BBC - Cyclist Chased & Hit by Police car



P

Phil Clarke

Guest
D.M. Procida wrote:

> I'm not white, middle-class, educated and articulate,
> not a black teenager (or an electrician).


what are you then?
 
D

D.M. Procida

Guest
D.M. Procida <[email protected]> wrote:

> because I'm not white, middle-class, educated and
> articulate, not a black teenager (or an electrician).


er - "...because I'm white..." etc.

Sorry.

Daniele
--
For sale: Apple PowerBook G4 17", 1.67GHz, 1.5GB RAM, 80GB HDD, DVD
writer, Airport Extreme, Bluetooth, backlit keyboard. Almost brand
new - has been used exactly once, on 8th September 2005, for a one-
day project. Absolutely perfect condition. £1500 + VAT or offers.
 
D

David Martin

Guest
MartinM wrote:
> vernon wrote:
> > "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > > Just been watching this bizarre clip on the BBC site where a cyclist

> > appears
> > > to be knocked off, starts running, then gets run over!
> > >
> > >

> > http://news.bbc.co.uk/nolavconsole/ukfs_news/hi/bb_rm_fs.stm?nbram=1&news=1&
> > nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1&nol_storyid=4254616
> > >

> > I think that there's more to the story than has been reported.

>
> do tell


They were chasing the gentleman in question as part of a drugs raid.
The two policemen in the car were in plain clothes and the car was
unmarked. The driver was subsequently convicted of Careless Driving.

As he plead guilty no evidence was shown in court.

...d
 
M

MartinM

Guest
David Martin wrote:
> Adrian Boliston wrote:
> > Just been watching this bizarre clip on the BBC site where a cyclist appears
> > to be knocked off, starts running, then gets run over!
> >
> > http://news.bbc.co.uk/nolavconsole/...s=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1&nol_storyid=4254616

>
> This was the case of a suspect in a drugs operation who was chased by
> two plainclothes policemen in an unmarked car.
>
> The driver plead guilty to careless driving and was convicted.


plain clothes police go OTT and get the wrong man? Shirley not? ;-)
 
MartinM wrote:
> vernon wrote:
> > "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > > Just been watching this bizarre clip on the BBC site where a cyclist

> > appears
> > > to be knocked off, starts running, then gets run over!


> > I think that there's more to the story than has been reported.

>
> do tell


I could but then I'd have to kill you :)

Not all police are gits

Not all 'victims' are innocent.

The tale triggers the 'cover up' alarms that have been sensitised by
the court cases that a close relative of mine has found himself in. In
some instances he's been found not guilty and been able to make claims
against the police because of their 'robust' behaviour as the police
have been unable to present evidence in a non self-incriminating way
but such was their ambitions to 'do him' they took the cases to court
anyway. In other instances the police evidence has been watered down
heavily leading to minimal fines for v.serious offences.

I just have v.strong suspicions that the full story has not been told
and that the 'victim' was not in the wrong place at the wrong time and
had no idea of the I.D. of the two plain clothed officers. The 15 year
olds that I teach have very sensitive plod detection sensors.
Non-plods telling them to do something would be treated to a torrent of
abuse, real plods are fled from.

I don't even think that it's a race issue. Teenagers, the lad was 15 at
the time, have the capacity to be felons irrespective of race, age or
gender. I know 'em, I teach 'em! Situations can be manipulated to mask
the shortcomings of the victim. I often wonder what wondrous tales are
told in court to secure the release of the accused to plague my classes
:)
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, David
Martin ('[email protected]') wrote:

>
> Adrian Boliston wrote:
>> Just been watching this bizarre clip on the BBC site where a cyclist
>> appears to be knocked off, starts running, then gets run over!
>>
>>

http://news.bbc.co.uk/nolavconsole/...s=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1&nol_storyid=4254616
>
> This was the case of a suspect in a drugs operation who was chased by
> two plainclothes policemen in an unmarked car.
>
> The driver plead guilty to careless driving and was convicted.


And frankly, he should not have been charged with that. There was nothing
'careless' about the assault: it was clearly deliberate and with
murderous intent. That the victim survived is remarkable.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; may contain traces of nuts, bolts or washers.
 
M

Morton Burner

Guest
Nick Kew wrote:
>
> Our powers-that-be can be nasty even to middle-class whites, if they
> think you're a bit foreign. It's happened to non-english (though
> 100% white) members of my family. It happened to me when I entered
> England on a ferry from France driving an Italian-registered car.
>
> But at least when the police do Bad Things (which I don't think is
> all that common), they're pretty open about it. Not like the horror
> of bureaucracy, let alone the sheer robbery of an institutionally
> corrupt legal system.


Oops, I always assumed from your name that YOU were a policeman.
--
Morton
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> in message <[email protected]>, David
> Martin ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
> >
> > Adrian Boliston wrote:
> >> Just been watching this bizarre clip on the BBC site where a cyclist
> >> appears to be knocked off, starts running, then gets run over!
> >>
> >>

>

http://news.bbc.co.uk/nolavconsole/...s=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1&nol_storyid=4254616
> >
> > This was the case of a suspect in a drugs operation who was chased by
> > two plainclothes policemen in an unmarked car.
> >
> > The driver plead guilty to careless driving and was convicted.

>
> And frankly, he should not have been charged with that. There was nothing
> 'careless' about the assault: it was clearly deliberate and with
> murderous intent. That the victim survived is remarkable.


Irrespective of whether or not the lad was suspected of or actually guilty
of a serious criminal act had the police been armed it wasn't a situation
(we hope) that would have warranted the firing of a weapon but the car was
used in such a manner to be as deadly as a firearm.
--
Pete
http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/P
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>,
[email protected] ('[email protected]') wrote:

>
> MartinM wrote:
>> vernon wrote:
>> > "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> > news:[email protected]
>> > > Just been watching this bizarre clip on the BBC site where a
>> > > cyclist
>> > appears
>> > > to be knocked off, starts running, then gets run over!

>
>> > I think that there's more to the story than has been reported.

>>
>> do tell

>
> I could but then I'd have to kill you :)
>
> Not all police are gits


Absolutely true. It's quite probable that the police driver in this case
was not, in every day life, a git or a thug. However, just because he
did what he did in an adrenaline charged moment does not excuse it: it
was clearly a deliberate assault with a deadly weapon, and if we are to
have any confidence at all in the police they must be held to at least
the same standards of lawful behaviour as anyone else.

> Not all 'victims' are innocent.


No. But in this case not even the police allege that the victim was
guilty of anything except being black. He was a (probably mouthy) young
black male in the wrong place at the wrong time.

> I don't even think that it's a race issue. Teenagers, the lad was 15 at
> the time, have the capacity to be felons irrespective of race, age or
> gender. I know 'em, I teach 'em! Situations can be manipulated to mask
> the shortcomings of the victim. I often wonder what wondrous tales are
> told in court to secure the release of the accused to plague my classes
> :)


Indeed. The lad clearly had attitude. But - I say again - if the police
could have pinned anything at all on him, they would have. They didn't,
so one has to assume they couldn't. And, sadly, I am not convinced that
the average urban plod is colourblind.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

Due to financial constraints, the light at the end of the tunnel
has been switched off.
 
R

Ric

Guest

>
> The driver plead guilty to careless driving and was convicted.
>

Guess who brings the charges? Er, the police...

Rather convenient that by only charging the driver with careless driving, to
which he can quickly plead guilty and risk only a fine and a few points at
most, that the helicopter footage is kept under wraps thereby saving the
police force as a whole a lot of embarassment....

I wonder what the charge would have been had the drivers been black, and the
cyclist PC Plod on his beat?
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Ric wrote:
>> The driver plead guilty to careless driving and was convicted.
>>

> Guess who brings the charges? Er, the police...
>


ITYM the Crown Prosecution Service.


--
Tony

"I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
Anon
 
B

Badger

Guest
Nick Kew wrote:
> Our powers-that-be can be nasty even to middle-class whites, if they
> think you're a bit foreign. It's happened to non-english (though
> 100% white) members of my family. It happened to me when I entered
> England on a ferry from France driving an Italian-registered car.
>
> But at least when the police do Bad Things (which I don't think is
> all that common), they're pretty open about it.


Sometimes....
 
B

Badger

Guest
Peter B wrote:
>>>This was the case of a suspect in a drugs operation who was chased by
>>>two plainclothes policemen in an unmarked car.

Why wre they not on bikes as well? (Another thread...)
>>>
>>>The driver plead guilty to careless driving and was convicted.

>>
>>And frankly, he should not have been charged with that. There was nothing
>>'careless' about the assault: it was clearly deliberate and with
>>murderous intent. That the victim survived is remarkable.

>
>
> Irrespective of whether or not the lad was suspected of or actually guilty
> of a serious criminal act had the police been armed it wasn't a situation
> (we hope) that would have warranted the firing of a weapon but the car was
> used in such a manner to be as deadly as a firearm.


Not unusual, a number of motorcyclist have been killed or injured down
the years by coppers using vehicles as weapons.
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 23:09:12 +0100 someone who may be Nick Kew
<[email protected]> wrote this:-

>But at least when the police do Bad Things (which I don't think is
>all that common), they're pretty open about it.


I think you'll find that the paperwork with "Not to be shown to the
defence" written on it is rather more than a fiction.

They have not been pretty open about all the Bad Things they did
when some criminals were gathering at Gleneagles earlier this year.


--
David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
David Hansen wrote:
>
> They have not been pretty open about all the Bad Things they did
> when some criminals were gathering at Gleneagles earlier this year.
>


You mean like obstructurating the leader of the freeified world with an
ankle causificating him to fall from his bicycle ;-)


--
Tony

"I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
Anon
 
B

Badger

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:

> David Hansen wrote:
>
>>
>> They have not been pretty open about all the Bad Things they did
>> when some criminals were gathering at Gleneagles earlier this year.
>>

>
> You mean like obstructurating the leader of the freeified world with an
> ankle causificating him to fall from his bicycle ;-)


One of the Hampshire coppers who joined the flying squad (chinhooks) up
there was telling about some of their exploits, not surprised they kept
the assaults on the protestors quiet...