beach riding

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by John Riley, May 7, 2003.

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  1. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many of
    the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?

    Some rental places _forbid_ riding the rental bikes on the sand, so there must be issues, even where
    it is possible. Sand in the chain perhaps?

    This bike is "out of stock", but this old style might deal with some of the mechanical issues with
    sand in the works, since it has very few works.

    http://www.coker.com/Prodviewer.asp?ID=1961

    johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
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  2. "john riley" skrev...
    > Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many
    > of the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?

    I did 11 km in Poland on a sandroad. Took an hour or so. I'd recommend wide tires with low pressure.
    A low gear and not clipping in. Some loose patches required a bit of speed to get through without
    getting stuck. But speed increased the chances of wiping out. This was on a suspended SWB with
    tailbox and fairing and a good deal of luggage.

    Mikael
     
  3. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many
    > of the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?

    At the beach, firm sand is wet sand. Wet sand soon becomes dry and loose. This is not good.
    It is difficult to find a place at the beach that is uniformly hard packed. Wider tires are
    still required.

    > Some rental places _forbid_ riding the rental bikes on the sand, so there must be issues, even
    > where it is possible. Sand in the chain perhaps?

    Dirty chains are certainly one issue. Packed Ocean Beaches are composed of sand and salt water. Sea
    water is most corrosive. This is the major issue with bikes and especially cars driven on the beach
    (in Texas where this is legal and a God given right).
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  4. Whenever I travel to South Carolina, I thoroughly enjoy riding the beaches; however, I've never
    taken my expensive recumbent out there--Instead I rent a "Beach Cruiser" from a local bike shop. Yes
    there are issues: As you mentioned, the sand can do damage to the gears; more importantly, the salt
    and spray in the air immediately begins eating away at whatever metal parts it touches. If you are
    bent on riding there and understand the possible consequences, then I'd offer a few suggestions: 1.)
    Skinny roadie tires, need not apply. 2.) Stay out of the salt water puddles. 3.) Rinse your bike
    thoroughly and immediately after each use.

    Have fun! But I think a $15 rental could save you a lot of trouble.

    Larry

    "john riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many
    > of the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?
    >
    > Some rental places _forbid_ riding the rental bikes on the sand, so there must be issues, even
    > where it is possible. Sand in the chain perhaps?
    >
    > This bike is "out of stock", but this old style might deal with some of the mechanical issues with
    > sand in the works, since it has very few works.
    >
    > http://www.coker.com/Prodviewer.asp?ID=1961
    >
    > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  5. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Cletus Lee <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    > At the beach, firm sand is wet sand. Wet sand soon becomes dry and loose. This is not good. It is
    > difficult to find a place at the beach that is uniformly hard packed. Wider tires are still
    > required.

    I haven't had the pleasure of any TX beaches, but my experience in N. California, Florida, and a bit
    of Georgia is that there is a great deal of variety in the sand conditions. The N. Florida and S.
    Georgia beaches are much firmer than others. I was recently at a beach near St. Augustine, FL and
    another on Jekyll Island, Georgia and both were very firm well away from the surf. There were people
    riding bikes on the beach on Jekyll Island.

    Other points taken about sand, salt, and moisture - just like trying to ride in the winter in
    Toronto; ok, except for the warm sunshine ;-)

    johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  6. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Cletus Lee <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    > > At the beach, firm sand is wet sand. Wet sand soon becomes dry and loose. This is not good. It
    > > is difficult to find a place at the beach that is uniformly hard packed. Wider tires are still
    > > required.
    >
    > I haven't had the pleasure of any TX beaches, but my experience in N. California, Florida, and a
    > bit of Georgia is that there is a great deal of variety in the sand conditions.
    >
    Oh yes, I forgot to mention, the tar balls that wash up on the beach make great bonding material for
    the sand grains,
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  7. Edward Wong

    Edward Wong Guest

    > Some rental places _forbid_ riding the rental bikes on the sand, so there must be issues, even
    > where it is possible. Sand in the chain perhaps?

    This is where those "chainless" or "shaft drive" bikes may have an edge.

    http://www.chainless.com

    Edward Wong Orlando, FL
     
  8. Larry Varney

    Larry Varney Guest

    john riley wrote:
    > Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many
    > of the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?
    >
    > Some rental places _forbid_ riding the rental bikes on the sand, so there must be issues, even
    > where it is possible. Sand in the chain perhaps?
    >
    > This bike is "out of stock", but this old style might deal with some of the mechanical issues with
    > sand in the works, since it has very few works.
    >
    > http://www.coker.com/Prodviewer.asp?ID=1961
    >
    > johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
    >

    I rode my GTO on the beach for about 5 miles or so on this past Bike Florida. And it was fun! But
    I did run into a couple of "soft" spots where I had to get off and walk the trike to firmer sand.

    --
    Larry Varney Cold Spring, KY http://home.fuse.net/larryvarney
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    john riley wrote:
    >
    > Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many
    > of the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?...

    Without additional comment: < http://www.ransbikes.com/Gallery/Archive/Hattar.htm >

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  10. Dalev

    Dalev Guest

    [email protected] (john riley) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Every time I find myself on a beach with firm sand, I wonder about cycling on it. Seems like many
    > of the beaches in N. Florida or S. Georgia would work. Has any one done this? How did it go?
    >
    > snippp johnriley1 (at) rogers.com

    Years ago, when a Schwinn MTB with city tires was my bike of choice, I pedalled the 7 or 10 miles
    from parking lot to False Cape State Park. False Cape is the southernmost piece of Virginia, and is
    walk/canoe/bike in only, protected by Back Bay Wildlife Refuge. Going in, I used the inland
    dirt/sand roads- dry and soft, but passable. Going out I, like you, wondered about riding up the
    beach. So I did
    it.

    The wettest sand is the hardest sand, so I rode just at the water's edge. Then the surf washed thru
    my spokes. Since I was already sand/salted, I rode in a few inches of ocean water for a while. Works
    fine. Then the shore dipped a little and more surf hit my hubs. So I rode deeper. I rode a good mile
    with my tires completely submerged- in about 2 feet of water- pushed around but never knocked over
    by the gentle surf. I could see blue crabs slide away on the sand below.

    By the time I got back to the parking lot, monsoon rains had hit. The lot was empty except for a 10
    year old local boy with a BMX bike. We plowed enthusiastically!! thru hub deep rain water in the
    parking lot. I hoped to flush the sand and salt, but no luck. When I got home I had to completely
    disassemble the bike- every bearing, every cable- to clean and oil.

    Worth it? You bet. Do I recommend you try it? Not with your best bent. Not even with the $15
    rental... But if you still have that Walmart special in the garage- go for it.
     
  11. Mikeatlbch

    Mikeatlbch Guest

    I have ridden on the beach in northeast florida for 20 years. We even had a 5 mile time trial here
    about 15 years ago (never repeated as organizers thought 10- 15 mph speeds and what they witnessed
    scared them. About 150 participants winner averaged 32mph, wind aided on a time trial bike. Remember
    auto racing in florida began on the beach.

    I commute daily and depending on the tides will often do 3 miles of my commute on the beach.

    Larry Varney was ridding in the norther portion of a 30 mile stretch of beach from Mayport
    Naval Station/Hanna Park at the Saint John' River to Saint Augustine Inlet. I have only done
    the full metric sand century once...low tide is the time to ride so have to complete the ride
    in about 4 hours.

    Currently use trek R200 and Catrike Speed Comp pools on trek and rear of trike and City Jet 16x1.95
    on front. I cannot float over the soft sand above the high tide line as many can on mountain bikes.
    Always rinse bike after use and lube chain freqently. You buy new chains if you forget to take care
    of them and on bents not an inexpensive event...a good motivator for chain care.

    Mike
     
  12. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    [email protected] (Mikeatlbch) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have ridden on the beach in northeast florida for 20 years. [...] Mike

    Thanks for the post, Mike. I'm saving it. It sounds like you know whereof you speak. Maybe I'll see
    you on the sand next winter.

    John Riley
     
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