Bechamel

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dee Randall, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. On Tue 21 Mar 2006 09:55:54a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bob (this
    one)?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Tue 21 Mar 2006 06:28:22a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Peter
    >> Aitken?
    >>
    >>
    >>>"Donald Martinich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>>In article <pgHTf.70585$%[email protected]>,
    >>>>"Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>"Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:[email protected]
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I've never made a bechamel that I would consider exceptional or even
    >>>>>>acceptable (for me). Today I tried a different tactic.
    >>>>
    >>>>snip!
    >>>>
    >>>>>Sounds delicious but PLEASE do not call it Bechamel sauce. Bechamel is
    >>>>>one of those few recipes that has a definite history, rooted in
    >>>>>classical French
    >>>>>cooking, and it does not use cream but rather milk or white stock.
    >>>>>Call it Dee Dee Sauce if you like - but let's preserve the meaning of
    >>>>>traditional recipe names!!
    >>>>
    >>>>I'm all for that, Peter! And in that spirit, I will quote from my 1961
    >>>>English edition of the Larousse Gastronomique: "Originally, the
    >>>>bechamel was made by adding a liberal amount of fresh cream to a thick
    >>>>veloute sauce."
    >>>>
    >>>>D.M.
    >>>
    >>>That's quite interesting because Julia has it different. I guess even
    >>>the "classic" recipes are not set in stone.

    >>
    >> Fettucini Alfredo anyone?

    >
    > That's not really a sauce, you know...


    Did I say "sauce"? <g>

    > I bet that's never come up before.


    LOL!

    > No, seriously.


    "seriously"

    > Pastorio
    >




    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     


  2. Jude

    Jude Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:

    > There are four theories on the origin of Béchamel Sauce:
    > a.. The Italian version of who created this sauce is that it was created
    > in the 14th century and was introduced by the Italian chefs of Catherine de
    > Medici (1519-1589), the Italian-born Queen of France. In 1533, as part ofan
    > Italian-French dynastic alliance, Catherine was married to Henri, Duke of
    > Orleans (the future King Henri II of France. It is because of the Italian
    > cooks and pastry makers who followed her to France that the French came to
    > know the taste of Italian cooking that they introduced to the French court.
    > Antonin Carème(1784-1833), celebrated chef and author, wrote in 1822: "The
    > cooks of the second half of the 1700's came to know the taste of Italian
    > cooking that Catherine de'Medici introduced to the French court."


    And you're gonna make us guess the other 3? Does the winner get a
    prize? <g>
     
  3. Dee Randall wrote:
    > Then I added the finished mushrooms and the spaghetti to the big pan of
    > bechamel and used tongs to separate them as they cooked. This really tasted
    > like carbonara.


    Carbonara?

    Do you mean Alfredo? (and by "mean" I mean in the American colloquial
    sense, because in Italy they kinda don't know what Alfredo is, they
    call pasta in white sauce something like pasta in white sauce...though
    I don't imagine this will actually forestall the flamewar about to
    erupt...)

    --Blair
     
  4. Blair P. Houghton wrote:
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    >>Then I added the finished mushrooms and the spaghetti to the big pan of
    >>bechamel and used tongs to separate them as they cooked. This really tasted
    >>like carbonara.

    >
    > Carbonara?
    >
    > Do you mean Alfredo? (and by "mean" I mean in the American colloquial
    > sense, because in Italy they kinda don't know what Alfredo is, they
    > call pasta in white sauce something like pasta in white sauce...though
    > I don't imagine this will actually forestall the flamewar about to
    > erupt...)
    >
    > --Blair


    Dammit, Blair...

    You have the brains of a yadda, yadda and wouldn't know a yadda, yadda
    and your use of English is worse than an illiterate yadda, yadda...

    Just in case nobody else jumps in. I mean we have a system to uphold.

    No need to thank me.

    Pastorio
     
  5. Kent

    Kent Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Kent, when you say, 2/3 oil to 1 part flour. Do you mean 2/3 cup of oil
    > and 1/3 cup of flour and how much milk for those amounts?
    > Thanks
    > Dee Dee
    >

    Hi Dee Dee,
    It's the reverse of what you said. For 1 of cup flour you use 2/3 cup of
    oil. In the microwave you have to put in a bit more oil than that, as
    needed. The usual ratio for making a roux with butter is 1 part butter to 1
    part flour. For olive oil it is less, particularly on the stove. As per your
    example when I want to make a very brown roux I will do it on the stove top
    with 1 cup of flour and 2/3 cup oil and store the unused portion in the
    frig. It will last a long time, as long as the oil can be left in the frig,
    and much longer than a butter based roux. I do this routinely. It is much
    more heart healthy than the old fashion roux, and it gives you a glistening,
    much nicer sauce.
    Kent
    Kent

    >
    > "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Try making your roux in the microwave using olive oil and flour, in about
    >> a 2/3 oil to 1 part flour. Microwave this on a 3 or so setting. Any oil
    >> picks up MW radiation far more than other ingredients.
    >> Then add heated milk and whisk. Heat more and whisk. Then heat a bit
    >> more and whisk.
    >> There you have it, your bechamel.
    >> Recently doing this I made the best crab newberg I've ever had, and
    >> nothing made it to the stove top. I couldn't believe it. We get live
    >> Dungeness Crab here, steam it, eat what you can, then make crab stock,
    >> and make crab newberg from the leftover, if you can imagine there being
    >> any.
    >> Kent
    >>
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> I've never made a bechamel that I would consider exceptional or even
    >>> acceptable (for me). Today I tried a different tactic.
    >>>
    >>> I was going to have a different meal altogether but when I looked in the
    >>> frig there was 3 cups of cream and some brown crimini mushrooms. The
    >>> cream was 8 days out of date, but still acceptable, and the mushrooms
    >>> might have been if-y when I bought them (in a cellophane pack).
    >>>
    >>> I cleaned up the mushrooms to where they didn't smell too amoniac and
    >>> fried them. While they were frying I got out and compared Giada's and
    >>> Mario's bechamel sauce and found that Mario's recipe fit my 3 cups of
    >>> cream (without calculating the difference of Giada's 4 cups' recipe).
    >>> Both called for milk - not cream. I didn't care because I've never made
    >>> a fit bechamel so far -- always lumpy and spending more time with lumps
    >>> than the cooking!
    >>>
    >>> I heated the cream in the microwave slowly to about 160º while I heated
    >>> the 5 T butter (both recipes called for the same amount of butter) and
    >>> then sprinkled 1/3 cup flour into it. Giada' recipe said to cook 2
    >>> minutes, Mario's said to cook 6-7 minutes. I cooked until starting to
    >>> turn a little brownish, as Mario said, maybe about 4 minutes. DH poured
    >>> the hot cream into the butter/flour mixture 1 cup at a time while I
    >>> whisked. It was very thick; I would assume mainly due to cream instead
    >>> of milk. I added 1/2 the amount of salt and nutmeg called for, and it
    >>> still was pretty pungent with salt & nutmeg. NO LUMPS!
    >>>
    >>> Then I added the finished mushrooms and the spaghetti to the big pan of
    >>> bechamel and used tongs to separate them as they cooked. This really
    >>> tasted like carbonara.
    >>>
    >>> I saved the rest of the bechamel (in the freezer) for another day.
    >>> Necessity was the mother of invention as I rescued the mushrooms and
    >>> the rest of the cream that I had bought to make chocolate truffles.
    >>>
    >>> Served with 'organic' fresh carrots, salt & pepper; butter lettuce with
    >>> oil and vinegar and a glass of wine, French for DH; Italian for me.
    >>>
    >>> It's now snack time and a movie -- thanks TJ's for salza and chips - as
    >>> they say, "Good to go."
    >>> Dee Dee
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
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