Beautiful Bike day in Switzerland Villlage

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Red Cloud, Sep 9, 2004.

  1. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    What a beautiful nation! I'm glad I'm here in small Switzerland
    village.
    I always want to visit this village. This is the Heidi country. I've
    read
    the children novel Heidi and saw many Heidi movie. Heidi was one of my
    children dream, and my dream came true. Heidi was not a fairtale
    story.
    It was real story writen by Hohanna Spyri born in Hirzer. I'm here
    riding
    a bike. The road is so narrow defintely not for the car. There is no
    car
    around here. Reminds me of back in America where every Americans drive
    big fat
    truck. Of course, they hardly ride a bike. Image big fat American
    dumb-ass on a bike wheel. You are not going see big fat folk in
    Switzerland.
    I understand now why this nation has been haunted my memory of
    beautiuful alpine
    muntain and surreal landscape. It was not work of mothernature but
    Swiss has
    worked for it. One thing Swiss don't do is driving a car everyday.
    Swiss is
    rich folk they can drive a hugh car bigger than American fat-ass
    truck but
    they don't because they are worrying about pollution as other Euro
    folks do.
    The village landscape is so green and one thing I couldn't find is
    this
    "no trespassing" sign. You go everyhwere in American village you will
    see
    no tresspassing sign. Americans claimed they own all the land after
    killing
    the 95% of Native Indians. You violate this sign you end up in jail.
    I did not think the nature was not that free in america. Here in
    Switerland
    it's all open and the air is so clean. It was the care and love of
    swiss for the
    mothernature. Swiss deserves this land, and I honor them. I wish I
    could live
    here for the rest of my life and never come back to the prison
    lifestyle of America.
     
    Tags:


  2. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    Little Meow wrote:

    > Red Cloud wrote:
    >
    >
    >>What a beautiful nation! I'm glad I'm here in small Switzerland
    >>village.
    >> I always want to visit this village. This is the Heidi country. I've
    >>read

    >
    > <snip delusion>
    >
    >
    > You're still in Los Angeles.


    I don't drink alchohol, but I'd do so if I could find what this guy's on.

    --
    paul DOT cassel aT
    gMail dot COM
     
  3. Red Cloud wrote:
    > What a beautiful nation! I'm glad I'm here in small Switzerland
    > village.
    > (snip)
    > One thing Swiss don't do is driving a car everyday.


    Well, dear Cloud, every morning I happen to wake up in Switzerland, get
    my bike and ride to work, and what I see around me is a long flow of
    cars and scooters with an occasional lone cyclist like myself... and I
    haven't met Heidi (yet). So much for your romanticism.

    > (snip)
    > ...one thing I couldn't find is
    > this
    > "no trespassing" sign.


    Well, this one, without being really accurate, is more realistic. There
    is here a lot of public land, or of private land with public right of
    way, which makes it very easy to just walk through. I am not talking
    about my neighbour's lawn, which is as closed to trespassing as
    anywhere, but rather about woods, pastures, or just paths through fields
    and vineyards.

    Jacques
     
  4. Jacques Moser wrote:

    > Well, dear Cloud, every morning I happen to wake up in Switzerland, get
    > my bike and ride to work, and what I see around me is a long flow of
    > cars and scooters with an occasional lone cyclist like myself... and I
    > haven't met Heidi (yet). So much for your romanticism.


    I was much impressed on my visit to Geneva in June, by the beauty and
    frequency of the bikes. I do think that you can tell a great deal about a
    civil society by observing the state, use and quality of its bicycles.

    Cambridge UK: bratty kids trying to one-up eachother with shiny tumescent
    MTBs despite the pancake-flat terrain.
    London: a huge range of bike-styles, but disguised with grungy tape and
    chipping paintwork to look old and ugly even when they're not.
    Paris and banlieues: boy-bikes hugely predominant, often cheap, labelled
    Go-Sport or Decathlon. A few old and creaky city-bikes ridden by ex-hippie
    ecolos trying to score a point against globalisation, but almost no finer
    bikes of the kinds that attract me.
    But Geneva: ravishing, expensive bikes everywhere, left out in the street
    with nary a lock, with sober hub-shifting city-types and lady-types
    predominating. Broad comfortable seats, gleaming paintwork, beautiful jewel
    colors. The "commercial" bikes you could borrow for free were of a far
    higher quality than the rentals in Cambridge.

    Some sights I have only seen there: a dignified, grizzled, helmeted banker
    type in an elegant suit, riding a fine bike to work. Three boys riding
    abreast in the night down the Grand' Rue - two on bikes, the third on a
    skateboard, all with linked arms, in perfect synchrony and surreally silent.
    A youth riding a bike and leading, beside him, another, riderless bike with
    his hand on the seat - talk about balancing with your hands off the bars! I
    also remarked the wide practise of mounting a basket on the back-rack rather
    than the handlebars. Makes sense if you have to climb, not to have that
    added instability up front, I suppose.

    All in all, those bikes spoke of a very wealthy and orderly society, where
    neighborhoods were safe and citizens were health-conscious and civic.
    Without losing myself in romantic utopianism I must say it is a
    _very_different construction of social status than what I saw when visiting
    my parents in Southern California.


    EFR
    Ile de France
     
  5. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    Elisa Francesca Roselli <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Jacques Moser wrote:
    >

    where
    > neighborhoods were safe and citizens were health-conscious and civic.
    > Without losing myself in romantic utopianism I must say it is a
    > _very_different construction of social status than what I saw when visiting
    > my parents in Southern California.
    >
    >


    There is no civility here in Souther CA. EVeryone looks for greed
    and buck.
    They don't care. The Street is getting wild by NASCAR type of
    drivers.
    This is more than a white guy on wheel. everyone. every race and color
    of skin
    driver faster than before. This is a cultural phenomoman driven by
    advertising
    and mass consumption addicted society where the everyone color of skin
    must join together in the name of nihilist materialism. Now the
    multi-culturalism finallly seemed to achieve here in the name of
    nihilism where
    nobody care of anything except what they want now.










    > EFR
    > Ile de France
     
  6. Muttley

    Muttley Guest

    On 14 Sep 2004 12:58:01 -0700, [email protected] (Red Cloud) wrote:

    > There is no civility here in Souther CA. EVeryone looks for greed
    >and buck.
    >They don't care. The Street is getting wild by NASCAR type of
    >drivers.
    >This is more than a white guy on wheel. everyone. every race and color
    >of skin
    >driver faster than before. This is a cultural phenomoman driven by
    >advertising
    >and mass consumption addicted society where the everyone color of skin
    >must join together in the name of nihilist materialism. Now the
    >multi-culturalism finallly seemed to achieve here in the name of
    >nihilism where
    >nobody care of anything except what they want now.


    wibble
     
  7. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    Jacques Moser <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Red Cloud wrote:
    > > What a beautiful nation! I'm glad I'm here in small Switzerland
    > > village.
    > > (snip)
    > > One thing Swiss don't do is driving a car everyday.

    >
    > Well, dear Cloud, every morning I happen to wake up in Switzerland, get
    > my bike and ride to work, and what I see around me is a long flow of
    > cars and scooters with an occasional lone cyclist like myself... and I
    > haven't met Heidi (yet). So much for your romanticism.


    Dear Jacques,
    You happen to be in big city. No doubt. Geneva??? I'm talking about
    villege. I don't think Heidi folk drive a car.


    >
    > > (snip)
    > > ...one thing I couldn't find is
    > > this
    > > "no trespassing" sign.

    >
    > Well, this one, without being really accurate, is more realistic. There
    > is here a lot of public land, or of private land with public right of
    > way, which makes it very easy to just walk through. I am not talking
    > about my neighbour's lawn, which is as closed to trespassing as
    > anywhere, but rather about woods, pastures, or just paths through fields
    > and vineyards.
    >
    > Jacques



    In America, there is no such free land to walk around. Both private
    and public land, they set the designated path and put no trespassing
    sign.
    That's why you see the bunch military guys patroling the National
    Park.
    These guys are calling as "Park ranger" and is not free to walk
    around.
    YOu will be arrest right away for illeal entry. They call as National
    Park
    but is owned by federal government and is never free to walk around.

    Only land you have free to walk around is a barren or desert land
    where
    nobody want to live there. My friend bought the land where I only
    stayed
    4 hr I couldn't stand the barren land in Southern CA. I was standing
    this
    barren no tree, no wood, no pasture land I thought i was going to
    choke to die.
    All the nice and milky and honey is occupied and stolen by white
    race while driving out Native Indians.
     
  8. Muttley

    Muttley Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 21:40:30 GMT, Little Meow <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Some of these parks charge an entry fee to help
    >with upkeep, not to keep Red Cloud out.


    That's only because they don't know about him!
     
  9. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Elisa Francesca Roselli wrote:
    >
    > Jacques Moser wrote:
    >
    > > Well, dear Cloud, every morning I happen to wake up in Switzerland, get
    > > my bike and ride to work, and what I see around me is a long flow of
    > > cars and scooters with an occasional lone cyclist like myself... and I
    > > haven't met Heidi (yet). So much for your romanticism.

    >
    > I was much impressed on my visit to Geneva in June, by the beauty and
    > frequency of the bikes. I do think that you can tell a great deal about a
    > civil society by observing the state, use and quality of its bicycles.
    >
    > Cambridge UK: bratty kids trying to one-up eachother with shiny tumescent


    Are you sure that 'tumescent' is the word you want here? Check your
    dictionary.

    > MTBs despite the pancake-flat terrain.
    >
    > But Geneva: ravishing, expensive bikes everywhere, left out in the street
    > with nary a lock, with sober hub-shifting city-types and lady-types
    > predominating. Broad comfortable seats, gleaming paintwork, beautiful jewel
    > colors. The "commercial" bikes you could borrow for free were of a far
    > higher quality than the rentals in Cambridge...
    >
    > All in all, those bikes spoke of a very wealthy and orderly society, where
    > neighborhoods were safe and citizens were health-conscious and civic.
    > Without losing myself in romantic utopianism I must say it is a
    > _very_different construction of social status than what I saw when visiting
    > my parents in Southern California.


    Well, for one thing we aren't required to throw our cars away as soon as
    they no longer look showroom-fresh. We actually allow poor people to
    live here, too. Don't bother with New Orleans, you'll probably like the
    Disneyland version better.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    =========================================================
    "Anonymity is a shield from the tyranny of the majority."
    -- U.S. Supreme Court, McIntyre v Ohio Elections,1995
     
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