Bad day for my bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Niv, Jun 7, 2003.

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  1. Niv

    Niv Guest

    Well, not that bad, nice enjoayable 45 mile jaunt. However, firstly one bottle cage came unscrewed &
    couldn't fine my 4mm Allen key, so it had to dangle about on its last remaing, loose, screw. Then,
    about 15 miles from home..... BANG, what the h*** was that.

    100 yards later, with me struggling to move forward, got off to investigate, broken spoke. I didn't
    realise they made so much noise breaking.

    Anyway, slackened off rear brake & got home OK.

    Now for the repair. Any hints anyone. I built the wheels from scratch about 18 months ago, but
    spokes & rims were all new. What should I do for one broken spoke? Do slacken all off a lot, replace
    spoke, and then re-true as if I was starting over, or what?

    TIA, Niv.
     
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  2. John B

    John B Guest

    Niv wrote:

    > Well, not that bad, nice enjoayable 45 mile jaunt.
    >
    > Then, about 15 miles from home..... BANG, what the h*** was that.
    >
    > 100 yards later, with me struggling to move forward, got off to investigate, broken spoke. I
    > didn't realise they made so much noise breaking.
    >
    > Anyway, slackened off rear brake & got home OK.
    >
    > Now for the repair. Any hints anyone. I built the wheels from scratch about 18 months ago, but
    > spokes & rims were all new. What should I do for one broken spoke? Do slacken all off a lot,
    > replace spoke, and then re-true as if I was starting over, or what?
    >

    Remove the broken spoke if you haven't already. Reduce tension in the two spokes each side of the
    broken one. That should enable you to have a true wheel without compromising strength to allow you
    to continue riding (assuming you don't already have a new spoke). Remember to adjust your rear brake
    before riding again.

    Replace missing spoke asap and re-true using same principles you used when you built the wheel.

    Unless the rim is actually damaged you should not have any problems.

    John B
     
  3. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Sat, 7 Jun 2003 20:44:03 +0100, "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Now for the repair. Any hints anyone. I built the wheels from scratch about 18 months ago, but
    >spokes & rims were all new. What should I do for one broken spoke?

    Fix it (drive side rear, I take it ?). Stuff one in, tension it up and the wheel ought to pull right
    back into shape. Truing should be minimal.

    But a spoke shouldn't break at 18 months, so there's something funny about the wheel build. You
    might want to look at that. Did you stress relieve them ?

    A look at www.sheldonbrown.com and Jobst's book wouldn't hurt.
     
  4. Niv

    Niv Guest

    I built them following Sheldons instructions & I've read Jobst's book several times. I'm hoping it
    was just a rogue spoke. The wheels have been "true" for the whole 18 months without any need for
    re-truing, despite some very large pot-hole encounters. Thanks for advice anyway. Niv. "Andy
    Dingley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 7 Jun 2003 20:44:03 +0100, "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Now for the repair. Any hints anyone. I built the wheels from scratch
    about
    > >18 months ago, but spokes & rims were all new. What should I do for one broken spoke?
    >
    > Fix it (drive side rear, I take it ?). Stuff one in, tension it up and the wheel ought to pull
    > right back into shape. Truing should be minimal.
    >
    > But a spoke shouldn't break at 18 months, so there's something funny about the wheel build. You
    > might want to look at that. Did you stress relieve them ?
    >
    > A look at www.sheldonbrown.com and Jobst's book wouldn't hurt.
     
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