Basmati Rice - spicin' it up

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dee Randall, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    I'm putting 2 cups basmati in a rice cooker today, which is the way I make
    it more often than not. (I soak it 30 minutes first.) Today I'm putting in
    some saffron. I won't use any other spice in it today, but it got me to
    wondering if there is anything else that anyone has tried that I might add.
    I have added one of these at one time or another, in combination, or only
    one ingredient, cardamon pods, cardamon poweder, coriander seeds or
    coriander powder, fresh coriander when finished, tumeric, garam masala, but
    I've never had the right amount or combination for 2 cups of basmati. I
    don't care for chicken stock in basmati. There isn't an Indian spice I've
    tried that I don't like.
    Any suggestions?
    Thanks.
    Dee
     
    Tags:


  2. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:

    > I'm putting 2 cups basmati in a rice cooker today, which is the way I
    > make it more often than not. (I soak it 30 minutes first.) Today
    > I'm putting in some saffron. I won't use any other spice in it
    > today, but it got me to wondering if there is anything else that
    > anyone has tried that I might add. I have added one of these at one
    > time or another, in combination, or only one ingredient, cardamon
    > pods, cardamon poweder, coriander seeds or coriander powder, fresh
    > coriander when finished, tumeric, garam masala, but I've never had
    > the right amount or combination for 2 cups of basmati. I don't care
    > for chicken stock in basmati. There isn't an Indian spice I've tried
    > that I don't like. Any suggestions? Thanks. Dee
    >



    You didn't mention anything about salt. Hopefully, a little salt is
    just assumed.

    Crumble in some dried dundicut peppers, seeds and all.

    A cinnamon stick might be interesting, but I've never tried it.

    Bob
     
  3. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    >> I'm putting 2 cups basmati in a rice cooker today, which is the way I
    >> make it more often than not. (I soak it 30 minutes first.) Today
    >> I'm putting in some saffron. I won't use any other spice in it
    >> today, but it got me to wondering if there is anything else that
    >> anyone has tried that I might add. I have added one of these at one
    >> time or another, in combination, or only one ingredient, cardamon
    >> pods, cardamon poweder, coriander seeds or coriander powder, fresh
    >> coriander when finished, tumeric, garam masala, but I've never had
    >> the right amount or combination for 2 cups of basmati. I don't care
    >> for chicken stock in basmati. There isn't an Indian spice I've tried
    >> that I don't like. Any suggestions? Thanks. Dee
    >>

    >
    >
    > You didn't mention anything about salt. Hopefully, a little salt is just
    > assumed.
    >
    > Crumble in some dried dundicut peppers, seeds and all.
    >
    > A cinnamon stick might be interesting, but I've never tried it.
    >
    > Bob

    Thanks, Bob. I used to not use salt when cooking rice, but now I do and
    it's MUCH better. I'd never thought of dried dundicut peppers -- that, I
    will do.

    Dee
     
  4. Heidi

    Heidi Guest

    I've thrown cumin seeds in when cooking basmati rice.

    The other day at a local Indian restaurant I had lemon rice which was
    basmati with lemon juice, various nuts/seeds, cilantro (fresh
    coriander) and other veggies. I'll have to pay closer attention next
    time I'm there to what was in it. It was a nice change.

    Heidi
     
  5. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Heidi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've thrown cumin seeds in when cooking basmati rice.
    >
    > The other day at a local Indian restaurant I had lemon rice which was
    > basmati with lemon juice, various nuts/seeds, cilantro (fresh
    > coriander) and other veggies. I'll have to pay closer attention next
    > time I'm there to what was in it. It was a nice change.
    >
    > Heidi
    >


    Some coconut milk and/or shredded unsweetened coconut can be nice.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  6. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > I'm putting 2 cups basmati in a rice cooker today, which is the way I

    make
    > it more often than not. (I soak it 30 minutes first.) Today I'm

    putting in
    > some saffron. I won't use any other spice in it today, but it got me

    to
    > wondering if there is anything else that anyone has tried that I

    might add.
    > I have added one of these at one time or another, in combination, or

    only
    > one ingredient, cardamon pods, cardamon poweder, coriander seeds or
    > coriander powder, fresh coriander when finished, tumeric, garam

    masala, but
    > I've never had the right amount or combination for 2 cups of basmati.

    I
    > don't care for chicken stock in basmati. There isn't an Indian spice

    I've
    > tried that I don't like.
    > Any suggestions?
    > Thanks.
    > Dee


    If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very well...
    only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption as packaged.

    Sheldon
     
  7. Anita Amaro

    Anita Amaro Guest

    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Heidi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > I've thrown cumin seeds in when cooking basmati rice.
    > >
    > > The other day at a local Indian restaurant I had lemon rice which was
    > > basmati with lemon juice, various nuts/seeds, cilantro (fresh
    > > coriander) and other veggies. I'll have to pay closer attention next
    > > time I'm there to what was in it. It was a nice change.
    > >
    > > Heidi
    > >

    >
    > Some coconut milk and/or shredded unsweetened coconut can be nice.


    Add a bit of turmeric and some lemon grass to the above and it takes on a
    bit of a Thai feeling.

    A.
     
  8. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> I'm putting 2 cups basmati in a rice cooker today, which is the way I

    > make
    >> it more often than not. (I soak it 30 minutes first.) Today I'm

    > putting in
    >> some saffron. I won't use any other spice in it today, but it got me

    > to
    >> wondering if there is anything else that anyone has tried that I

    > might add.
    >> I have added one of these at one time or another, in combination, or

    > only
    >> one ingredient, cardamon pods, cardamon poweder, coriander seeds or
    >> coriander powder, fresh coriander when finished, tumeric, garam

    > masala, but
    >> I've never had the right amount or combination for 2 cups of basmati.

    > I
    >> don't care for chicken stock in basmati. There isn't an Indian spice

    > I've
    >> tried that I don't like.
    >> Any suggestions?
    >> Thanks.
    >> Dee

    >
    > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very well...
    > only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption as packaged.
    >
    > Sheldon


    Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel pictures of
    the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal where people sit for
    hours picking lice off the top of each other's heads. Yuk! Look what you've
    done now!
    However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5 washings?
    On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them after rinsing off, and
    let them sit on the counter for a while.
    Dee
    >
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Anita Amaro wrote:
    >
    > Add a bit of turmeric and some lemon grass to the above and it takes

    on a
    > bit of a Thai feeling.


    Hmm, a Thai feeling... I know how a Thai feels... you got any
    ingredients makes rice take on the mouth feel of Titty? hehe

    Sheldon
     
  10. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > "Sheldon" <PENMART0[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very

    well...
    > > only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption as

    packaged.
    >
    > Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel

    pictures of
    > the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal where people sit

    for
    > hours picking lice off the top of each other's heads. Yuk! Look what

    you've
    > done now!
    > However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5 washings?
    > On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them after rinsing off,

    and
    > let them sit on the counter for a while.


    Lice nothing... did you ever notice how there are no toilets within a
    hundred miles of those rice paddys... the rice paddy IS the toilet...
    not just for the water buffalo, all that human waste too.

    I wash Basmati until the water runs clear, I use a fine mesh sieve set
    into a pot. Then I soak it about a half hour. Drain, rinse, and cook.
    Soaked you only need one cup water to each cup dry rice. I find
    Basmati cooks up better if soaked. There are at least a zillion
    ingredients you can add to Basmati, or any rice for that matter.

    Sheldon
     
  11. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >
    >> > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very

    > well...
    >> > only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption as

    > packaged.
    >>
    >> Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel

    > pictures of
    >> the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal where people sit

    > for
    >> hours picking lice off the top of each other's heads. Yuk! Look what

    > you've
    >> done now!
    >> However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5 washings?
    >> On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them after rinsing off,

    > and
    >> let them sit on the counter for a while.

    >
    > Lice nothing... did you ever notice how there are no toilets within a
    > hundred miles of those rice paddys... the rice paddy IS the toilet...
    > not just for the water buffalo, all that human waste too.
    >
    > I wash Basmati until the water runs clear, I use a fine mesh sieve set
    > into a pot. Then I soak it about a half hour. Drain, rinse, and cook.
    > Soaked you only need one cup water to each cup dry rice. I find
    > Basmati cooks up better if soaked. There are at least a zillion
    > ingredients you can add to Basmati, or any rice for that matter.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >

    Finally!! A person who only uses one cup water to each cup dry rice!! I
    thought I am the only person in the universe that uses 1-1.

    One winter we camped at Cocoapah Bend, Yuma, Arizona, next to the lettuce
    fields. We would occasionally see the planes spraying the fields; but for
    some reason early in the morning a few dogs would run up and down the rows
    of lettuce, one set of the dog's legs on each side of the lettuce head,
    dragging their 'bottoms' all the complete row. It was the silliest sight
    and still stays in my mind when I'm shopping for lettuce.
    Dee
     
  12. On Fri 08 Apr 2005 11:18:21a, Sheldon wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >
    >> > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very well...
    >> > only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption as
    >> > packaged.

    >>
    >> Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel
    >> pictures of the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal where
    >> people sit for hours picking lice off the top of each other's heads.
    >> Yuk! Look what you've done now!
    >> However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5 washings?
    >> On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them after rinsing off,
    >> and let them sit on the counter for a while.

    >
    > Lice nothing... did you ever notice how there are no toilets within a
    > hundred miles of those rice paddys... the rice paddy IS the toilet...
    > not just for the water buffalo, all that human waste too.
    >
    > I wash Basmati until the water runs clear, I use a fine mesh sieve set
    > into a pot. Then I soak it about a half hour. Drain, rinse, and cook.
    > Soaked you only need one cup water to each cup dry rice. I find
    > Basmati cooks up better if soaked. There are at least a zillion
    > ingredients you can add to Basmati, or any rice for that matter.
    >
    > Sheldon


    Sheldon,

    Does the soak first, then cook in an equal amount of water also apply to
    most other white rices?

    Thanks...

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  13. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    >
    > Sheldon,
    >
    > Does the soak first, then cook in an equal amount of water also apply to
    > most other white rices?
    >
    > Thanks...
    >



    I've done that with brown rice. It cooks a lot faster that way.

    Bob
     
  14. On Fri 08 Apr 2005 12:20:49p, zxcvbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Sheldon,
    >>
    >> Does the soak first, then cook in an equal amount of water also apply to
    >> most other white rices?
    >>
    >> Thanks...
    >>

    >
    >
    > I've done that with brown rice. It cooks a lot faster that way.
    >
    > Bob
    >


    Thanks, Bob. Good to know about the brown rice, one of my favorites.

    I've only ever tried soaking wild rice before cooking. It cooks faster,
    but the added benefit with wild rice is the grain not "exploding" before it
    gets tender.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  15. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri 08 Apr 2005 11:18:21a, Sheldon wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >>
    >> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> >
    >>> > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very well...
    >>> > only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption as
    >>> > packaged.
    >>>
    >>> Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel
    >>> pictures of the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal where
    >>> people sit for hours picking lice off the top of each other's heads.
    >>> Yuk! Look what you've done now!
    >>> However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5 washings?
    >>> On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them after rinsing off,
    >>> and let them sit on the counter for a while.

    >>
    >> Lice nothing... did you ever notice how there are no toilets within a
    >> hundred miles of those rice paddys... the rice paddy IS the toilet...
    >> not just for the water buffalo, all that human waste too.
    >>
    >> I wash Basmati until the water runs clear, I use a fine mesh sieve set
    >> into a pot. Then I soak it about a half hour. Drain, rinse, and cook.
    >> Soaked you only need one cup water to each cup dry rice. I find
    >> Basmati cooks up better if soaked. There are at least a zillion
    >> ingredients you can add to Basmati, or any rice for that matter.
    >>
    >> Sheldon

    >
    > Sheldon,
    >
    > Does the soak first, then cook in an equal amount of water also apply to
    > most other white rices?
    >
    > Thanks...


    > Wayne Boatwright


    Wayne, I don't soak my Japanese rice. For me, it makes it too mushy. And
    it's mushy enough without soaking. However, other's might.

    I almost always go 1-1; sometimes 1-1/4 cup water to 1 cup rice; depending
    on the rice; for instance, I would go 1-1/4 with Tex-Mex without soaking,
    and perhaps 1-1 WITH soaking.
    I usually use a rice cooker, although I am capable of cooking rice on the
    stove.
    Today I put the rice cooker outside to 'cook.' Seems like a reasonable thing
    to do.
    Dee
     
  16. On Fri 08 Apr 2005 04:12:40p, Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote in
    rec.food.cooking:

    > Dee Randall wrote on 08 Apr 2005 in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >>
    >> "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > On Fri 08 Apr 2005 11:18:21a, Sheldon wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> Dee Randall wrote:
    >> >>> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >>> >
    >> >>> > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very
    >> >>> > well... only rice harvested in the US is fit for human
    >> >>> > consumption as packaged.
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel
    >> >>> pictures of the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal
    >> >>> where people sit for hours picking lice off the top of each
    >> >>> other's heads. Yuk! Look what you've done now!
    >> >>> However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5
    >> >>> washings? On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them
    >> >>> after rinsing off, and let them sit on the counter for a while.
    >> >>
    >> >> Lice nothing... did you ever notice how there are no toilets
    >> >> within a hundred miles of those rice paddys... the rice paddy
    >> >> IS the toilet... not just for the water buffalo, all that human
    >> >> waste too.
    >> >>
    >> >> I wash Basmati until the water runs clear, I use a fine mesh
    >> >> sieve set into a pot. Then I soak it about a half hour.
    >> >> Drain, rinse, and cook.
    >> >> Soaked you only need one cup water to each cup dry rice. I find
    >> >> Basmati cooks up better if soaked. There are at least a
    >> >> zillion ingredients you can add to Basmati, or any rice for
    >> >> that matter.
    >> >>
    >> >> Sheldon
    >> >
    >> > Sheldon,
    >> >
    >> > Does the soak first, then cook in an equal amount of water also
    >> > apply to most other white rices?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks...

    >>
    >> > Wayne Boatwright

    >>
    >> Wayne, I don't soak my Japanese rice. For me, it makes it too
    >> mushy. And it's mushy enough without soaking. However, other's might.
    >>
    >> I almost always go 1-1; sometimes 1-1/4 cup water to 1 cup rice;
    >> depending
    >> on the rice; for instance, I would go 1-1/4 with Tex-Mex without
    >> soaking, and perhaps 1-1 WITH soaking.
    >> I usually use a rice cooker, although I am capable of cooking rice
    >> on the stove.
    >> Today I put the rice cooker outside to 'cook.' Seems like a
    >> reasonable thing to do.
    >> Dee
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Before I was diagnosed type 2 diabetic, I would cook a cup of Basmati
    > rice in the rice cooker. I would use a can of cream of chicken soup and
    > enough water/chicken stock to make 2 cups liquid. I also would chuck in
    > some chunked chicken thighs and a bit of mushrooms, onions and/or
    > whatever other veggies I had on hand and felt like using. After the
    > rice cooker turned to warm; I'd also chuck in a handfull of frozen peas
    > then stir and serve. I am a working stiff and I am hungry when I get
    > home...I don't/can't wait the additional soaking time required to go
    > the other way. This was a good, fairly cheap, fast 1 pot meal and
    > depending of what I added to the rice... enough leftovers for lunch the
    > next day.
    >


    I've made virtually the same concoction many times with the same ratios,
    but I've always cooked it in the oven. Very tasty. With two of us eating
    it, there were never any leftovers. <g>

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  17. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri 08 Apr 2005 02:52:48p, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >>
    >> "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> On Fri 08 Apr 2005 11:18:21a, Sheldon wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>>>> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>> >
    >>>>> > If it's real Basmati (imported) just be sure to wash it very
    >>>>> > well... only rice harvested in the US is fit for human consumption
    >>>>> > as packaged.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Sheldon, yes, I do wash my rice pretty well. I've seen travel
    >>>>> pictures of the rice piled in the road, and I've been to Nepal where
    >>>>> people sit for hours picking lice off the top of each other's heads.
    >>>>> Yuk! Look what you've done now!
    >>>>> However, do you have any suggestions other than just 4-5 washings?
    >>>>> On all my veggies, I usually spray vinegar on them after rinsing off,
    >>>>> and let them sit on the counter for a while.
    >>>>
    >>>> Lice nothing... did you ever notice how there are no toilets within a
    >>>> hundred miles of those rice paddys... the rice paddy IS the toilet...
    >>>> not just for the water buffalo, all that human waste too.
    >>>>
    >>>> I wash Basmati until the water runs clear, I use a fine mesh sieve set
    >>>> into a pot. Then I soak it about a half hour. Drain, rinse, and
    >>>> cook.
    >>>> Soaked you only need one cup water to each cup dry rice. I find
    >>>> Basmati cooks up better if soaked. There are at least a zillion
    >>>> ingredients you can add to Basmati, or any rice for that matter.
    >>>>
    >>>> Sheldon
    >>>
    >>> Sheldon,
    >>>
    >>> Does the soak first, then cook in an equal amount of water also apply
    >>> to most other white rices?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks...

    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright

    >>
    >> Wayne, I don't soak my Japanese rice. For me, it makes it too mushy.
    >> And it's mushy enough without soaking. However, other's might.

    >
    > Thanks, Dee. Well, I don't ever buy Japanese rice. I actually find it
    > too
    > "delicate" for my taste.
    >
    >> I almost always go 1-1; sometimes 1-1/4 cup water to 1 cup rice;
    >> depending
    >> on the rice; for instance, I would go 1-1/4 with Tex-Mex without
    >> soaking, and perhaps 1-1 WITH soaking.
    >> I usually use a rice cooker, although I am capable of cooking rice on
    >> the stove.
    >> Today I put the rice cooker outside to 'cook.' Seems like a reasonable
    >> thing to do.
    >> Dee

    >
    > I don't own a rice cooker, probably never will, not because I wouldn't
    > want
    > one, but I cook rice rarely enough that it doesn't warrant the cost or the
    > storage space. I will definitely try some various ratios and try pre-
    > soaking. I've tried plenty of methods using non-soaked rice.
    >
    > Unless I'm planning on using the rice in another dish, I really prefer
    > rice
    > the way one most often gets it in Chinese restaurants, on the dry side and
    > rather "clumpy". I've never really been able to recreate that.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    > ____________________________________________

    Wayne, I like rice this way, too. I'm pretty sure the restaurants use large
    rice cookers to make their rice, not by pot on top of the stove. But I
    think to get this dry, clumpy rice, you could get it only by cooking in a
    rice cooker. Otherwise, you would really have to watch your stove burner to
    make sure it didn't dry out and burn. Also, this dry, clumpy rice comes
    about -- I think -- by it sitting around a while, not being served right
    away. Let us all know if, when you get your dry, clumpy rice -- just try a
    little less water, first. Also, I don't think restaurants use very much
    oil/butter, which inclines soy sauce just to run off instead of soak up.

    By the way, does anyone know why Canadians use mushroom soy sauce -- I'm
    sure not all do, but every Chinese restaurant I've eaten in in Canada has
    used the mushroom soy sauce.

    Dee
     
  18. We usually use Basmati to make Plain / Steamed rice or Polau (aka
    Pilaf). For Plain Rice no seasoning or spice (not even Salt). For Polau
    the "siple" recipe that we follow is:

    * melt some butter or ghee
    * add some ginger (fresh is prefered, but powder can be substituted)
    * add cardamon & cinnamon
    * add the washed & drained rice to the butter and ginger
    * constantly stir the rice to make sure every individual rice grain
    has a chance to be coated with the butter / ghee on mid to mid-hi heat
    * after ~10 minutes, add liquid and salt
    * stir very gently once or twice, but no more
    * wait for a boil
    * immediately turn heat to med to med-low
    * cover for about 25 - 35 min

    The liquid would be approximately 1.5 times the amount of rice. So, for
    2 cups of rice there would be ~3 cups of liquid. The liquid is mostly
    water with very little whole milk. For 3 cups of liquid there would be
    about a quarter of a cup of milk.

    We almost never ever soak the rice in water. In tends to break the
    rice. Many of our friends use the cooker, but we haven't tried it yet.

    - manzoor
     
  19. On Sat 09 Apr 2005 08:43:22a, Manzoorul Hassan wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > We usually use Basmati to make Plain / Steamed rice or Polau (aka
    > Pilaf). For Plain Rice no seasoning or spice (not even Salt). For Polau
    > the "siple" recipe that we follow is:
    >
    > * melt some butter or ghee
    > * add some ginger (fresh is prefered, but powder can be substituted)
    > * add cardamon & cinnamon
    > * add the washed & drained rice to the butter and ginger
    > * constantly stir the rice to make sure every individual rice grain
    > has a chance to be coated with the butter / ghee on mid to mid-hi heat
    > * after ~10 minutes, add liquid and salt
    > * stir very gently once or twice, but no more
    > * wait for a boil
    > * immediately turn heat to med to med-low
    > * cover for about 25 - 35 min
    >
    > The liquid would be approximately 1.5 times the amount of rice. So, for
    > 2 cups of rice there would be ~3 cups of liquid. The liquid is mostly
    > water with very little whole milk. For 3 cups of liquid there would be
    > about a quarter of a cup of milk.
    >
    > We almost never ever soak the rice in water. In tends to break the
    > rice. Many of our friends use the cooker, but we haven't tried it yet.
    >
    > - manzoor


    That sounds delicious!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  20. On Sat 09 Apr 2005 07:29:46a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >> Unless I'm planning on using the rice in another dish, I really prefer
    >> rice the way one most often gets it in Chinese restaurants, on the dry
    >> side and rather "clumpy". I've never really been able to recreate
    >> that.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright *¨*
    >> ____________________________________________

    > Wayne, I like rice this way, too. I'm pretty sure the restaurants use
    > large rice cookers to make their rice, not by pot on top of the stove.
    > But I think to get this dry, clumpy rice, you could get it only by
    > cooking in a rice cooker. Otherwise, you would really have to watch
    > your stove burner to make sure it didn't dry out and burn. Also, this
    > dry, clumpy rice comes about -- I think -- by it sitting around a while,
    > not being served right away. Let us all know if, when you get your dry,
    > clumpy rice -- just try a little less water, first. Also, I don't think
    > restaurants use very much oil/butter, which inclines soy sauce just to
    > run off instead of soak up.
    >
    > By the way, does anyone know why Canadians use mushroom soy sauce -- I'm
    > sure not all do, but every Chinese restaurant I've eaten in in Canada
    > has used the mushroom soy sauce.
    >
    > Dee


    Thanks, Dee. All points well taken, and I wil experiment.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
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