BBC wants stories

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Orienteer, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Orienteer

    Orienteer Guest

    Text of a press release from the CTC:

    The Beeb wants cyclists! January 16 2002

    The BBC is producing a series of programmes on February 12 looking at the state of the transport
    system in the UK.

    Reporters are looking for cyclists from around the country who have interesting stories of their
    experiences of travelling by cycle in rural and urban areas.

    Is cycling in London or other cities a daily nightmare? How can we alleviate congestion? Are things
    getting better or worse? What should the government be doing to meet the 2012 National Cycling
    Strategy targets?

    Please send your stories to [email protected]
     
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  2. Fredster

    Fredster Guest

    "Orienteer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Text of a press release from the CTC:
    >
    > The Beeb wants cyclists! January 16 2002
    >
    > The BBC is producing a series of programmes on February 12 looking at the state of the transport
    > system in the UK.
    >
    > Reporters are looking for cyclists from around the country who have interesting stories of their
    > experiences of travelling by cycle in rural
    and
    > urban areas.

    What exactly do they mean by stories? I never have anything interesting happen to me on my daily
    commute and for that I count myself extremely fortunate and I sincerely hope I have lots more
    uneventful rides in the future. Maybe thay should ask some of the people I see on my rides (no
    lights, wearing black, etc) as I'm sure their journeys are a lot more exciting...
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Orienteer wrote:
    > The Beeb wants cyclists!

    Here's what I sent:

    I have heard a rumour that you are looking for cyclists with an interesting story to tell.

    Sadly, I have to report that my story is entirely mundane: I get up in the morning, I hop on my
    bike, I ride 7 1/2 miles to Henley, I work as an IT consultant, I hop back on my bike and I ride
    home. For the most part the journey passes without incident in both directions.

    I've tried to make it more interesting by buying a recumbent bicycle and riding down hills at
    ludicrous speeds, but ultimately "cyclist rides to work, rides home, gets a bit damp because it
    rained slightly" is hardly likely to make the Nine O'clock News. And I would be quite pleased if it
    remained that way - cyclists who make the news tend not to live to enjoy the attention.

    My whole family has taken up the challenge; during the spring and summer the boys and their Mum ride
    the three and a bit miles to school along a narrow country road infested with man-eating 4x4's, but
    happily the same dull result arises: family rides to school, rides home, no deaths or injuries
    recorded. Thank God.

    OK, I happen to think cycling is pretty special. For a start it's often quicker than when I used to
    drive to Henley. On a good day I pass the same cars in the queue in Reading as I do in the queue in
    Henley. And the time which I used to spend fuming in my car (can I call it a mobile death
    greenhouse, as I do on Usenet? Is that naughty?) is now spent doing healthy exercise. I am a shade
    over 6ft tall and used to weigh over 15 stone; I'm now about 13 stone and nearly 8" smaller in the
    waist. I drink beer, eat pizza, and ride a bike.

    I don't do it to save money, although of course you have to work hard not to. I saved the £2000 cost
    of my new bike in a single year by selling the second car. This year is cash in the bank. I do it
    for fun and for my health - cycling is also my favourite pastime; I have ridden from St Albans to
    Reading in under two hours, and ridden a hundred miles in a day more than once. This is not
    impressive, I'm not a racer, just a relatively fast "trundly tourist." I know people who've done the
    Paris-Brest-Paris and London-Edinburgh audaxes, the longest schedules audax events in Europe, but
    not me - 1,400km is a bit far for a weekend run, if you ask me.

    And you know something? In just short of two years of daily cycling to work and back, I can only
    recall a handful of times when riding has been unenjoyable. And sometimes it's fantastic. The joy of
    riding in a summer thunderstorm stands out as one great moment, reaching 42mph down my favourite
    short bit of hill is another. When was the last time you heard a driver come in and say "wow, that
    was a great drive home!"

    So I wish you good luck finding interesting cyclists, and I fervently hope that you don't make
    cycling out to be some mad, dangerous, soggy, horrible activity. It's a great way to travel, and
    regular cyclists live up to a decade longer than the average so it can't be that dengerous either.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#103 http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#104
     
  4. > Is cycling in London or other cities a daily nightmare? How can we alleviate congestion? Are
    > things getting better or worse? What should the government be doing to meet the 2012 National
    > Cycling Strategy targets?

    Given the result of the 1996 national five year plan to double cycling - cycling in fact went down,
    not up, and got a little bit more dangerous - perhaps the best way to help cycling would be to do
    the opposite of what they did during those five years.

    "When you are in a hole, the first rule is to stop digging."

    Given that the reaction of the gov't's failure to double cycling is for them to announce that they
    will use the same tactics to triple it instead, surely the most important thing to do is to break
    the careers of anyone who has been involved with the project.

    I suppose that it will cost about as much to scrub off all the bike lane paint as it did to put it
    down in the first place, but it will be worth every penny.

    Why should I want to relieve London's congestion? Congestion is the cyclists's friend

    Jeremy Parker
     
  5. "Orienteer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Text of a press release from the CTC:
    >
    > The Beeb wants cyclists! January 16 2002
    >
    > The BBC is producing a series of programmes on February 12 looking at the state of the transport
    > system in the UK.
    >
    > Reporters are looking for cyclists from around the country who have interesting stories of their
    > experiences of travelling by cycle in rural
    and
    > urban areas.
    >
    > Is cycling in London or other cities a daily nightmare?

    No.

    Next question.
     
  6. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "Fredster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Orienteer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Text of a press release from the CTC:
    > >
    > > The Beeb wants cyclists! January 16 2002
    > >
    > > The BBC is producing a series of programmes on February 12 looking at
    the
    > > state of the transport system in the UK.
    > >
    > > Reporters are looking for cyclists from around the country who have interesting stories of their
    > > experiences of travelling by cycle in rural
    > and
    > > urban areas.
    >
    > What exactly do they mean by stories? I never have anything interesting happen to me on my daily
    > commute and for that I count myself extremely fortunate and I sincerely hope I have lots more
    > uneventful rides in the future. Maybe thay should ask some of the people I see on my rides (no
    > lights, wearing black, etc) as I'm sure their journeys are a lot more exciting...
    >
    >

    I went for a cycle the other day, came across a garage sale, bought some books.

    Will that do?
     
  7. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Jeremy Parker <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Congestion is the cyclists's friend
    >

    I hate cycling with a blocked nose ;-)

    Tony

    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place" George
    Bernard Shaw.
     
  8. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Jeremy Parker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Why should I want to relieve London's congestion? Congestion is the cyclists's friend

    Indeed. When colleagues tell me that the roads are chock full of traffic that particular evening, I
    know my commute home is going to be even more rewarding.
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  9. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Jeremy Parker wrote:

    > Given that the reaction of the gov't's failure to double cycling is for them to announce that they
    > will use the same tactics to triple it instead, surely the most important thing to do is to break
    > the careers of anyone who has been involved with the project.

    Closely followed by their legs - making them ride on a shared use path should do the trick :)

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#103 http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#104
     
  10. Jeremy Parker <[email protected]> writes:

    >> Is cycling in London or other cities a daily nightmare? How can we alleviate congestion? Are
    >> things getting better or worse? What should the government be doing to meet the 2012 National
    >> Cycling Strategy targets?

    >Given the result of the 1996 national five year plan to double cycling - cycling in fact went down,
    >not up, and got a little bit more dangerous - perhaps the best way to help cycling would be to do
    >the opposite of what they did during those five years.

    >"When you are in a hole, the first rule is to stop digging."

    >Given that the reaction of the gov't's failure to double cycling is for them to announce that they
    >will use the same tactics to triple it instead, surely the most important thing to do is to break
    >the careers of anyone who has been involved with the project.

    One of the symptoms of insanity is to keep doing what didn't work last time, in the hope that this
    time it will work.
    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 650 3085 School of Artificial Intelligence, Division of
    Informatics Edinburgh University, 5 Forrest Hill, Edinburgh, EH1 2QL, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/daidb/people/homes/cam/ ] DoD #205
     
  11. "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jeremy Parker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > Why should I want to relieve London's congestion? Congestion is the cyclists's friend
    >
    > Indeed. When colleagues tell me that the roads are chock full of traffic that particular evening,
    > I know my commute home is going to be even more rewarding.

    I guess you can sometimes get more slipstreaming effect once traffic slows from 35mph to 20-25mph,
    but any slower than about 15mph and you can actually end up being slowed down a fair bit. Ducking &
    diving between rows of 5mph crawling traffic is certainly not my idea of fun!
     
  12. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    elyob wrote:
    > "Fredster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>"Orienteer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>Text of a press release from the CTC:
    >>>
    >>>The Beeb wants cyclists! January 16 2002
    >>>
    >>>The BBC is producing a series of programmes on February 12 looking at
    >>
    > the
    >
    >>>state of the transport system in the UK.
    >>>
    >>>Reporters are looking for cyclists from around the country who have interesting stories of their
    >>>experiences of travelling by cycle in rural
    >>
    >>and
    >>
    >>>urban areas.
    >>
    >>What exactly do they mean by stories? I never have anything interesting happen to me on my daily
    >>commute and for that I count myself extremely fortunate and I sincerely hope I have lots more
    >>uneventful rides in the future. Maybe thay should ask some of the people I see on my rides (no
    >>lights, wearing black, etc) as I'm sure their journeys are a lot more exciting...
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > I went for a cycle the other day, came across a garage sale, bought some books.
    >
    > Will that do?
    >

    Somehow I think they would much rather hear about a few scare stories rather than the overwhelming
    majority of uneventful trips.

    James
     
  13. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    >
    > I guess you can sometimes get more slipstreaming effect once traffic slows from 35mph to 20-25mph,
    > but any slower than about 15mph and you can
    actually
    > end up being slowed down a fair bit. Ducking & diving between rows of
    5mph
    > crawling traffic is certainly not my idea of fun!

    Yes, but at least you're actually moving and they're not (well barely). Simon.
     
  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 18 Jan 2003 07:49:15 +0900, James Annan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Somehow I think they would much rather hear about a few scare stories rather than the overwhelming
    >majority of uneventful trips.

    I'd bet a fiver on it, except I haven't got a fiver because there was duty and VAT due on my parcel
    from the USA this morning.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  15. Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I'd bet a fiver on it, except I haven't got a fiver because there was duty and VAT due on my parcel
    >from the USA this morning.

    Hah. My fresh Kool Stops arrived untouched... but they are the dual compounds, not the entirely
    salmon as I asked for. Bother.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  16. "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Yes, but at least you're actually moving and they're not (well barely).

    I guess there can sometimes be a sort of smug reward from the suffering of others.
     
  17. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

  18. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

  19. "elyob" <[email protected]> wrote:
    ( Iwent for a cycle the other day, came across a garage sale, bought some ) books.

    It is a little advertised danger of cycling that it tends to increase the number of your books,
    especially second-hand ones. Perhaps bicycle luggage capable of carrying books ought to come with a
    health warning?
     
  20. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    I was cycling to work last week, when I stopped off at the Newsagents. I've always fancied the girl
    who works there. Well on this particular morning,....

    Tim.
     
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