BAD Dog Owners

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by noonievut, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    How many times have you been chased by a dog?

    I've been riding for 2 years and have probably been chased 5 times. I'll tell you, this is not a pleasent experience. I've not had this result in a crash (knock on wood), but if I ever do I'll have myself a new house (after the law suit...and I don't even live in the US). But seriously, I don't understand why a dog owner would not have their dogs on a leash if around their property (extend the leash to property limits)...I've almost seen dogs hit by cars because of this.

    Has anyone ever stopped (instead of pedalling your a$$ off) and tried to calm the dog down, maybe pet the dog, or is this a bad idea?
     
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  2. Chance3290

    Chance3290 New Member

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    I've had a lot of dogs chase after me, but none have ever attacked. Most dogs that chase bikes do so because its something to do, sort of a game. Now some dogs will chase and attack. If you can't tell which are playing and which want to take a chunk out of your thigh, you had better assume they're all after you and you need to pedal faster.
    If I see a dog on the road in front of me that might be rowdy, I yell and pedal towards the dog. They usually run off. Now that 'usually' part might come back and literally bite me in the ass one day.
    The only way to avoid dogs completely is to put the bike on a trainer and stay in the garage...or wear a dog suit and they'll all think you are one of them.
     
  3. SBSpartan

    SBSpartan New Member

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    Sounds like dogs really like you. Is there a part of the story that you are leaving out?
     
  4. ohgodnooo!

    ohgodnooo! New Member

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    I commute in a rural area where dogs are as common as drunk rednecks in pickup trucks, theres one in every driveway. Usually they just yelp a little and chase me until I'm past their owners property. But every once in a while I run across a perticularly stupid mutt (Lab) who chases barking and acting like they want to run into my front wheel. Hissing is surprisingly effective. If they get too
    close like they want to nip at my legs a sideways kick is a good deterent.
    A couple of times I was chased by small groups of really obnoxious country dogs ( young dobermans an some Lab variant) whose barking alone made me want to shoot them. I hopped off the bike to throw rocks a them and by the looks on their faces and confused behavior you'd think I had dropped my pants in front of a church congregation of teenage girls. Actually getting off the bike for some reason really gets them, but for your own safe sake I would just hiss at them or wait them out. Unless it's a Lab, then pray for the dark lord to strike them dead. God I hate Labs.
     
  5. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    LOL...the other day it was a lab. Yesterday I passed a house with 2 dobermans (I've had run-ins with them before). They're huge! Anyway, I was on the other side of the road, then noticed me last minute and were running on the other side of the road in my direction barking like mad. If I was on their side of the road, it might have been ugly :(
     
  6. Cyclesafe

    Cyclesafe New Member

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    There is a lab-mix dog owner down the street who says "sorry" every time his dog gets loose to chase me on the street while I'm riding my bike or when walking on the opposite side of the street to go to our communal mailbox. I told him "sorry" wasn't good enough since the attacks (growling, baring teeth, blocking my way - no bites yet) continue. Every time I wait until the dog gets close, then I jump towards the dog and scream "bad owner", which serves to deflect the charge.

    Since humor didn't seem to work and after my wife was similarly attacked, I contacted our county animal control officer who came by with a warning. The attacks continued so I kept a log and called the officer once again.

    I found out that here in San Diego County there is a fine levied for unrestrained dogs only if the officer personally views the incident, however, I can submit a sworn statement and agree to come to court. If the dog bites and serious injures a human, the dog is deemed a dangerous animal and the owner is required to get special insurance if they chose to keep the pet. If the bite does not cause serious injury, the dog gets one free bite every two years to avoid the dangerous animal designation.

    Meanwhile the owner has poisoned my neighbors against me, by saying that I hate all dogs. Little children start crying when they are walking their dogs (on a leash) and I happen by. Actually, I object to dog owners not taking responsibility for their pets by keeping them restrained on a leash, confined to their property, and preferably well behaved. I probably even wouldn't care about any of this if the consequence of the owner's negligence wasn't a standoff every time I ride by his house or walk to the mailbox.

    I have a feeling that nothing good is going to happen.

    If you are going downhill, you can outrun a dog. Otherwise, escape is unlikely. If you get away from a 25 mph dog its because he let you get away. With most dogs, chasing bikes seems to be a game and you can either play along (my choice), or if you are tired or feeling threatened stop with the bike between you and the dog and either make friends (my choice) or scream at the dog (sometimes the only option) and walk out of the dog's perceived territory, respectively. In the latter situation, forget about the owner coming out of the house. He is probably watching through the windows and laughing his ass off.

    Pepper spray is then a good option, but I have never felt the that rare occasions it might be useable was worth the hasstle of carrying it around all the time.
     
  7. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    And I thought I have it bad...

    It's not even so much as the dog biting me that's scary, though it is, it's the accident that can be caused because of the dog running on the road and me having to drive on the other side of the road to avoid.

    Yesterday I drove by a house and the dog was sitting on the driveway just watching me go by, no reaction at all. I guess that's the sign of a good owner (ok, some reaction would've fine, but not a chase beyond property limits).
     
  8. lehowe0

    lehowe0 New Member

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    A big ol' country dog chasing you upill and barking threatingly is one ofthe most unnerveing experiences you can have (except for a crash). It's fairly rare, but you never forget it. I keep a can of Halt for these occasions.

    For most dogs, I just yell "No" at them in a commanding voice and it's enough.

    I got off my bike once and held the bike between me and the dog so he couldn't get at me. This will not work for two dogs.
     
  9. snaps10

    snaps10 New Member

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    mace (pepper spray) a dog once and they will not come after you again. just be careful, if it blow on you it hurts like the dickens. just grab a few cans next time youre at the grocery store, hit every dog on your route, and youre good to go.:D when i first got a co2 system, and pulled the pump off my bike i was showing my dad (my dad is anti-anythingprogressiveincycling. he still rides with downtube shifters and old-style time pedals) the first thing he said was, "what'r you gonna swing at the dogs now?":D
     
  10. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    I used to ride a lot out in the country, where loose dogs are common. Usually either I saw a dog early enough to plan my move (sometimes even walking the bike past the property), or he saw me late enough that I could safely outgun him. But I had two bad incidents, in which dogs caught me by surprise. The first, a big German Shepherd, was on my back wheel out of nowhere, and he was serious. It happened too quickly for me to stop, and as I attempted a desperate sprint, he was biting the back of my shoe. He was able to gnaw for a few seconds before he dropped back. I ended up with several bite marks on the shoe.


    The second incident happened while I was riding in a new rural area. I was buzzing by a house with hedges alongside the road, and as I went by the entrance opening in the hedges a dog burst out at me from the side. He had seen me coming and had hidden until he made his move. I have to believe this wasn't the first time. Instinctively I swerved toward the other side of the road and got by him. His thing was the initial scare, not the chase. Had traffic been coming toward me, or behind me, I might not be writing this.

    It finally took a raccoon last year to dart out in front of me and bring me down, putting me on crutches for three weeks.
     
  11. Tenspeeder

    Tenspeeder New Member

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    I've now become one of the select few who have been chased by a dog during our daily cycles. My variation of the story:

    I cycle to and from work...10KM each trip through rural areas. My bike light has become a blessing, seeing as though there barely any street lights on the way.

    Now, yesterday...as I was heading past a property that has their dogs loose every night (though behind gates and chicken wire so that their Jack Russell can't escape) I heard the dogs barking. No big deal, seeing as though they do it every day. However...I heard one od the dogs following. I pumped faster, and yelled at the dog at the top of my lungs with a line of obscenities. The dog, once it passed its property, ceased the persuit...but my heart was beating a mile a minute.

    With no offence to the dog owners and those self-righteous "WE MUST LOVE ALL ANIMALS! DEATH TO ANIMAL HATERS! HAVE YOU HUGGED A ROTTWEILER TODAY"? people...what can I do (legally) to ensure this doesn't happen again? I mean...it would be great to be able to nail this dog upside the head with my steeltoed boots as he's coming near, or spray him with a repellant, but I'd like to focus on the legal alternatives.

    All I want is to be left alone as I cycle home after a long shift at work.

     
  12. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    Find out if there is a law in your area about dogs being on a leash (specifically around their house). The excuse of the dog is on its property, so a leash isn't required, is crap.

    80% of the time the dogs that are not on leashes don't move when I go by, 50% of the one's on leashes want to eat me, but it's the 20% not on leashes that chase are the issue.
     
  13. rule62

    rule62 New Member

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    Chased a few times, attacked twice - both of which were right in my neighborhood. My daughter and boyfriend have been chased a few times as well, and were just attacked by a pit bull out on a ride in their neighborhood in Austin.

    All three of those times were when we had stopped or slowed because of the dog and or owner was already blocking our path. Every time that we have kept going or sprinted through it we have done a lot better. I have kicked the crap out of a couple of dogs that had the angle on me or surprise attacked from just off of the road with good results.
    And yeah talking to the corner vet, most of these dogs are indeed the ones who end up getting hit by cars sooner or later, in my neighborhood and in general.

    I live in a rural area, so I deal with the Sheriff and county animal countrol on such issues. They take dog attacks really seriously from what I have experienced, definitely to the point that they get the owners involved and answerable. More and more are going in front of judges too.
     
  14. cavedog

    cavedog New Member

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    If a dog attacks you, get a lawyer. If the dog owner is a homeowner, his insurance will include liablility coverage, usually $100,000 US here in 'Merica. Medical payments is a seperate coverage and usually written at $5000, so your medical bills should be covered under that. Go for the punitive damages. His insurance carrier will either non renew him, or raise his rates unless he gets rid of the dog. Hit 'em in the wallet, that is sure to get their attention.

    I worked for a insurance company for a couple of years. Learned more than I want to know about property and auto insurance.
     
  15. Fetus

    Fetus New Member

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    I've been chased by dogs a fair share of times. On one occassion I thought I would play around and lead the dog on seeing how the dog was "fenced in". BIG mistake... as the dog approached the end of the fence line he broke through it and started chasing me down :eek: . It was quite a rush! The dog got within about 20 feet of my back tire but I was able to pull away from him. I know this wasn't the smartest idea in the world, but after 40 miles of riding I don't think I was really using my head in this situation. It did provide good motivation though :D

    To answer your question about stopping and trying to calm the dog down: From some of my past experiences, I've noticed that when I did stop (mind you, I've NEVER tried to calm down a dobermen or rotweiller), usualy the dog will calm down quite easily. I think it's just natures instinct for a dog to try and chase you down if you're running from it.
    Keep in mind though, if the dog looks pi$$ed... run like hell! Most dogs wont run too far away from their home.
     
  16. rooman

    rooman New Member

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    it's nonsense right...this attitude perpetuates the craziness of litigation and feeds lawyers...is society right in the head?...or is it some basic societal paranoia that everything is solved by suing the ass of anyone and getting insurers to pay up?...

    we have to take some responsibility for ourself.

    As for animals, understand that animals, wild or domestic all act out of fear, self preservation and especially in the case of dogs, to protect their pack leader and their territory. It is normal for them to react when spooked or if driven by some catalyst that demands their attention for flight or fight.

    dogs may not always be friendly towards us if they dont know us, they may re-act unexpectedly...

    the bottom line is take responsibility for yourself, ride accordingly, ride defensively, expect the unexpected... from dogs, cars, other cyclists.

    If there were no road signs, no road painted lines, no air bags or seat belts, no fences and no cliff side barriers, it wouldnt take too long for the lesser idiots to remove themselves from the gene pool and the survivors be a much more careful and practical group. Imagine if you drove a car with a sharp spike embedded in the dash board aimed straight at your head and knowing that if you hit anything you would be instantly dead...you would go to great pains not to hit anythig right?

    Every animal goes though life knowing that every turn for them could mean death....we on the otherhand rely on our insurers, lawyers and beaurocrats to create padding around us, for a soft fall.

    Cyclists at least know that our chosen passion is inherently dangerous, but that we do it because it is good for us, our society and our world. It is the attitude and behaviours of others that makes it more dangerous than it need be... but suing the dog owner is a short sighted fix ....its a bigger picture...dogs are OK, just understand they are just as scared as you of getting hit by a car, ( or beaten by a human), and they give unquestioning loyalty with brown sad eyes that have feelings behind them...

    OK I am not a dog owner anymore...but they (dogs) arent the problem...owners on the other hand...sheesh.
     
  17. Tenspeeder

    Tenspeeder New Member

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    I took this question to two people I trust: Angela and Helga. Angela is my girlfriend, and Helga is the foreman at the factory I work in, and a really good friend.

    Helga's response: she said that it doesn't matter what you do, just as long as there are no witnesses. I hope she was joking. :)

    Angela's response: use a water pistol and aim it at their nose. Dogs hate water at their muzzles.

    I found it funny that the police (yes, the f'n POLICE!) don't know what to do in this situation. Damn country bumpkin local police. Useless people...it just reminds me of the classic joke:

    Q: Why do cops travel in pairs?
    A: Because pigs have four legs.
     
  18. bmclaughlin807

    bmclaughlin807 New Member

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    I have two dogs, lab mixes. They're frequently out without leashes but NEVER out of my sight, and they're very well behaved, and well trained. They'd never chase a cyclist. They're just not at all interested in someone moving that fast, as there's no way that they'll stop to pet them!

    It really is the owner's fault, not the dogs. Unfortunately, the good owners get saddled with extra laws, regulations, rules because of all the idiots that shouldn't be allowed to breathe, much less own a pet!
     
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