Bashing large chainring

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Tacomaboy, May 30, 2003.

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  1. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

    Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The large
    aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the chain
    still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the chainring teeth. My
    question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this problem (ie am I
    doing something wrong or does my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying
    one and swapping it in/out with my normal chain ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is
    it better to get a bash ring and swap it out, or get a chain ring guard, which I assume will lower
    my clearance even further (but not require me to swap it out constantly).
     
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  2. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

    Oh BTW, what measurements do I need to take if I order a bash ring? I know I will need to
    count teeth.

    "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the
    > chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the chainring
    > teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this problem
    > (ie am I doing something wrong or
    does
    > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > with my normal
    chain
    > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it out,
    > or get a chain ring guard, which I assume will lower my clearance even further (but not require me
    > to swap it out constantly).
     
  3. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the
    > chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the chainring
    > teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this problem
    > (ie am I doing something wrong or
    does
    > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > with my normal
    chain
    > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it out,
    > or get a chain ring guard, which I assume will lower my clearance even further (but not require me
    > to swap it out constantly).

    Proper technique will allow you to cross obstacles without touching the chainring. It involves
    popping the front wheel up on the obstacle, then throwing your weight forward to pop the rear wheel
    up. Ride with some more experienced riders and watch how they do it. It's definitely a necessary
    skill to learn.

    Inevitably though, the large chainring ends up being the bash ring by default. They will still work
    even with a huge flat spot since the chain has so many other teeth to use. They're only usually used
    for road transport anyway. I've taco'ed mine twice (as in teeth bent out 90 degrees), hammered it
    back and it still works fine.
     
  4. Technician

    Technician Guest

    TacomaBoy <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > Oh BTW, what measurements do I need to take if I order a bash ring? I know I will need to
    > count teeth.
    >
    >
    > "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately,
    > > the chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the
    > > chainring teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have
    > > this problem (ie am I doing something wrong or
    > does
    > > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > > with my normal
    > chain
    > > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it
    > > out, or get a chain ring guard, which I assume will lower my clearance even further (but not
    > > require me to swap it out constantly).
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >

    I thought you had to take the big ring off to put a bash ring on?
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  5. Technician

    Technician Guest

    John Harlow <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    >
    > > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately,
    > > the chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the
    > > chainring teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have
    > > this problem (ie am I doing something wrong or
    > does
    > > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > > with my normal
    > chain
    > > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it
    > > out, or get a chain ring guard, which I assume will lower my clearance even further (but not
    > > require me to swap it out constantly).
    >
    > Proper technique will allow you to cross obstacles without touching the chainring. It involves
    > popping the front wheel up on the obstacle, then throwing your weight forward to pop the rear
    > wheel up. Ride with some more experienced riders and watch how they do it. It's definitely a
    > necessary skill to learn.
    >
    > Inevitably though, the large chainring ends up being the bash ring by default. They will still
    > work even with a huge flat spot since the chain has so many other teeth to use. They're only
    > usually used for road transport anyway. I've taco'ed mine twice (as in teeth bent out 90 degrees),
    > hammered it back and it still works fine.
    >
    >
    >

    "They're only usually used for road transport anyway"

    right, i use mine quite a bit on trails. flats, and on some shallow climbs. so i guess that makes me
    unusual. ;-)
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  6. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > TacomaBoy <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > > Oh BTW, what measurements do I need to take if I order a bash ring? I
    know
    > > I will need to count teeth.
    > >
    > >
    > > "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into
    the
    > > > rocks yesterday. The large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the
    many
    > > > small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the chain still grips to
    the
    > > > ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the
    chainring
    > > > teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this
    > > > problem (ie am I doing something wrong or
    > > does
    > > > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > > > with my normal
    > > chain
    > > > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get
    a
    > > > bash ring and swap it out, or get a chain ring guard, which I assume
    will
    > > > lower my clearance even further (but not require me to swap it out constantly).
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    It looks like there are two types of bash rings, one that goes next to the large ring, but has a
    slightly bigger diameter, and one that replaces the chain ring.
     
  7. John Harlow wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >
    >Proper technique will allow you to cross obstacles without touching the chainring.
    >

    In some places perhaps. Around here, we got's ledges in bushels. I bach my chainring going up and
    down. Scraping a chainring on a ledges whilst going down it is a supremely uncomfortable feeling.

    I make my own bashrings out of big chainrings, and I do it while riding ;*)

    http://www.anthonysloan.com/nrscring.jpg

    Tacomaboy, There's a dud ethat posts on the mojo board named Bruzed who makes a bashguard called a
    City Park Condom. They are cheap and effective.

    A
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the
    > chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the chainring
    > teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this problem
    > (ie am I doing something wrong or does my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought
    > about buying one and swapping it in/out with my normal chain ring depending on where I am going to
    > ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it out, or get a chain ring guard, which I
    > assume will lower my clearance even further (but not require me to swap it out constantly).
    >
    >
    >

    The big ring is the bash ring as far as I'm concerned but if you want a big ring bash guard then all
    you ned to know is the number of teeth the rng has and the bolt pattern. In this case you need a
    104mm BDC 4 bolt guard for 42-44T rings. If you want to just get the bash guard that replaces the
    big ring then you need 104mm BCD 4 bolt there also.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  9. "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the
    > chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the chainring
    > teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this problem
    > (ie am I doing something wrong or
    does
    > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > with my normal
    chain
    > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it out,
    > or get a chain ring guard, which I assume will lower my clearance even further (but not require me
    > to swap it out constantly).

    I've used Rock Rings and now Black Spire's Ring God. Even if it's only trees I got sick of
    warping the big rings when it was used to propell the bike over a big obstacle. I rode my new
    bike once before losing teeth to some rocks. In some technical riding there's just no way you can
    miss them all.

    I don't remember have to count teeth so much as you need to specify the BCD. 4 bolt or 5 bolt. The
    new Shimano should be the 4 bolt 104mm BCD. Check out http://www.blackspire.com/prod_cguard.html

    Given the I do use the big ring frequently I chose to use the one that adds on outside the big ring.
    It does not reduce clearance more than an extra 2mm (maybe). Swapping out the big ring v.s. the bash
    guard would be way too much work. I would predict that you'd have the bash guard on when you need
    the big ring and the big ring on when you need the bash guard. Kind of defeats the purpose.

    Rob S
     
  10. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

  11. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    TacomaBoy wrote:
    > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately, the
    > chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the chainring
    > teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have this problem
    > (ie am I doing something wrong or does my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought
    > about buying one and swapping it in/out with my normal chain ring depending on where I am going to
    > ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it out, or get a chain ring guard, which I
    > assume will lower my clearance even further (but not require me to swap it out constantly).
    >

    I used to go through big chainrings a lot faster than I should. I put a tooth fairy on and now my
    big chainrings last forever and the tooth fairy has the scars to prove it :).

    I highly recommend the tooth fairy. I haven't used any of the others, but I like still having my
    large chainring.

    David
     
  12. Bugboy

    Bugboy Guest

    Around here we loose the third ring for a ring that protects the 2nd one and you get a bit more
    clearance.

    "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > TacomaBoy wrote:
    > > Just got my new Deore crank/chainring set installed and took it into the rocks yesterday. The
    > > large aluminum ring crunched nicely along the many small boulders I encountered. Fortunately,
    > > the chain still grips to the ring, but it looks like someone took a grinder to some of the
    > > chainring teeth. My question is this... do most of you use bash rings? Do most of you not have
    > > this problem (ie am I doing something wrong or
    does
    > > my bike have abnormally low clearance). I have thought about buying one and swapping it in/out
    > > with my normal
    chain
    > > ring depending on where I am going to ride. Also, is it better to get a bash ring and swap it
    > > out, or get a chain ring guard, which I assume
    will
    > > lower my clearance even further (but not require me to swap it out constantly).
    > >
    >
    > I used to go through big chainrings a lot faster than I should. I put a tooth fairy on and now my
    > big chainrings last forever and the tooth fairy has the scars to prove it :).
    >
    > I highly recommend the tooth fairy. I haven't used any of the others, but I like still having my
    > large chainring.
    >
    > David
     
  13. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Stephen Baker <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > bugboy t-p'ed:
    >
    > >Around here we loose the third ring for a ring that protects the 2nd one and you get a bit more
    > >clearance.
    > >
    >
    > Down here I just use the (steel) big ring as a bash ring. Didn't use the thing much anyway....
    >
    > Steve
    >

    Am i the only person to use the big ring much on the trails?
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  14. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Stephen Baker <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > > bugboy t-p'ed:
    > >
    > > >Around here we loose the third ring for a ring that protects the 2nd
    one and
    > > >you get a bit more clearance.
    > > >
    > >
    > > Down here I just use the (steel) big ring as a bash ring. Didn't use
    the thing
    > > much anyway....
    > >
    > > Steve
    > >
    >
    > Am i the only person to use the big ring much on the trails?
    > --
    > ~Travis
    >
    > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/

    The rest of us just like our knees.

    I use it on fireroads, or when racing. However, I'm definitely in the Hampster Wheel camp... spin
    spin spin spin spin spin!

    Jon Bond
     
  15. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Jon Bond <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    >
    > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Stephen Baker <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > > > bugboy t-p'ed:
    > > >
    > > > >Around here we loose the third ring for a ring that protects the 2nd
    > one and
    > > > >you get a bit more clearance.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Down here I just use the (steel) big ring as a bash ring. Didn't use
    > the thing
    > > > much anyway....
    > > >
    > > > Steve
    > > >
    > >
    > > Am i the only person to use the big ring much on the trails?
    > > --
    > > ~Travis
    > >
    > > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
    >
    > The rest of us just like our knees.
    >
    > I use it on fireroads, or when racing. However, I'm definitely in the Hampster Wheel camp... spin
    > spin spin spin spin spin!
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    >
    >

    Yeah, see, that's the difference. my legs are built for power, whereas your (and most others) are
    built for speed. I doubt no matter how hard i try i could get a "normal" speed cadence anymore. I
    just end up spinning out and my feet slip off the pedals. though i did file some nice teeth into the
    pedals so my feet don't slip when they are wet. i imagine they could be hell should skin come in
    contact with them in a crash, but i don't crash very often, and when i do, the bike and me seem to
    part ways rather quickly. i'm not one of those folks that hold on a death grip and ride it into the
    ground. i learned back when i had a dirt bike that it is safer to separate from the bike to minimize
    damage from entanglement.

    hmm, went off on a tangent again... (can you tell i have A.D.D.?)

    But back on subject, my knees don't bother, except for when i spin too fast. maybe i am just
    destined to be a power rider that's able to explode in a feat of power that could snap a chain with
    minimal effort and muscle up a climb... for a few minutes anyway, then i'm dead. maybe i am just
    simply destined for the singlespeed crowd.

    Funny, i just thought of my chain. it is 114 links i think, and i know at least 37 of the links are
    master links (useful for a quick chain fix). at least now i have a chain-tool (came on my nifty
    Topeak Hummer) so no more ripping a busted outer plate link off with a leatherman.

    Given that the rear freewheel cluster and front chainrings are fairly new (aka, show little signs of
    wear, other than some rock bash marks on the big ring), it would be a good time to install a new
    chain before it is too late and i need a new drivetrain.

    Found an ad for a computer tech job at some school district. paper gives, like, no information about
    it so i though i would stop in and check it out. may be worth a shot. maybe if i lightly pad my
    resume a bit. needs updating anyway.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  16. Forget converting to a SS.

    Yes you need huge power to get up the climbs but...

    to keep up with geared riders you need to be able to spin like a hamster on speed.

    I find it much harder to keep up with geared riders on the flat on my SS not uphill or even downhil
    (off-road).

    If the geared riders are in their granny rings and you have given up on riding up a hill you can
    push up as fast as they are riding anyway.

    Justin

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Jon Bond <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > >
    > > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Stephen Baker <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > > > > bugboy t-p'ed:
    > > > >
    > > > > >Around here we loose the third ring for a ring that protects the
    2nd
    > > one and
    > > > > >you get a bit more clearance.
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Down here I just use the (steel) big ring as a bash ring. Didn't
    use
    > > the thing
    > > > > much anyway....
    > > > >
    > > > > Steve
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Am i the only person to use the big ring much on the trails?
    > > > --
    > > > ~Travis
    > > >
    > > > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
    > >
    > > The rest of us just like our knees.
    > >
    > > I use it on fireroads, or when racing. However, I'm definitely in the Hampster Wheel camp...
    > > spin spin spin spin spin spin!
    > >
    > > Jon Bond
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Yeah, see, that's the difference. my legs are built for power, whereas your (and most others) are
    > built for speed. I doubt no matter how hard i try i could get a "normal" speed cadence anymore. I
    > just end up spinning out and my feet slip off the pedals. though i did file some nice teeth into
    > the pedals so my feet don't slip when they are wet. i imagine they could be hell should skin come
    > in contact with them in a crash, but i don't crash very often, and when i do, the bike and me seem
    > to part ways rather quickly. i'm not one of those folks that hold on a death grip and ride it into
    > the ground. i learned back when i had a dirt bike that it is safer to separate from the bike to
    > minimize damage from entanglement.
    >
    > hmm, went off on a tangent again... (can you tell i have A.D.D.?)
    >
    > But back on subject, my knees don't bother, except for when i spin too fast. maybe i am just
    > destined to be a power rider that's able to explode in a feat of power that could snap a chain
    > with minimal effort and muscle up a climb... for a few minutes anyway, then i'm dead. maybe i am
    > just simply destined for the singlespeed crowd.
    >
    > Funny, i just thought of my chain. it is 114 links i think, and i know at least 37 of the links
    > are master links (useful for a quick chain fix). at least now i have a chain-tool (came on my
    > nifty Topeak Hummer) so no more ripping a busted outer plate link off with a leatherman.
    >
    > Given that the rear freewheel cluster and front chainrings are fairly new (aka, show little signs
    > of wear, other than some rock bash marks on the big ring), it would be a good time to install a
    > new chain before it is too late and i need a new drivetrain.
    >
    > Found an ad for a computer tech job at some school district. paper gives, like, no information
    > about it so i though i would stop in and check it out. may be worth a shot. maybe if i lightly pad
    > my resume a bit. needs updating anyway.
    > --
    > ~Travis
    >
    > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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