Bad back - what to do now?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Chris Mumford, Jun 15, 2003.

  1. I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out that
    I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out". Since
    then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!

    I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of multi-sport events that don't
    include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored doing the same old
    thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of the duathlons I've
    seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?
     
    Tags:


  2. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >

    Forgive me for asking, but what sort of doctor is this? The reason that I ask is that I can say from
    personal experience that one will get all sorts of diagnoses and recommendations from doctors -
    often quite contradictory! Unless your doctor specializes in the spine, and possibly in the lumbar
    region, I'd want to check with one that did. Again, I say this from experience, since I too have
    several degenerated and herniated discs. Some doctors want you to have immediate surgery, some want
    you to have little exercise (it sounds like yours fits here!), and others will be quite proactive in
    treatment, with the goal of letting you have normal activity levels. With a good strengthening
    program, oftimes one can continue to do almost everything. Of course, it depends entirely on the
    injury, but my point is that most doctors simply aren't up on the latest info. If you trust your
    doctor, or if he's a specialist in the area, then go with it. Otherwise, get a second opinion from a
    specialist. (In my case, instead of being inactive with possible surgery, I have had strengthening
    and a small amount of NAISD's daily, and I have been 95% pain free since! It took several doctors to
    get to that point, again, which is why I'd say it might be worth it to check!) One last thing -
    inserts and running shoes picked out for you by the staff of a running-specific store also goes a
    long way to control pain and other problems...
     
  3. Chris Mumford wrote:
    >
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >
    > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of multi-sport events that don't
    > include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored doing the same old
    > thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of the duathlons I've
    > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?

    I lift weights as my main form of exercise and love it. I continue to run, bike, and swim, as well
    as study a martial art, but since I discovered lifting, my back has been much happier and I run,
    swim, and bike less. Lifting that will help, not hurt, your back is all about proper technique,
    make no mistake about that. It is not without risk, it can be brutally hard, but it offers real
    rewards including but not limited to a healthier back in the rest of your life. I was bedridden
    with a laterally herniated L4-L5 - 3 weeks of 24/7 Percoset, several months of getting out of bed
    only to go to the bathroom and briefly to eat, and over a year until I could walk without a limp. I
    now deadlift over 300 lbs. at a bodyweight of 153, bodyfat of 13%, and feel pretty damned good most
    of the time.

    I have a semi-commercial web site devoted to introducing people to kettlebells, which are what I use
    for the bulk of my training. Most of what I've learned comes from Pavel Tsatsouline, and there are
    links on my web site to that of Pavel's publisher. Disclaimer: I make a commission from purchases
    made from Pavel's publisher that were initiated through links on my web site but I make nothing and
    receive no reward for web hits, so browse to your heart's content. My site is below, and I'm happy
    to answer questions here or via email. I put the site together because I got tired of answering the
    same questions over and over, and I'm delighted to be making a little money for my efforts.

    Steve Freides - D.Ma., RKC, NSCA-CPT, YMCA lifeguard instructor and swim teacher, and man about
    town. http://www.kbnj.com
     
  4. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    It's a tough call, but I wouldn't give up hope yet. Topdogs advice is top-notch. Try to see someone
    who specialises in this type of injury.

    My wife injured her back several years ago at work. She has undergone all the standard treatments.
    Physio, Chiropractor, Acupuncture, she now does yoga, and finds some of the poses quite helpful. She
    also got the name of a Physiotherapist who specialised in backs. Much to her surprise, she found
    that most of the physiotherapy she had been taking up to then was the exact opposite of the type of
    movements she should have been doing.

    In a nutshell, movements and stretches that elongated muscles and attachments in the area such as
    forward bends etc, stretched the discs further apart, and aggravated the injury. Hyper extension
    movements such as lying on the floor on your stomach, and raising your upper body toward the ceiling
    helped compress the injured area, an help it return to its natural state.

    I am not making a diagnosis here, just pointing out as Topdog noted, see someone that knows what
    they are talking about. And not everyone who claims to know what they are talking about, does.

    Jim

    "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of
    multi-sport
    > events that don't include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored
    > doing the same old thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of
    > the duathlons
    I've
    > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?
     
  5. Ray Plotecia

    Ray Plotecia Guest

    I came up with a herniation at the L5-S1 which causes a sciatic pain problem. Turns out that I have
    had this off and on for years only this year an MRI told me what it is.

    I have received 2 epidural steroid injections to reduce swelling and am undergoing physical therapy,
    ultrasound, electro-stim, massage, and a series of exercises called the McKenzie protocol which, I
    am told, should cause the herniation to recede back where it belongs and leave me in good shape.

    So far I am about 90% pain free and improving. I also ordered a new carbon frame to ease the stress
    and give me more comfort on the bike. My wife bought it for me, kinda like giving me a hug, only
    more expensive.

    I have just started running again. 30 minutes 3 times a week. So far I feel good.

    I will go to faith healers, witch doctors and everything else before I consider the S-word.

    Ray

    --
    _______________
    | Beer Truck | ||'|"\,___.
    | _..._...______===|=||_|__|...,]
    (@)'(@)"""*|(@)(@)*****(@)*I

    "Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them."
    - Albert Einstein

    "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of
    multi-sport
    > events that don't include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored
    > doing the same old thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of
    > the duathlons
    I've
    > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?
     
  6. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    > I will go to faith healers, witch doctors and everything else before I consider the S-word.
    >
    > Ray

    My sister-in-law had an injury similar to mine. She saw one of the neurosurgeons in the area - he
    treats the WORLD CHAMPS! San Antonio Spurs (Yes, I AM from SA!) - and he operated immediately. 4
    fused vertebrae, 3 years, and a great deal less mobility later, she still has a lot of problems. Her
    mistake was seeing a surgeon rather than someone who specializes in spinal rehabilitation and pain
    management. Surgeons, not surprisingly, tend to recommend surgery, while rehab doctors try
    everything to find other methods to deal with the injury. When you start to develop serious
    numbness, however, that's when the nature of the beast changes. The good news is that the surgical
    techniques are changing quite rapidly, especially in the lumbar area. It's getting less and less
    invasive - at some point, it may be pretty simple and normal. But, for the most of us, it's a matter
    of dealing with pain primarily, and there's so many options out there before anyone wants to use the
    s-word, agreed!
     
  7. Ray Plotecia wrote:
    >
    > I came up with a herniation at the L5-S1 which causes a sciatic pain problem. Turns out that I
    > have had this off and on for years only this year an MRI told me what it is.
    >
    > I have received 2 epidural steroid injections to reduce swelling and am undergoing physical
    > therapy, ultrasound, electro-stim, massage, and a series of exercises called the McKenzie
    > protocol which, I am told, should cause the herniation to recede back where it belongs and leave
    > me in good shape.

    I hurt my back about 6 years ago and continue to do the McKenzie exercises daily, usually several
    times a day. I had a single steroid shot as well. Anyone in the metro NYC area should consider Dr.
    Dante Implicito - he's the guy I used and I think he's fantastic. Among other things, he's
    certified to administer his own shots and he's got his own technique of doing it, with an x-ray
    technician giving him regular pictures during the procedure, to ensure the medicine goes right
    where it's needed.

    -S- http://www.kbnj.com

    > So far I am about 90% pain free and improving. I also ordered a new carbon frame to ease the
    > stress and give me more comfort on the bike. My wife bought it for me, kinda like giving me a hug,
    > only more expensive.
    >
    > I have just started running again. 30 minutes 3 times a week. So far I feel good.
    >
    > I will go to faith healers, witch doctors and everything else before I consider the S-word.
    >
    > Ray
    >
    > --
    > _______________
    > | Beer Truck | ||'|"\,___.
    > | _..._...______===|=||_|__|...,]
    > (@)'(@)"""*|(@)(@)*****(@)*I
    >
    > "Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them."
    > - Albert Einstein
    >
    > "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of
    > multi-sport
    > > events that don't include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored
    > > doing the same old thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most
    > > of the duathlons
    > I've
    > > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?
    > >
     
  8. "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!

    Find another doctor. I have an L5-S1 herniated disk and I find that running actually helps. When
    sitting at my desk all day has my back irritated and nice run will work the kinks out.

    Find a good neurosurgeon. Mine said I sould not let the disk problem lower the quality of my life
    and should go about business as usual (being careful how I lift things of course). I agree 100%,
    when/if I make it worse, then I will let him cut me and fix it and go back to running.

    The most important thing is to stay away from orthopods. Every single one I have seen are absolutly
    clueless when it comes to DDD....
     
  9. "topdog" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I will go to faith healers, witch doctors and everything else before I consider the S-word.
    > >
    > > Ray
    >
    > Her mistake was seeing a surgeon rather than someone who specializes in spinal rehabilitation and
    > pain management. Surgeons, not surprisingly, tend to recommend surgery, while rehab doctors try
    > everything to find other methods to deal with the injury.

    She did not see a good surgeon. I have seen 2 good surgeons for my L5-S1. (Had to find another one
    when I moved.) In my case when my disk flares up I have about 3 weeks of severe pain followed by a
    pretty quick recovery with the aid of lumbar traction and epidural cortozone. Neither surgeon wants
    to cut me open at this point. Both hold it out as a posibility if things get worse, and as I
    understand it there are some cases surgury is not only recomended but sort of on an emergency basis,
    i.e. to avoid/arrest perminant damage to other parts of the body.

    > When you start to develop serious numbness, however, that's when the nature of the beast changes.

    Actually they seem to be more interested in how well you can urinate. I get the feeling if they ever
    ask and the answer is "I can't go" I'll be on a table before I finish the sentence.
     
  10. "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ray Plotecia wrote: I hurt my back about 6 years ago and continue to do the McKenzie exercises
    > daily, usually several times a day.

    Could someone define for me the McKenzie exercises? It's quite probable that they are the same
    exercises prescribed by my PT but I was just unaware they have a name?
     
  11. Ray Plotecia

    Ray Plotecia Guest

    McKenzie exercises

    These exercises are named after a physical therapist in New Zealand who noted that extending the
    spine could reduce pain generated from the disc space. Theoretically, extension may also help reduce
    a herniated disc and reduce pressure on a nerve root. For patients who are suffering from leg pain
    due to a disc herniation (a radiculopathy), extending the spine may help reduce the leg pain by
    "centralizing" the pain (moving the pain from the leg to the back). For most patients, back pain is
    usually more tolerable than leg pain, and if a patient is able to centralize the pain, they may be
    able to continue with conservative treatment and avoid a surgical discectomy.

    When the pain is acute, the exercises should be done frequently (every one to two hours). Patients
    should also try to avoid flexing the spine (bending forward).

    McKenzie exercises may also be helpful for those individuals who have back pain due to degenerative
    disc disease. While sitting or flexing forward can accentuate low back pain for patients with
    degenerative disc disease, extending the spine can serve to relieve the pressure on the disc. Note
    that the opposite is true in elderly patients who have facet osteoarthritis and/or lumbar stenosis
    (extending the spine jams the facet joints on the back and increases pressure across the joints, so
    these patients will typically feel better sitting, and have more pain with extension).

    "James Goddard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Ray Plotecia wrote: I hurt my back about 6 years ago and continue to do the McKenzie exercises
    > > daily, usually several times a day.
    >
    > Could someone define for me the McKenzie exercises? It's quite probable that they are the same
    > exercises prescribed by my PT but I was just
    unaware
    > they have a name?
     
  12. Jeff Bryant

    Jeff Bryant Guest

    "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of
    multi-sport
    > events that don't include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored
    > doing the same old thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of
    > the duathlons
    I've
    > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?

    I had a herniated L5-S1 with sciatica several years ago (as determined by an MRI). Started with
    Percoset to take the edge off the sciatica. Then saw a gentle chiropractor for 3-4 months for
    manipulation, back rolling machine, and easy exercises. The good news I believe is that herniated
    disks can recover without surgery if taken care of, and do everything possible to avoid progressing
    to ruptured disks (defintely requires surgey, but never get fused - I have a friend with a success
    story after 5 ruptured disks and bent over for 7 years, saw the sports surgeon for the Seattle
    Seahawks).

    I discovered that *for me* (I am no doctor and I would consult with yours before trying it on you)
    one thing that helped was to occassionally hang by my arms from a chin-up bar, rafter, etc. Seemed
    to help relieve some of the pressure and maybe helped suck the disk lfuid back where it belongs.

    I also found that as I strengthened my abdomen and lower back I avoided re-injurying it.

    Overall I think see a chiro, back specialist, etc. is a great start. If the pain is too much then an
    MD that can prescribe real pain meds like Percoset is handy. The specialist should be able to help
    you get started on a recovery/prevention exercise program. Swimming and weights seem like a couple
    of ideal training sports for long-term enjoyment and better health. Reducing weight will reduce the
    strain the overweight belly pouts on the lower back (benn there, done that).

    Now, several years later my back is A-OK, haven't had a back problem for the last 5 years, and I
    completed my first marathon in great shape last month.

    There is hope for a full recovery, but take it easy, be smart and work towards the long-term goals
    of full recovery and health. Don't worsen your situation by trying to force undue stress on your
    back until you know what cause so many herniated disks and correct that situation, loose some
    weight, strengthen the abs and back, and start with some low impact sports until you are confident
    of the muscles supporting the back to buffer the strain on the discs. Better safe than sorry; slow
    and sure. Good luck with your recovery!

    Jeff
     
  13. Mikeb

    Mikeb Guest

    Hi,

    You can find more info, and a list of Mckenzie certified practitioners, at www.mckenziemdt.org.
    There's also a book written by Robin Mckenzie called ''treat your own back"

    Mike B.

    In message <[email protected]>, "James Goddard"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Ray Plotecia wrote: I hurt my back about 6 years ago and continue to do the McKenzie exercises
    > > daily, usually several times a day.
    >
    > Could someone define for me the McKenzie exercises? It's quite probable that they are the same
    > exercises prescribed by my PT but I was just unaware they have a name?
    >

    --
    Posted with Ink Spot (for PocketPC) from DejaVu Software, Inc. Usenet wherever you are -
    http://www.dejavusoftware.com/
     
  14. Ray Plotecia

    Ray Plotecia Guest

    "Treat your own Back" is the book that I have. It should be the standard "user manual" for anyone
    who owns a back. It's great.

    Ray

    "MikeB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > You can find more info, and a list of Mckenzie certified practitioners, at www.mckenziemdt.org.
    > There's also a book written by Robin Mckenzie called ''treat your own back"
    >
    > Mike B.
    >
    > In message <[email protected]>, "James
    Goddard"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Ray Plotecia wrote: I hurt my back about 6 years ago and continue to do the McKenzie exercises
    > > > daily, usually several times a day.
    > >
    > > Could someone define for me the McKenzie exercises? It's quite
    probable
    > > that they are the same exercises prescribed by my PT but I was just
    unaware
    > > they have a name?
    > >
    >
    > --
    > Posted with Ink Spot (for PocketPC) from DejaVu Software, Inc. Usenet wherever you are -
    > http://www.dejavusoftware.com/
     
  15. John

    John Guest

    I herniated the same disk, L5-S1 in 1996. It healed on it's own with the help of anti-inflamatories
    and rest. It flares up a bit from time to time, and I have found that the absolute best prevention
    is keeping the weight off and exercising, including abdominal workouts a few times per week.

    "Jeff Bryant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of
    > multi-sport
    > > events that don't include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored
    > > doing the same old thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most
    > > of the duathlons
    > I've
    > > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?
    >
    > I had a herniated L5-S1 with sciatica several years ago (as determined by an MRI). Started with
    > Percoset to take the edge off the sciatica. Then
    saw
    > a gentle chiropractor for 3-4 months for manipulation, back rolling
    machine,
    > and easy exercises. The good news I believe is that herniated disks can recover without surgery if
    > taken care of, and do everything possible to avoid progressing to ruptured disks (defintely
    > requires surgey, but never get fused - I have a friend with a success story after 5 ruptured disks
    and
    > bent over for 7 years, saw the sports surgeon for the Seattle Seahawks).
    >
    > I discovered that *for me* (I am no doctor and I would consult with yours before trying it on you)
    > one thing that helped was to occassionally hang
    by
    > my arms from a chin-up bar, rafter, etc. Seemed to help relieve some of
    the
    > pressure and maybe helped suck the disk lfuid back where it belongs.
    >
    > I also found that as I strengthened my abdomen and lower back I avoided re-injurying it.
    >
    > Overall I think see a chiro, back specialist, etc. is a great start. If
    the
    > pain is too much then an MD that can prescribe real pain meds like
    Percoset
    > is handy. The specialist should be able to help you get started on a recovery/prevention exercise
    > program. Swimming and weights seem like a couple of ideal training sports for long-term enjoyment
    > and better health. Reducing weight will reduce the strain the overweight belly pouts on the lower
    > back (benn there, done that).
    >
    > Now, several years later my back is A-OK, haven't had a back problem for
    the
    > last 5 years, and I completed my first marathon in great shape last month.
    >
    > There is hope for a full recovery, but take it easy, be smart and work towards the long-term goals
    > of full recovery and health. Don't worsen
    your
    > situation by trying to force undue stress on your back until you know what cause so many herniated
    > disks and correct that situation, loose some
    weight,
    > strengthen the abs and back, and start with some low impact sports until
    you
    > are confident of the muscles supporting the back to buffer the strain on
    the
    > discs. Better safe than sorry; slow and sure. Good luck with your recovery!
    >
    > Jeff
     
  16. Ray Plotecia

    Ray Plotecia Guest

    You are so right. My PT has told me that the abdominal workouts are something I have to do for the
    rest of my life. Small price to pay.

    Ray

    "John" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I herniated the same disk, L5-S1 in 1996. It healed on it's own with the help of
    > anti-inflamatories and rest. It flares up a bit from time to
    time,
    > and I have found that the absolute best prevention is keeping the weight
    off
    > and exercising, including abdominal workouts a few times per week.
    >
    > "Jeff Bryant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back
    went
    > > > out, and it turns out that I have two degenerated disks - one of them
    is
    > > > herniated. My doctor says, "running is out". Since then I've reduced
    my
    > > > workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of
    > > multi-sport
    > > > events that don't include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get
    > > > bored doing the same old thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a
    > > > swimmer). Most of the
    duathlons
    > > I've
    > > > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?
    > >
    > > I had a herniated L5-S1 with sciatica several years ago (as determined
    by
    > > an MRI). Started with Percoset to take the edge off the sciatica. Then
    > saw
    > > a gentle chiropractor for 3-4 months for manipulation, back rolling
    > machine,
    > > and easy exercises. The good news I believe is that herniated disks can recover without surgery
    > > if taken care of, and do everything possible to avoid progressing to ruptured disks (defintely
    > > requires surgey, but
    never
    > > get fused - I have a friend with a success story after 5 ruptured disks
    > and
    > > bent over for 7 years, saw the sports surgeon for the Seattle Seahawks).
    > >
    > > I discovered that *for me* (I am no doctor and I would consult with
    yours
    > > before trying it on you) one thing that helped was to occassionally hang
    > by
    > > my arms from a chin-up bar, rafter, etc. Seemed to help relieve some of
    > the
    > > pressure and maybe helped suck the disk lfuid back where it belongs.
    > >
    > > I also found that as I strengthened my abdomen and lower back I avoided re-injurying it.
    > >
    > > Overall I think see a chiro, back specialist, etc. is a great start. If
    > the
    > > pain is too much then an MD that can prescribe real pain meds like
    > Percoset
    > > is handy. The specialist should be able to help you get started on a recovery/prevention
    > > exercise program. Swimming and weights seem like a couple of ideal training sports for long-term
    > > enjoyment and better
    health.
    > > Reducing weight will reduce the strain the overweight belly pouts on the lower back (benn there,
    > > done that).
    > >
    > > Now, several years later my back is A-OK, haven't had a back problem for
    > the
    > > last 5 years, and I completed my first marathon in great shape last
    month.
    > >
    > > There is hope for a full recovery, but take it easy, be smart and work towards the long-term
    > > goals of full recovery and health. Don't worsen
    > your
    > > situation by trying to force undue stress on your back until you know
    what
    > > cause so many herniated disks and correct that situation, loose some
    > weight,
    > > strengthen the abs and back, and start with some low impact sports until
    > you
    > > are confident of the muscles supporting the back to buffer the strain on
    > the
    > > discs. Better safe than sorry; slow and sure. Good luck with your recovery!
    > >
    > > Jeff
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  17. Tim Axtelle

    Tim Axtelle Guest

    "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of multi-sport events that don't
    > include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored doing the same old
    > thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of the duathlons I've
    > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?

    Get a second opinion. I have had 2 discectomies and still do triathlon. I do limit run
    training, however.

    The neurosurgeon who did my first operation (old school) told me that I needn't limit my activity
    after recovery from surgery and I continued to do sprint distance races without problems.

    I had my sights set on my first Olympic distance when I ruptured my disc again lifting carpet. The
    NS who did my second operation (first one retired) told me that I needed to take 8 weeks off of work
    (desk job) and give up running AND cycling permanently. I thought that this was way too conservative
    and decided to take my first doctor's advice. Although I don't recommend this, I did my first
    Olympic distance race 12 weeks after my second operation.

    Running can be somewhat uncomfortable for me. As a result, I do less frequent run training than I
    used to and have come to accept that my run times will not likely improve. However, the extra
    attention to swim and bike times has paid off.

    I would tend to believe that the extra 15 lbs lbs more of a risk to your back and your overall
    health than continuing to train for triathlon with some modifications to your regimen.
     
  18. Want great info on bad backs?

    Try www.microlaserdiscectomy.com

    "Chris Mumford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]com

    > I've always loved doing triathlons, but about two years ago my back went out, and it turns out
    > that I have two degenerated disks - one of them is herniated. My doctor says, "running is out".
    > Since then I've reduced my workouts and subsequently put on 15 pounds!
    >
    >
    >
    > I've been looking for an alternative to triathlons in search of multi-sport events that don't
    > include running. Heck they don't even have to be multi-sport. I just get bored doing the same old
    > thing which is why I haven't become a biker (never much of a swimmer). Most of the duathlons I've
    > seen are run+bike. Does anybody have any suggestions?

    --
    Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
     
  19. Hi: I have recommended the "UltraBack Back videotape program for 8 years and have had great results.
    www.fitcentric.com to purchase online. Ken Burres MD spine surgeon
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > You can find more info, and a list of Mckenzie certified practitioners, at www.mckenziemdt.org.
    > > There's also a book written by Robin Mckenzie called ''treat your own back"
    > >
    > > Mike B.

    > > > Could someone define for me the McKenzie exercises? It's quite
    > probable
    > > > that they are the same exercises prescribed by my PT but I was just
    > unaware
    > > > they have a name?

    --
    Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
     
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