel unwell soon afterwards. I feel slightly nauseas, giddy
    > and I can feel my pulse in my chest and head, this lasts for several hours.
    > I am not a sickly person or generally subject to allergies or reactions to
    > food. I thought that it could be:
    >
    > 1) the salt
    > 2) the fat
    > 3) preservative
    > 4) flavour agent in the making of the bacon
    >
    > I have tested the first two items and although I generally have a low salt,
    > low fat diet there are times when indulge in either or both and I do not
    > get the symptoms.
    >
    > So the question is:
    >
    > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    > symptoms?
    >
    > David


    go for a walk, and relax, that might do the trick. best wishes.
     
  7. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 23:55:32 GMT, David Hare-Scott wrote:

    > I have a problem with bacon. Sometimes when I eat it (two rashers will do
    > the trick) I feel unwell soon afterwards. I feel slightly nauseas, giddy
    > and I can feel my pulse in my chest and head, this lasts for several hours.
    > I am not a sickly person or generally subject to allergies or reactions to
    > food. I thought that it could be:
    >
    > 1) the salt
    > 2) the fat
    > 3) preservative
    > 4) flavour agent in the making of the bacon
    >
    > I have tested the first two items and although I generally have a low salt,
    > low fat diet there are times when indulge in either or both and I do not
    > get the symptoms.
    >
    > So the question is:
    >
    > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    > symptoms?
    >

    I don't know, but I can tell you it's one of the "stay away" foods for
    gout, so leave it alone if it's talking back to you.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  8. John Long

    John Long Guest

    sf wrote:
    >
    > leave it alone if it's talking back to you.


    Good advice.
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Reg wrote:
    > David Hare-Scott wrote:
    >
    > > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    > > symptoms?

    >
    > Not a good assumption. It could be the meat itself, not just the
    > additives.


    Exactly what I was thinking... he already said he hasn't had that
    treaction from other
    cured meats. But someone who considers just two rashers of bacon
    sufficient in all likelihood keeps an opened package of bacon in the
    fridge a looooong, loooooong time.

    > In any case you'd be much better off asking a doctor instead
    > of a usenet group. Prepare for a lot of random guesswork, innuendo,
    > non sequitur stories about family pets, etc.


    I doubt a doctor will be of much help unless he goes to the ER during
    an episode.

    I'm pretty certain it's spoiled bacon. Once that package is opened
    it's got to be consumed within a week to ten days... and don't handle
    it with unwashed hands. People somehow think that cured means
    preserved, and that preserved means immune from spoilage. NOT!
     
  10. "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    But someone who considers just two rashers of bacon
    > sufficient in all likelihood keeps an opened package of bacon in the
    > fridge a looooong, loooooong time.
    >


    Not necessarily. You can open the package, take out 2 rashers and freeze
    the rest. Or, at most delis, supermarket deli counters, and butchers here
    bacon is sold by weight. You can buy 2 rashers at a time if you want.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
     
  11. "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    But someone who considers just two rashers of bacon
    > sufficient in all likelihood keeps an opened package of bacon in the
    > fridge a looooong, loooooong time.
    >


    Not necessarily. You can open the package, take out 2 rashers and freeze
    the rest. Or, at most delis, supermarket deli counters, and butchers here
    bacon is sold by weight. You can buy 2 rashers at a time if you want.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
     
  12. "Reg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > David Hare-Scott wrote:
    >
    > > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce

    such
    > > symptoms?

    >
    > Not a good assumption. It could be the meat itself, not just the
    > additives.


    I have no problem with pork in general.

    David
     
  13. "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce

    such
    > > symptoms?
    > >

    > I don't know, but I can tell you it's one of the "stay away" foods for
    > gout, so leave it alone if it's talking back to you.
    > --
    >


    I know that's the simple answer but the effect is so irregular so I suspect
    there is something in some bacon but not all bacon. I am going to check out
    the nitrate/nitrite aspect and see what comes up.

    David
     
  14. "Rhonda Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > But someone who considers just two rashers of bacon
    > > sufficient in all likelihood keeps an opened package of bacon in the
    > > fridge a looooong, loooooong time.
    > >

    >
    > Not necessarily. You can open the package, take out 2 rashers and freeze
    > the rest. Or, at most delis, supermarket deli counters, and butchers here
    > bacon is sold by weight. You can buy 2 rashers at a time if you want.
    >
    > --

    Quite so. Maybe I could get some excercise by jumping to conclusions too?
    However you have to do it in public for it to count, so I will pass.

    David
     
  15. Stan  Horwitz

    Stan Horwitz Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "David Hare-Scott" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have a problem with bacon. Sometimes when I eat it (two rashers will do
    > the trick) I feel unwell soon afterwards. I feel slightly nauseas, giddy
    > and I can feel my pulse in my chest and head, this lasts for several hours.
    > I am not a sickly person or generally subject to allergies or reactions to
    > food. I thought that it could be:
    >
    > 1) the salt
    > 2) the fat
    > 3) preservative
    > 4) flavour agent in the making of the bacon
    >
    > I have tested the first two items and although I generally have a low salt,
    > low fat diet there are times when indulge in either or both and I do not
    > get the symptoms.
    >
    > So the question is:
    >
    > What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    > symptoms?


    Look on the ingredients list on the package.

    Does this effect happen with different brands of bacon or only one
    particular brand?
     
  16. On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 23:55:32 GMT, "David Hare-Scott"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a problem with bacon. Sometimes when I eat it (two rashers will do
    >the trick) I feel unwell soon afterwards. I feel slightly nauseas, giddy
    >and I can feel my pulse in my chest and head, this lasts for several hours.
    >I am not a sickly person or generally subject to allergies or reactions to
    >food. I thought that it could be:


    (snip)

    >So the question is:
    >
    >What substances are used in making bacon and are any known to produce such
    >symptoms?


    Do you react to other lunchmeats? ie. ham and salami etc. Bacon is
    chock full of nitrates, but so is lunchmeat... I can't eat very much
    of it at a time or I get palpitations and feel like my heart's racing.
    I get the same reaction from MSG...

    Bacon isn't exactly what I'd call a 'healthful' food, so it really
    won't hurt you if you cut it out of your diet altogether. You just
    won't be able to have a nice carbonara!

    Oh, and almost all American bacon is so incredibly salty that I either
    can't eat it at all, or have had enough after a rasher or two. The
    'reduced sodium' bacon is almost as bad as the regular kind, but we
    found a place that makes their own bacon and it's much less salty so
    we usually get that.

    --
    ~Karen aka Kajikit
    Crafts, cats, and chocolate - the three essentials of life
    http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    Online photo album - http://community.webshots.com/user/kajikit
     
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