Bay Area - LA route?

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Steve Juniper, Mar 3, 2004.

  1. Looking for suggestions on bike routes between the Bay Area and the LA area. We are five people
    going for a week at the end of the summer. Want to go by Big Sur, but want to otherwise avoid auto
    traffic. We are old and fussy and will do motels...any suggestions for beautiful routes?

    I'm posting this for a friend so if you reply directly, please do so to:

    [email protected]
    --
    Steve Juniper "Always drink upstream from the herd."
     
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  2. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Steve Juniper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s51...
    > Looking for suggestions on bike routes between the Bay Area and the LA
    area.
    > We are five people going for a week at the end of the summer. Want to go
    by
    > Big Sur, but want to otherwise avoid auto traffic. We are old and fussy
    and
    > will do motels...any suggestions for beautiful routes?
    >
    > I'm posting this for a friend so if you reply directly, please do so to:
    >
    > [email protected]
    > --
    > Steve Juniper "Always drink upstream from the herd."
    >

    You might be interested in the book, Bicycling the Pacific Coast (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089886562X/shastasoftwar-
    20). It describes the coast route in detail.

    I rode from San Francisco to LA a few years ago as part of the '99 AIDS ride. Most of the route was
    inland. Pretty scenery, and probably a bit easier than the coast route. But, if I were to ride it
    again, I think I'd opt for the coast - the coastline is very dramatic. Late in the summer is a good
    time...especially after Labor Day. September/October are best for traffic and weather.

    One route you might consider is Monterey to San Luis Obispo. This will include most of the scenic
    parts, without having to get down into LA proper (which can be a zoo). You can take Amtrak from San
    Luis Obispo back to Monterey, and I'm pretty sure they allow bikes on the train (depending on the
    train, you might not even have to box your bike).

    --
    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.CycliStats.com CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  3. Tanya

    Tanya Guest

    "Steve Juniper" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]i_s51>...
    > Looking for suggestions on bike routes between the Bay Area and the LA area. We are five people
    > going for a week at the end of the summer. Want to go by Big Sur, but want to otherwise avoid auto
    > traffic. We are old and fussy and will do motels...any suggestions for beautiful routes?
    >
    > I'm posting this for a friend so if you reply directly, please do so to:
    >
    > [email protected]

    Here's one good travelogue of a route between SF and LA http://english.glendale.cc.ca.us/sflad1.html

    I've ridden on the Pacific Coast bike route in the Santa Cruz-Watsonville area and its very scenic
    and very little traffic to encounter in that area.
     
  4. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Steve Juniper wrote:

    > Looking for suggestions on bike routes between the Bay Area and the LA area. We are five people
    > going for a week at the end of the summer. Want to go by Big Sur, but want to otherwise avoid auto
    > traffic. We are old and fussy and will do motels...any suggestions for beautiful routes?

    Adventure Cycling has a route that covers the entire Pacific Coast. Your friend would be interested
    in the last two maps of the route:

    http://adventurecycling.org/routes/pacificcoast.cfm

    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  5. Rick Warner

    Rick Warner Guest

    "Steve Juniper" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s51>...
    > Looking for suggestions on bike routes between the Bay Area and the LA area. We are five people
    > going for a week at the end of the summer. Want to go by Big Sur, but want to otherwise avoid auto
    > traffic. We are old and fussy and will do motels...any suggestions for beautiful routes?
    >
    > I'm posting this for a friend so if you reply directly, please do so to:
    >
    > [email protected]

    There are two basic routes, with a number of variants. There is the inland route, and the coastal
    route. The basic coastal route is well documented; look at the Adventure Cycling site on the
    Pacific Coast route, or the Kirkendall and Spring book and the Pacific Coast route, or the Lonely
    Planet guide, or .... lots of info. The major alternative, the inland route, basically differs
    between Monterey Bay area and the Morro Bay/SLO area, where it follows 101 rather than Hwy 1. This
    is the route used by the AIDS ride, Arthritis ride, etc. Since you want to see Big Sur you will
    want to do some variant of the coastal route since this is the part of the ride where the two basic
    routes differ.

    BTW, if you are going 'end of summer', which to me means August, then be prepared for lots of
    traffic, esp. along Big Sur coast. The road is narrow, and the Winnebagos wide. I like it a bit
    later, say mid-October, when weather is still decent but the majority of the motorhomes are parked
    in storage lots (still quite a few).

    First question will be where are you starting from in the Bay Area? That will impact the first part
    of the trip since the first task is to get to the Monterey Bay area. If you are going coastal, you
    want to get to Carmel so you can head down Hwy 1 through Big Sur and on to Morro Bay area. The
    inland routes usually head off somewhere between Watsonville and Salinas to parallel 101. Once you
    choose the basic route, the other areas where there are many choices are Lompoc to Santa Barbara,
    and then Ventura into
    LA. The guide books can give you a start, then you can look at the archives for the alternatives.

    - rick
     
  6. Rick Warner

    Rick Warner Guest

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > You can take Amtrak from San Luis Obispo back to Monterey, and I'm pretty sure they allow bikes
    > on the train (depending on the train, you might not even have to box your bike).

    Between SLO and San Diego, going either direction, there is the Pacific SurfLiner which will take
    roll-on bikes (un-boxed; up to 8/train). If you need to get further north, or start further north,
    you need to take the Coast Starlight (runs LA <-> Seattle) and bikes need to be boxed and checked
    as luggage; boxes need to be < 50 lbs. Train goes to Salinas, not Monterey. Amtrak is a good
    option for return, but does have some limitations. Monterey to SLO is a 3 day ride, max, unless
    you really lolligag.

    - rick
     
  7. Ken Brown

    Ken Brown Guest

    I was in California in January, although by car. Drove north along 1 and back south along 101. 101
    is a 4-lane controlled access highway and I would not think it would be much fun to cycle between
    Monterey area (Salinas) and San Luis Obispo. It should be safe though, with a good shoulder. On
    the other hand, as Rick said, I am not sure I would want to cycle the coast road during the
    tourist season.

    Ken [email protected] (Rick Warner) wrote:

    >There are two basic routes, with a number of variants. There is the inland route, and the coastal
    >route. The basic coastal route is well documented; look at the Adventure Cycling site on the
    >Pacific Coast route, or the Kirkendall and Spring book and the Pacific Coast route, or the Lonely
    >Planet guide, or .... lots of info. The major alternative, the inland route, basically differs
    >between Monterey Bay area and the Morro Bay/SLO area, where it follows 101 rather than Hwy 1. This
    >is the route used by the AIDS ride, Arthritis ride, etc. Since you want to see Big Sur you will
    >want to do some variant of the coastal route since this is the part of the ride where the two basic
    >routes differ.
    >
    >BTW, if you are going 'end of summer', which to me means August, then be prepared for lots of
    >traffic, esp. along Big Sur coast. The road is narrow, and the Winnebagos wide. I like it a bit
    >later, say mid-October, when weather is still decent but the majority of the motorhomes are parked
    >in storage lots (still quite a few).
    >
    >First question will be where are you starting from in the Bay Area? That will impact the first part
    >of the trip since the first task is to get to the Monterey Bay area. If you are going coastal, you
    >want to get to Carmel so you can head down Hwy 1 through Big Sur and on to Morro Bay area. The
    >inland routes usually head off somewhere between Watsonville and Salinas to parallel 101. Once you
    >choose the basic route, the other areas where there are many choices are Lompoc to Santa Barbara,
    >and then Ventura into
    >LA. The guide books can give you a start, then you can look at the archives for the alternatives.
    >
    >- rick

    Ken Brown, Toronto Canada Ontario Rail Trails: http://webhome.idirect.com/~brown delete "nospam" if
    replying via e-mail
     
  8. Rick Warner

    Rick Warner Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 20:17:33 -0500, Ken Brown <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was in California in January, although by car. Drove north along 1 and back south along 101. 101
    >is a 4-lane controlled access highway and I would not think it would be much fun to cycle between
    >Monterey area (Salinas) and San Luis Obispo. It should be safe though, with a good shoulder. On
    >the other hand, as Rick said, I am not sure I would want to cycle the coast road during the
    >tourist season.
    >
    >Ken

    The inland route follows 101 between Salinas and SLO area, not on 101. It is common to start on G17
    (Arroyo Seco) and use G15, G14, G18, G19, etc. down past King City. The real question gets to be
    what to do at King City area and/or at Paso Robles. You can cut over to the coast from just before
    King City, taking Nacimiento-Fergusson Rd. At Paso Robles you can take 46 and/or other cutoffs to
    the coast, or take 41 over from Atascadero. These are all nice ways to avoid the Cuesta Grade into
    SLO which is a pain at best, even with the new lanes. The inland route can avoid 101 entirely, but
    the coast route mandates Hwy 1, at least for large chunks.

    - rick
     
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