Barley for Babies

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Phoebe & Allyso, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I eat wheat or oats. We'd like
    to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption by both of
    us. The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed it to her.
    If she's fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she reacts, we quit.

    I need some baby-friendly barley recipes. She can't have dairy (of any variety, due to known
    allergy), peanuts / tree nuts / seeds, shellfish, soy, wheat or oats. She does fine with rice,
    potato, apple, banana, pear, sweet potato, orange squash, carrot, celery, and beets. Anything else
    is negotiable, but I'm unlikely to give her any highly allergenic food, or the acidic foods
    (tomatoes, citrus, etc.) that give even older kids trouble.

    She has no pincer grip, so finger food has to be in big enough chunks to stick out of her fist.
    She's not a big fan of texture unless it's a finger food or she can take bites off it while someone
    else holds it. I think she'll be able to gum up cooked barley if she likes it. The goal isn't to get
    large quantities into her; just some every day.

    Thanks!

    Phoebe :)
     
    Tags:


  2. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Phoebe & Allyson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I eat wheat or oats. We'd
    > like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption by
    > both of us. The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed
    > it to her. If she's fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she
    > reacts, we quit.
    >
    > I need some baby-friendly barley recipes. She can't have dairy (of any variety, due to known
    > allergy), peanuts / tree nuts / seeds, shellfish, soy, wheat or oats. She does fine with rice,
    > potato, apple, banana, pear, sweet potato, orange squash, carrot, celery, and beets. Anything else
    > is negotiable, but I'm unlikely to give her any highly allergenic food, or the acidic foods
    > (tomatoes, citrus, etc.) that give even older kids trouble.
    >
    > She has no pincer grip, so finger food has to be in big enough chunks to stick out of her fist.
    > She's not a big fan of texture unless it's a finger food or she can take bites off it while
    > someone else holds it. I think she'll be able to gum up cooked barley if she likes it. The goal
    > isn't to get large quantities into her; just some every day.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Phoebe :)
    >

    I'd read somewhere on this newsgroup in the past that anyone who was allergic to wheat would also
    most likely react to barley.

    Tried rice?

    K.

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  3. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    Phoebe & Allyson wrote:
    > Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I eat wheat or oats. We'd
    > like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption by
    > both of us. The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed
    > it to her. If she's fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she
    > reacts, we quit.
    >
    > I need some baby-friendly barley recipes. She can't have dairy (of any variety, due to known
    > allergy), peanuts / tree nuts / seeds, shellfish, soy, wheat or oats. She does fine with rice,
    > potato, apple, banana, pear, sweet potato, orange squash, carrot, celery, and beets. Anything else
    > is negotiable, but I'm unlikely to give her any highly allergenic food, or the acidic foods
    > (tomatoes, citrus, etc.) that give even older kids trouble.
    >
    > She has no pincer grip, so finger food has to be in big enough chunks to stick out of her fist.
    > She's not a big fan of texture unless it's a finger food or she can take bites off it while
    > someone else holds it. I think she'll be able to gum up cooked barley if she likes it. The goal
    > isn't to get large quantities into her; just some every day.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Phoebe :)
    >

    Hi Phoebe, Why did you pick barley? It contains a lot more gluten than oats.

    Try rice. Especially brown rice, because it more nutritous than white rice, and stickier so it will
    be easier to eat using ones fingers.

    Best regards, Bob
     
  4. Katra wrote:

    > I'd read somewhere on this newsgroup in the past that anyone who was allergic to wheat would also
    > most likely react to barley.

    But that leaves us with rye as the only remaining source of gluten to try, and I'm not sure *I* can
    tolerate 6 weeks of rye.

    > Tried rice?

    She doesn't have a problem with rice, but it doesn't have any gluten, and in order to get accurate
    test results for celiac, she has to be consuming gluten.

    Phoebe :)
     
  5. zxcvbob wrote:

    > Why did you pick barley? It contains a lot more gluten than oats.

    Because I can't feed her wheat or oats, I can't imagine eating straight rye for 6 weeks, and
    barley is the only common gluten-containing grain left. She has to consume gluten for the blood
    test to be accurate.

    > Try rice. Especially brown rice, because it more nutritous than white rice, and stickier so it
    > will be easier to eat using ones fingers.

    She likes rice. Rice doesn't solve the problem. If you have a tasty recipe for rye-based baby food,
    that'd work, though.

    Phoebe :)
     
  6. SportKite1

    SportKite1 Guest

    >From: Phoebe & Allyson

    >The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed it to her.

    Purchase some whole barley (purchase at a health food store), not pearl barley, and cook it
    similarly to rice until softened. Give it a whirl in the food processor with a bit of the cooking
    water to smooth it out. You might even sweeten it with a bit of barley syrup (also available at
    health food stores in bulk) to make it a bit more palatable.

    Ellen
     
  7. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Phoebe & Allyson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I eat wheat or oats. We'd
    > like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption by
    > both of us. The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed
    > it to her. If she's fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she
    > reacts, we quit.
    >
    > I need some baby-friendly barley recipes. She can't have dairy (of any variety, due to known
    > allergy), peanuts / tree nuts / seeds, shellfish, soy, wheat or oats. She does fine with rice,
    > potato, apple, banana, pear, sweet potato, orange squash, carrot, celery, and beets. Anything else
    > is negotiable, but I'm unlikely to give her any highly allergenic food, or the acidic foods
    > (tomatoes, citrus, etc.) that give even older kids trouble.
    >
    > She has no pincer grip, so finger food has to be in big enough chunks to stick out of her fist.
    > She's not a big fan of texture unless it's a finger food or she can take bites off it while
    > someone else holds it. I think she'll be able to gum up cooked barley if she likes it. The goal
    > isn't to get large quantities into her; just some every day.
    >
    Phoebe,

    Barley is a forbidden food for celiacs. Please don't try it.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  8. Cindy Fuller wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Phoebe & Allyson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> We'd like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption
    >> by both of us.

    > Barley is a forbidden food for celiacs. Please don't try it.

    Heck, even adults with much more definitive symptoms aren't advised to go gluten-free without an
    intestinal biopsy (or at least positive bloodwork) , and babies who are diagnosed before the age of
    2 are advised to have a gluten challenge followed by biopsy sometime after the age of 2 to rule out
    transient gluten intolerance.

    Not to mention the chance that she's allergic to wheat. Since oats are a big question-mark and the
    odds of cross-contamination with wheat are high, the only reason I'd suspect celiac over a wheat
    allergy is family history - and family history isn't a very good predictor.

    Phoebe :)
    --
    yahoo address is unread; substitute mailbolt
     
  9. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 10:22:58 -0600, Phoebe & Allyson <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I eat wheat or oats. We'd
    >like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption by
    >both of us. The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed
    >it to her. If she's fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she
    >reacts, we quit.

    do you really need the test? I mean you know she has problems with wheat and such why do you need a
    test telling you there is a problem? I am in the same boat I have problems now with wheat and corn.
    but to get the test I would end up pretty sick. so I rather just do what works (remove those items)
    then get a test and then remove those items. one thing in my searching I found Kefir really helps in
    allergy problems relating to food. the stuff tastes good too (G)

    --
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    toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  10. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    Steve Knight wrote in message ...
    >On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 10:22:58 -0600, Phoebe & Allyson <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    >>Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I
    eat
    >>wheat or oats. We'd like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of
    >>gluten consumption by both of us. The plan is for me
    to try
    >>barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed it to her. If
    she's
    >>fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she reacts, we quit.
    >
    >do you really need the test? I mean you know she has problems with wheat
    and
    >such why do you need a test telling you there is a problem? I am in the same boat I have problems
    >now with wheat and corn. but to get
    the
    >test I would end up pretty sick. so I rather just do what works (remove those items) then get
    >a test and
    then
    >remove those items. one thing in my searching I found Kefir really helps in allergy problems
    >relating to food. the stuff tastes good too (G)

    Kefir is awesome! i like the plain stuff, but alot of people buy the fruit flavored stuff we sell.

    --
    Saerah

    TANSTAAFL

    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing
    swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive
    power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some
    farcical aquatic ceremony."
     
  11. Miche

    Miche Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'd read somewhere on this newsgroup in the past that anyone who was allergic to wheat would also
    > most likely react to barley.

    It's likely but not a 100% correlation. I react to wheat but not to the other gluten-
    containing grains.

    Miche

    --
    If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud. -- Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Restaurant"
     
  12. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Phoebe & Allyson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    > > I'd read somewhere on this newsgroup in the past that anyone who was allergic to wheat would
    > > also most likely react to barley.
    >
    > But that leaves us with rye as the only remaining source of gluten to try, and I'm not sure *I*
    > can tolerate 6 weeks of rye.
    >
    > > Tried rice?
    >
    > She doesn't have a problem with rice, but it doesn't have any gluten, and in order to get accurate
    > test results for celiac, she has to be consuming gluten.
    >
    > Phoebe :)
    >

    Ah, so you are trying to expose her to gluten? Just use cream of wheat...

    K.

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  13. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Phoebe & Allyson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Our DD (9 months old) has a family history of celiac, and reacts when I eat wheat or oats. We'd
    > > like to get her tested for celiac, but the blood test requires 6 weeks of gluten consumption by
    > > both of us. The plan is for me to try barley, and if she isn't bothered by me eating it, to feed
    > > it to her. If she's fine with that, then we both stick with it until the test is done. If she
    > > reacts, we quit.
    > >
    > > I need some baby-friendly barley recipes. She can't have dairy (of any variety, due to known
    > > allergy), peanuts / tree nuts / seeds, shellfish, soy, wheat or oats. She does fine with rice,
    > > potato, apple, banana, pear, sweet potato, orange squash, carrot, celery, and beets. Anything
    > > else is negotiable, but I'm unlikely to give her any highly allergenic food, or the acidic foods
    > > (tomatoes, citrus, etc.) that give even older kids trouble.
    > >
    > > She has no pincer grip, so finger food has to be in big enough chunks to stick out of her fist.
    > > She's not a big fan of texture unless it's a finger food or she can take bites off it while
    > > someone else holds it. I think she'll be able to gum up cooked barley if she likes it. The goal
    > > isn't to get large quantities into her; just some every day.
    > >
    > Phoebe,
    >
    > Barley is a forbidden food for celiacs. Please don't try it.
    >
    > Cindy

    What I'm wondering is why she wants to push it? If the baby has already shown an allergy to wheat,
    what is she trying to prove?

    K.

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  14. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    Phoebe & Allyson wrote:

    > She has no pincer grip, so finger food has to be in big enough chunks to stick out of her fist.
    > She's not a big fan of texture unless it's a finger food or she can take bites off it while
    > someone else holds it. I think she'll be able to gum up cooked barley if she likes it. The goal
    > isn't to get large quantities into her; just some every day.

    Barley is, for me, pretty tough. Gerber, as I recall, has one of those instant cereal flakes made of
    barley. By nine months my guy, an early eater of non-milk, got soft cubes of cooked veggies in a
    paste made of such instant cereal mixed in with a little Gerber organic cauliflower and brocc. paste
    (his favourite, now he won't touch it). If I were to try and give barley in a non-instant flake to
    that age group, I'd "chip it" (grind it very very coarsely) in a grain mill and cook a long time in
    broth, even pressure cook it. Our "natural groceries" (those slick huge things that grew out of the
    food co-ops I used to us back in the 70's) have rolled barley, like rolled oats. For baby I'd use
    pearled not "pot barley". I find that tends to make even adults windy. blacksalt
     
  15. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    Phoebe & Allyson wrote:

    > Thanks!
    >
    > Phoebe :)

    Oh, and I've had "barley" grits, gotten at a Ukranian store. Perhaps you could make "real" kasha
    (as opposed to the word kasha meaning buckwheat). Here is a cut and paste of a post of mine from
    years ago. You could use almond milk instead of cow milk, or, if you are pumping, breast milk.
    This was delicious and *soft*: <begin paste> With a recipe from an rfcer in hand, I made my first
    Kasha today.

    I discovered that I had no double boiler approaching the size I needed, so I took a Belgique (sp?)
    stock pot and plopped a curvy Belgique saute pan on top. I really steamed it for 6 hours, and was
    interested in how the dish changed with time, it's final sea-change at about 0500 hours. It became a
    very thick dish. I thought that it would require salt, but it did not, and I didn't have cream, but
    I think that butter (or perhaps cream) is necessary for enjoyment. I used 1/2 a teaspoon for a cup
    of the final product and that little bit's flavour really shone through, so use a good butter. The
    Barley, although very soft at the end, kept it's character of that little vermis of fibre running
    it's length. The milk, though totally dried and adhered to the barely, had little flavour, and did
    not take on a kheer-like character. Of course it would have been different with water or oil, but I
    don't think a fundamental browning of the milk proteins is a central part of this dish I liked this
    just plain, but I sense a heavy peppering and/or a blob of jam heading towards the Hubs bowl. tj
    p.s. I just couldn't refrain from peeking and tasting.
    p.p.s. I have a very odd cat that NEVER touches human food. She'll wolf down tuna from a can, but
    has never taken a lap of milk, or a bite of salmon, or swipe at the butter. Never! After I
    finished my bowl, I set it down on the table near her (we're all jammed up next to the
    computer). She arose from slumber, stretched extravagently, and then PLUNGED her face into
    the empty bowl, cleaning the sides. I think this speaks volumes.

    <begin quote of recipe:>

    Barley Kasha

    This kind of kasha was Peter the Great's favourite. Try making it sometime - I think you'll be
    surprised. It takes a _lot_ of time to make, but requires very little actual work. Take note
    that it is extremely important to maintain the proportions of the ingredients both for soaking
    and for cooking.

    1 glass (200 g/7.05 oz) pearl barley (large-sized) 1 litre (1.06 qt) water for soaking 2 litres
    (2.11 qt) milk some heavy cream and butter

    Soak the barley in cold water for 10-12 hours. Drain. Heat the milk in a non-reactive saucepan to
    40° C/104°F and add the barley. Heat on stove top, uncovered, until the milk boils. Meanwhile boil
    water in a large saucepan. As soon as the milk is boiling, cover the saucepan and place it in the
    large saucepan with boiling water, i.e. bain-marie. Cook for 6 hours, adding water to the large
    saucepan if needed. Refrain from opening the kasha saucepan. Take from heat and let stand for 10
    minutes. Remove the kasha from the saucepan and put it into a porcelain dish. Add a bit of cream and
    butter and stir very carefully until the consistency is uniform. Eat, preferably as a stand-alone
    dish. <end paste> HTH blacksalt
     
  16. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    Phoebe & Allyson wrote:
    >

    > She likes rice. Rice doesn't solve the problem. If you have a tasty recipe for rye-based baby
    > food, that'd work, though.
    >
    > Phoebe :)

    I'm glad you're smiling. Sometimes it is best to just post a specific question and not give the why
    behind it a chance to bring out social commentary. I'm still getting used to the pinched looks I get
    for my life with baby. I'm an oddball, and people seem pretty tolerate of it, but be an oddball with
    a baby and all their reactionariness comes out.

    murderous marine (because I don't cut his hair, don't mind pink stuff on him...and he has such a
    "girlish face" people call him her even in Builder Bob outfits... and have him do very physical
    things, "hardening" things, which he loves and never acts sore or injured from, and I let him get
    very muddy and grubby. Even if it is only 50 out, and his sleeves are soaked, any happy running
    child who screams when it is time to come in is warm enough to stand 30 minutes outside). I just
    sigh and remember I live in the kind of place where people say, without a blink, that there are more
    mentally retarded children born from "mixed" marriages. A mother needs the heart of mama cat and the
    hide of hippo. Best of luck. blacksalt
     
  17. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (SportKite1) wrote:

    > >From: "Saerah"
    >
    > >Kefir is awesome! i like the plain stuff, but alot of people buy the fruit flavored stuff
    > >we sell.
    >
    > I wish I could FIND plain Kefir without all the additives.
    >
    > Ellen
    >
    >

    Uh, make your own??? What is kefir but thinned yogurt?

    K.

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  18. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    SportKite1 wrote in message <[email protected]>...
    >>From: Katra
    >
    >>Uh, make your own??? What is kefir but thinned yogurt?
    >>
    >>K.
    >
    >It's different. But I meant, to stock in my store. Lifeway brand has too
    many
    >additives and Helios is unavailable in my area.

    the lifeway is gross, IMO. helios is fantastic, and in addition to no additives, is organic.

    --
    Saerah

    TANSTAAFL

    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing
    swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive
    power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some
    farcical aquatic ceremony."
     
  19. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On 28 Feb 2004 12:44:45 GMT, [email protected] (SportKite1) wrote:

    >>From: "Saerah"
    >
    >>Kefir is awesome! i like the plain stuff, but alot of people buy the fruit flavored stuff we sell.
    >
    >I wish I could FIND plain Kefir without all the additives.
    >

    i am going to make it. it's dirt easy to do. You need to find some kefir grains.
    http://users.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefirpage.html#Where_to_get_kefir_grains I found three people to
    get them from.

    --
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  20. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 00:08:39 -0500, "Saerah" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Kefir is awesome! i like the plain stuff, but alot of people buy the fruit flavored stuff we sell.

    I am working on getting the grains to make it. very easy to do. far easier then yogurt.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See http://www.knight-
    toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
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