Basso admits signing attempted contract



M

marika

Guest
"Keith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 16:48:40 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2008/apr08/apr25news

>
> I take it liquigas are not a Protour team ?
>


does this liquig stuff made of ass have any thing to do wiht assbags?

mk5000

"They used to get around, walkin' around, lookin' at stuff. They used to
try to find clues to all the mysteries and mistakes God had made. My friend
George said that he was gonna live to be 100 years old. He said - He said
that he was going to be the president of the United States. I wanted to see
him lead a parade and wave a flag on the Fourth of July. He just wanted
greatness. The grown-ups in my town, they were never kids like me and my
friends. They had worked in wars and build machines. It was hard for them to
find their peace. Don't you know how that feels? I like to go to beautiful
places where there's waterfalls and empty fields. Just places that are nice
and calm and quiet." Nasia: George Washington
 
B

Bob Schwartz

Guest
marika wrote:
>
> "Keith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:c0b214d5[email protected]
>> On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 16:48:40 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>> http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=news/2008/apr08/apr25news

>>
>> I take it liquigas are not a Protour team ?
>>

>
> does this liquig stuff made of ass have any thing to do wiht assbags?
>
> mk5000
>
> "They used to get around, walkin' around, lookin' at stuff. They used to
> try to find clues to all the mysteries and mistakes God had made. My
> friend George said that he was gonna live to be 100 years old. He said -
> He said that he was going to be the president of the United States. I
> wanted to see him lead a parade and wave a flag on the Fourth of July.
> He just wanted greatness. The grown-ups in my town, they were never kids
> like me and my friends. They had worked in wars and build machines. It
> was hard for them to find their peace. Don't you know how that feels? I
> like to go to beautiful places where there's waterfalls and empty
> fields. Just places that are nice and calm and quiet." Nasia: George
> Washington
>


Marika, it certainly seems that your posting style is a
little... how shall I say it... deterministic?

Every so often I have a twinge of regret over open
sourcing Kunich.

Bob Schwartz
 
D

Donald Munro

Guest
Bob Schwartz wrote:
> Marika, it certainly seems that your posting style is a little... how
> shall I say it... deterministic?
>
> Every so often I have a twinge of regret over open sourcing Kunich.


But no regrets about unleashing him on an unsuspecting and relatively
innocent UseNet world. I hope you feed your MiniMe better than greg
feeds his primates.
 
B

Bob Schwartz

Guest
Donald Munro wrote:
> Bob Schwartz wrote:
>> Marika, it certainly seems that your posting style is a little... how
>> shall I say it... deterministic?
>>
>> Every so often I have a twinge of regret over open sourcing Kunich.

>
> But no regrets about unleashing him on an unsuspecting and relatively
> innocent UseNet world. I hope you feed your MiniMe better than greg
> feeds his primates.


Upon reflection I don't think Marika has a Kunich base. Marika
seems more like Serdar Argic to me. Argic was written in AWK,
which explains a lot.

http://www.jaedworks.com/shoebox/zumabot.html

Bob Schwartz
 
M

marika

Guest
"Bob Schwartz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Marika, it certainly seems that your posting style is a
> little... how shall I say it... deterministic?


It was in fact an outside wire. They finally came back today and fixed it
Took em 9 years to take it down but they finally did it

>
> Every so often I have a twinge of regret over open
> sourcing Kunich.
>


seee the local section. Saturday. Front page. That pot bust. 180K.
Shirley's neighbor.


mk5000


"Just a note, Linda. The Capital 'P' for the tongue, can be replaced with
alt-0222 (holding the alt key down while doing the numbers on the number
pad) to give you 'Þ'."-- Scott
 
M

marika

Guest
"Donald Munro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
>
> I hope you feed your MiniMe better than greg
> feeds his primates.
>


are his primates related to Eli Manning and or my Aunt Freddie?.



----- Original Message -----
From: "marika" <[email protected]>
Newsgroups: alt.usenet.legends.lester-mosley
Sent: Saturday, April 12, 2008 11:22 PM
Subject: you're coming house


> why did they name gravlax after the California airport
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "marika" <[email protected]>
> Newsgroups: alt.usenet.legends.lester-mosley
> Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 10:30 AM
> Subject: Re: diving of their own
>
>
>> My sister continued
>> I'll be honest, I don't know the real story either. I don't know if she
>> was
>> ASKED to bring something, or DECIDED to bring hot dogs on her own, or
>> what.
>> I really made that part up myself. I was just surmising that they told
>> her
>> to bring lasagna, that was my own interpretation of it based on Ma's
>> version, I could be wrong. The only part we know for sure is she wanted
>> to
>> bring/was going to/ intended to/decided to/ suggested/ offered/ brought/
>> made/ decided on /recommended/ hot dogs, and the girl ' family wanted
>> /were
>> going to/ intended to/decided to/ bought/ made/ suggested/ decided on/
>> recommended lasagna. Nobody knows the "REAL" version, all we know is it
>> was
>> hot dogs vs lasagna, in some fashion. Ahhhh... that classic old tale....
>> hot
>> dogs vs lasagna. How many families have broken up over hot dogs vs
>> lasagna?
>> Hundreds of thousands, no doubt. The Oscar Mayer Feuds, they are called,
>> in
>> the history books.
>>
>> PS she cointinued I am "assigned" a dish at each christmas brunch.
>> Admittedly, I get a choice of things to bring, but it's a short list.
>> Choose
>> one: bagels, hash browns, juice, muffins. But it's a list, nonetheless.
>> They
>> never say "Bring anything at all." I always choose hash browns, cause
>> it's
>> easy. Last year I got annoyed because there is never anything I like at
>> these brunches, and I end up having 6 glasses of water for brunch every
>> year, so I strayed from the list, and brought gravlax (decidely NOT on
>> the
>> list) in addition to the assigned hash browns, and I thought I'd end up
>> taking 5 lbs of gravlax home myself. It was gone within 3 minutes after I
>> walked through the door with it. They all but licked the empty plate
>> clean.
>> Instead, I ended up taking 5 lbs of hash browns home and throwing them in
>> the trash.
>>
>> PS "What an unpalatable mess." Hilarious. Quote of the week.
>>
>> "marika" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:...
>>> last year my aunt got invited to a party but wanted to make hot dog
>>> casserole. it was a graduation party and the kids were from pretty
>>> affluent families. the girl whose party it was wanted lasagna and asked
>>> my aunt not to bring embarrassing hot dogs. so my aunt excused herself
>>> from the party. my sister said yea probably because Too much work.
>>> Though
>>> nowadays you can buy prepared lasagna that's just as
>>> easy to "make" as hotdogs:
>>>
>>> 1) Buy
>>> 2) Open
>>> 3) Heat
>>> 4) Eat
>>>
>>> More importantly, my sister continues WHY would one be offended at being
>>> told precisely what to
>>> bring in the first place? my sister further I get an "assigment" of
>>> what
>>> to bring to every
>>> party I go to. she said I never eat what I bring because I usually hate
>>> it...
>>> but I BRING it, cause that's what the host needs/wants. It's not that
>>> big
>>> a
>>> deal. I'd bring boiled pig's tongue, if that's what they wanted.
>>>
>>> mk5000
>>>
>>> "amazing and totally nerve racking"--ferras
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>

>
 
B

Bret

Guest
On Apr 25, 8:56 pm, Bob Schwartz <[email protected]>
wrote:
> Donald Munro wrote:
> > Bob Schwartz wrote:
> >> Marika, it certainly seems that your posting style is a little... how
> >> shall I say it... deterministic?

>
> >> Every so often I have a twinge of regret over open sourcing Kunich.

>
> > But no regrets about unleashing him on an unsuspecting and relatively
> > innocent UseNet world. I hope you feed your MiniMe better than greg
> > feeds his primates.

>
> Upon reflection I don't think Marika has a Kunich base. Marika
> seems more like Serdar Argic to me. Argic was written in AWK,
> which explains a lot.
>
> http://www.jaedworks.com/shoebox/zumabot.html
>
> Bob Schwartz


I love awk. But I have to do everything in perl for the damn Windoze
users:

http://www.xilinx.com/support/answers/2872.htm

I used to do a lot with csh scripts and awk.

Bret
 
D

Donald Munro

Guest
Bob Schwartz wrote:
> Upon reflection I don't think Marika has a Kunich base. Marika seems more
> like Serdar Argic to me. Argic was written in AWK, which explains a lot.


You sed it.
 
B

Bob Schwartz

Guest
Bret wrote:
> I love awk. But I have to do everything in perl for the damn Windoze
> users:
>
> http://www.xilinx.com/support/answers/2872.htm
>
> I used to do a lot with csh scripts and awk.


After I sent that out it occurred to me that I should
have addressed the subject as Marika.pl.

Bob Schwartz
 
M

marika

Guest
"Bob Schwartz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Upon reflection I don't think Marika has a Kunich base. Marika
> seems more like Serdar Argic to me. Argic was written in AWK,
> which explains a lot.
>
> http://www.jaedworks.com/shoebox/zumabot.html
>



'cept I don't dwell on Turkey, as that's Nato's job.




----- Original Message -----
From: "marika" <[email protected]>
Newsgroups: alt.revrend-jed88,alt.usenet.legends.lester-mosley,alt.rf
Sent: Wednesday, April 09, 2008 9:48 PM
Subject: Re: rhythm world


> Three Faces of Infantilism: NATO's Bucharest Summit
> by Anatol Lieven
>
> http://www.nationalinterest.org/Article.aspx?id=17298
>
> 04.04.2008
>
>
> The Bush administration's push for an immediate offer of a NATO membership
> action plan to Georgia and Ukraine at the NATO summit in Bucharest has
> been blocked, which is good. Not so good is the fact that this was only
> thanks to the opposition of Germany and France; that NATO leaders like the
> organization's Secretary General, Jaap de Hoop Scheffer continue to insist
> that an offer in the fairly near future is inevitable; that since both the
> U.S. parties and all the U.S. presidential candidates favor this course,
> they may well be right; and that in the United States and most of Europe,
> a question of immense importance for the security of the West was not even
> seriously debated in public.
>
> What was also not so good-no, why engage in diplospeak? What was virtually
> criminal in its strategic irresponsibility and intellectual fatuity was
> the fact that this push took place against the background of three
> developments, any one of which should have counseled the greatest caution
> in assuming new and dangerous responsibilities.
>
> The first is obviously NATO's and America's growing difficulties in
> Afghanistan, which provided the other major issue at the summit. And what
> a success the summit was! What a tribute to NATO's commitment to the
> common effort in Afghanistan, and spirit of collective self-sacrifice!
> France came up with 700 new soldiers, which makes approximately one for
> every 400 square miles of Afghan territory or for every 40,000 Afghans.
> The richest group of countries on earth came up with 18 new helicopters
> for Afghanistan; a fraction of the numbers it takes to ferry millionaires
> to their European ski resorts on any given day.
>
> The way things are going, NATO will either have to fight on in Afghanistan
> for a decade and possibly a generation, or the war there will be lost; and
> if it is lost, what credibility will the alliance retain when it comes to
> guaranteeing anyone else's security? And can anyone guarantee on today's
> evidence that the Canadians or Europeans will in fact have the will to go
> on fighting there indefinitely?
>
> Secondly, there was the new crisis in Iraq, and especially in Basra, which
> appears to have been brought to an end in a draw largely thanks to Iranian
> influence. This casts severe doubt on the lasting success of the Bush
> administration's "surge" strategy and rips to shreds whatever was left of
> the ludicrous British claim that we are withdrawing from southern Iraq
> because we have succeeded in stabilizing that area.
>
> However, quite apart from the hostility of British public opinion to the
> entire Iraqi operation, Britain simply had to withdraw most of its troops
> from Iraq if it was to increase its essential troop presence in
> Afghanistan. In Britain as in the United States, there is now nothing left
> for any other new and sustained military deployment. So: a U.S. and
> British force to defend Georgia, anyone? From where exactly? The cast of
> Dad's Army?
>
> Finally, there is the global economic downturn. We do not know how deep
> this will go, and must hope for the best. Some of the predictions from
> sober and reliable experts are however very gloomy indeed; and
> already-impeccably free-market commentators like Martin Wolf of the
> Financial Times are writing that some of the key economic ideas that have
> guided Western policy in the past 20 years will have to be abandoned or
> radically changed.
>
> It is not just that such an economic situation cries out for caution when
> it comes to the assumption of new and possibly very costly
> responsibilities; it is that if God forbid we end up in a really severe
> global recession, many of the political and cultural assumptions that have
> underlain Western policy, and EU and NATO enlargement, may come into
> question, not forever, but for a critical few years. Chief among these is
> that democracy too is on a fixed and inevitable path of expansion.
>
> In circumstances of sharp economic decline, I wouldn't give ten cents for
> the survival of democracy in Georgia or Ukraine. If these countries have
> been made members of NATO, we will all be faced with a horrible
> embarrassment-something that may already be around the corner in Turkey,
> if the military establishment, via the courts, presses ahead with its
> apparent desire to ban and disempower the ruling Islamist party. Indeed,
> if living standards worsen drastically, democracy in parts of Eastern
> Europe, relations with immigrant communities in Western Europe, and the
> attraction of the entire Western democratic model could be called into
> question, at least for a while.
>
> In these circumstances, it is hard to see what conceivable rational
> calculation could support the extension of NATO membership to two new
> countries, one of them (Georgia) involved in unsolved civil war, and the
> other (Ukraine) with a population a large majority of which opposes NATO
> membership. And this is called "spreading democracy"?
>
> Leaving aside domestic political calculations in the United States, what
> this whole process reflects is the profound infantilism of many of the
> Western attitudes concerned. In the United States, the infantile illusion
> of omnipotence, whereby it doesn't matter how many commitments the United
> States has made elsewhere-in the last resort, the United States can always
> do what it likes; in much of Western Europe, the infantile syndrome of
> dependence on the United States, nurtured by a profound desire not to have
> to think and act in an adult fashion concerning the needs and costs of
> European defense; and in Eastern Europe, an infantile obsession with
> historical grudges against Russia.
>
> If this process continues, then we will find ourselves in a situation
> where NATO has made an Article 5 commitment to fight if necessary for a
> Georgian Abkhazia and a Ukrainian Sevastopol. Mr de Hoop Scheffer has been
> urging NATO expansion to these countries, and has
> even-unconscionably-sought to preempt democratic debate within the
> organization of which he is supposed to be the servant by declaring that
> the discussion is over and that Ukraine and Georgia will definitely be
> admitted soon whatever happens. Scheffer is Dutch. Is he suggesting that
> the Dutch army-to give it that name-would fight to defend Ukraine or
> Georgia? Having given the absolutely obvious answer to that question, does
> anything more really need to be said?
>
>
> "marika" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:...
>> Onward the Revolution!
>> By Patrick J. Buchanan
>> Tuesday, April 8, 2008
>>
>> Having cheerfully confessed he knows little about economics, John
>> McCain is advancing himself as a foreign-policy president, a
>> "realistic idealist," he told the World Affairs Council of Los
>> Angeles.
>>
>> But judging from the content of his speech, McCain is no more a
>> realist than he is a reflective man.
>>
>> Speaking of our five-year war in Iraq, McCain declares, "It would
>> be an unconscionable act of betrayal, a stain on our character as a
>> nation, if we were to walk away from the Iraqi people and consign
>> them to the horrendous violence, ethnic cleansing, and possible
>> genocide that would follow a reckless, irresponsible and premature
>> withdrawal."
>>
>> Fair point. There is surely a great risk in a too-rapid withdrawal.
>>
>> But if a U.S. withdrawal, after 4,000 dead and 33,000 wounded, and
>> a trillion dollars sunk, runs the risk of a genocidal calamity,
>> what does that tell us about the wisdom of those who marched us
>> into this war?
>>
>> What threat did Saddam ever pose comparable to the cataclysm McCain
>> says we face if we pull out? Who, Senator, put American on the
>> horns of so horrible a dilemma?
>>
>> "Whether they were in Iraq before is immaterial," McCain warns,
>> "al-Qaida is there now." And that is surely true.
>>
>> But if al-Qaida was not in Iraq before we invaded, why did we
>> invade? And if al-Qaida is there now, what was the magnet that drew
>> them in, if not the U.S. occupation McCain himself championed?
>>
>> Like Condi Rice, who regularly disparages the policies of every
>> president from FDR to Bill Clinton, McCain enjoys parading the
>> higher morality of his devotion to democracy-uber-alles.
>>
>> "For decades in the Middle East we had a strategy of relying upon
>> autocrats to provide order and stability. We relied on the Shah,
>> the autocratic rulers of Egypt, the generals of Pakistan, the Saudi
>> royal family. ... We can no longer delude ourselves that relying on
>> these outdated autocrats is the safest bet."
>>
>> Speaking of self-delusion, does McCain believe the "democrats"
>> lately elected in Pakistan will be tougher on al-Qaida and the
>> Taliban than Pervez Musharraf, who has twice escaped assassination
>> for having sided with us?
>>
>> Does McCain think this new crowd in Islamabad will be more
>> pro-American than the general, when the people who voted them in
>> are among the most anti-American in the Islamic world?
>>
>> From Richard Nixon to George Bush I, we expelled Moscow from Egypt,
>> won the Cold War, brought peace between Egypt and Israel, and
>> created a worldwide alliance, including Hafez al-Assad of Syria,
>> that drove Saddam's army out of Kuwait.
>>
>> What has the Bush-McCain democracy crusade produced, save electoral
>> victories for the Muslim Brotherhood, Hezbollah and Hamas? And if
>> we dump the sultan of Oman, President Mubarak, and the king of
>> Saudi Arabia, who does McCain think will replace them?
>>
>> If undermining Arab autocrats is good for America, why is that also
>> the goal of Osama bin Laden?
>>
>> McCain proposes a "League of Democracies" to unite a hundred
>> nations for peace and freedom. "Revanchist Russia," however, is to
>> be black-balled from McCain's league and thrown out of the G-8.
>>
>> What would this accomplish other than undoing the work of Reagan in
>> bringing Moscow in from the cold, driving Russia into the arms of
>> China, restarting the Cold War and recreating the Beijing-Moscow
>> axis it was Nixon's great achievement to break up?
>>
>> What McCain is proposing is a re-division of the world into the
>> forces of light and the forces of darkness. Moral clarity at last!
>> Has he forgotten the fate of that earlier rabbit warren of the
>> righteous, the League of Nations?
>>
>> Does our "realistic idealist" think a NATO of 25 nations that has
>> mustered a piddling 16,000 soldiers, most of them noncombatants, to
>> stand beside us in Afghanistan is going to confront a nuclear-armed
>> Russia?
>>
>> "Nations have no permanent friends and no permanent enemies. Only
>> permanent interests," said Lord Palmerston.
>>
>> What is critical, especially in wartime, is not whether a regime is
>> autocratic or democratic, but whether it is hostile or friendly.
>>
>> Gen. Washington, at war with democratic Great Britain, is said to
>> have danced a jig when he heard we had Louis XVI as an ally. During
>> our Civil War, Britain built blockade-runners for the Confederacy,
>> while the czar docked his ships in Union harbors. Russia "was our
>> friend/When the world was our foe," wrote Oliver Wendell Holmes.
>>
>> When Nixon launched his airlift to save Israel in the Yom Kippur
>> War, autocratic Portugal let us use the Azores. Democratic France
>> denied Reagan over-flight permission in the 1986 raid on Libya. Two
>> brave U.S. pilots died as a result.
>>
>> When McCain was in the Hanoi Hilton, British and French ships were
>> unloading goods in Haiphong, while Ferdinand Marcos and the South
>> Korean generals sent troops to stand with us and fight beside us.
>>
>> To root one's attitude toward nations based upon their internal
>> politics rather than their foreign policies is ideology. And
>> policies rooted in ideologies, from Trotskyism to democratism, end
>> up on the Great Barrier Reef of reality.
>>
>> SOURCE:
>> http://clicks.aweber.com/y/ct/?l=7wT4Z&m=1Zk3O0SBS1xN9f&b=OOY0k3LCNjAyUG_4ek_2og

>
 
M

marika

Guest
"Bob Schwartz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Bret wrote:
>> I love awk. But I have to do everything in perl for the damn Windoze
>> users:
>>
>> http://www.xilinx.com/support/answers/2872.htm
>>
>> I used to do a lot with csh scripts and awk.

>
> After I sent that out it occurred to me that I should
> have addressed the subject as Marika.pl.
>


I'll do it for you

mk5000

Marge Gunderson: There's the car! There's the car!
Lou: What car?
Marge Gunderson: My car, my car! Tan sierra, tan sierra! --Fargo
 
B

Bob Schwartz

Guest
marika wrote:
>
> "Bob Schwartz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Bret wrote:
>>> I love awk. But I have to do everything in perl for the damn Windoze
>>> users:
>>>
>>> http://www.xilinx.com/support/answers/2872.htm
>>>
>>> I used to do a lot with csh scripts and awk.

>>
>> After I sent that out it occurred to me that I should
>> have addressed the subject as Marika.pl.
>>

>
> I'll do it for you
>
> mk5000
>
> Marge Gunderson: There's the car! There's the car!
> Lou: What car?
> Marge Gunderson: My car, my car! Tan sierra, tan sierra! --Fargo


Could you please ask your author to tweak the localization
to reference all quotes in rbr as being by Benjamin Franklin?

Thanks,

Bob Schwartz
 
On Apr 26, 2:26 am, Donald Munro <[email protected]> wrote:
> Bob Schwartz wrote:
> > Upon reflection I don't think Marika has a Kunich base. Marika seems more
> > like Serdar Argic to me. Argic was written in AWK, which explains a lot.

>
> You sed it.


Nice.
 
M

marika

Guest
"Bob Schwartz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

>
> Could you please ask your author to tweak the localization
> to reference all quotes in rbr as being by Benjamin Franklin?
>



In a post in another thread on one of the bicycles newsgroups, my author
temporarily indulged you by quoting BF, the line about guests and fish

howevr, my author was born in and lived in Philadelphia for most of her life
and went to Penn so she is bored by BF for the most part

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wEDojDWloU
 

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