beginner inquiry

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Al Kubeluis, Feb 27, 2003.

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  1. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Guter Tag, I am new to recumbents and have 4 questions:
    1. Why are some of you riding old WWII German V2's?
    2. Do you need disk brakes or are calipers sufficient?
    3. Is there a lot of tiller effect?
    4. Is V2 unstable at slow speeds, say under mach 1? Dankt, Wernher
     
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  2. Jackal

    Jackal Guest

    "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in news:3e5e7e4e$0$2364 @dingus.crosslink.net:

    > Guter Tag, I am new to recumbents and have 4 questions:
    > 1. Why are some of you riding old WWII German V2's?
    > 2. Do you need disk brakes or are calipers sufficient?
    > 3. Is there a lot of tiller effect?
    > 4. Is V2 unstable at slow speeds, say under mach 1? Dankt, Wernher
    >
    >
    >

    1. Everyone knows that German build quality is the best. The V2's are very fast, where's
    the mystery?
    2. I find that impact with the earth does a RIGHT NOW job of braking.
    3. Not if you convert it to USS.
    4.Steering inputs are negligable, but I find nothing short of a SAM missle will deviate it's course.
     
  3. John Foltz

    John Foltz Guest

    Jackal wrote:
    > "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in news:3e5e7e4e$0$2364 @dingus.crosslink.net:
    >
    >
    >>Guter Tag, I am new to recumbents and have 4 questions:
    >>1. Why are some of you riding old WWII German V2's?
    >>2. Do you need disk brakes or are calipers sufficient?
    >>3. Is there a lot of tiller effect?
    >>4. Is V2 unstable at slow speeds, say under mach 1? Dankt, Wernher
    >
    > 1. Everyone knows that German build quality is the best. The V2's are very fast, where's the
    > mystery?
    > 2. I find that impact with the earth does a RIGHT NOW job of braking.
    > 3. Not if you convert it to USS.
    > 4.Steering inputs are negligable, but I find nothing short of a SAM missle will deviate it's
    > course.

    Thanks for the helpful answers, Jackal. The V2 is fast, but I think most Brits would rather see
    the new HPV version coming at them, rather than its WWII almost-namesake. Here are some more
    helpful answers.
    1. The name, V2 is hard to type for an text-only newsgroup. Its real name is "Vee Squared." It is a
    fitting name for the LWB counterpart to my V-Rex, which is, so I'm told, short for "velocitas
    rex," Latin for "speed king."
    2. Discs or calipers: most of us still use calipers. For the most part, disc brakes are found only
    in lowracers. But they are slowly gaining acceptance for road machines, and they are starting to
    appear on other bikes. I predict that in ten years they will be quite common. Compared to discs,
    using calipers is like dragging your feet to stop.
    3. Tiller effect on a stock V2 (I mean Vee Squared) is noticeable. That isn't necessarily bad. I
    think tiller makes a bike more stable at high speeds. But it also makes low-speed handling a
    little trickier.
    4. Recumbents in general are harder to balance than uprights at very low speeds, perhaps 3kph or
    less. Bikes with more tiller have more of a problem at these low speeds, because the hands must
    make a larger movement to correct the steering. Obviously the solution is to never go that slow!
    --

    John Foltz --- O _ Baron --- _O _ V-Rex 24/63 --- _\\/\-%)
    _________(_)`=()___________________(_)= (_)_____
     
  4. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    John Foltz <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > 3. Tiller effect on a stock V2 (I mean Vee Squared) is noticeable. That isn't necessarily bad. I
    > think tiller makes a bike more stable at high speeds.

    !?!?

    > But it also makes low-speed handling a little trickier. 4. Recumbents in general are harder to
    > balance than uprights at very low speeds, perhaps 3kph or less. Bikes with more tiller have more
    > of a problem at these low speeds, because the hands must make a larger movement to correct the
    > steering.

    I have no trouble keeping my trike balanced going slow or even stopped, and there is no tiller
    effect.( :

    rorschandt
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > 1. The name, V2 is hard to type for an text-only newsgroup. Its real name is "Vee Squared." It is
    > a fitting name for the LWB counterpart to my V-Rex, which is, so I'm told, short for "velocitas
    > rex," Latin for "speed king."

    Works for me V²... What's do hard about that? <shift>v <alt>0178

    --
    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  6. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    My thought was V^2.

    "Cletus D. Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    > > 1. The name, V2 is hard to type for an text-only newsgroup. Its real name is "Vee Squared." It
    > > is a fitting name for the LWB counterpart to my V-Rex, which is, so I'm told, short for
    > > "velocitas rex," Latin for "speed king."
    >
    > Works for me V²... What's do hard about that? <shift>v <alt>0178
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  7. On Thu, 27 Feb 2003 22:53:32 -0600, Cletus D. Lee <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >> 1. The name, V2 is hard to type for an text-only newsgroup. Its real name is "Vee Squared." It is
    >> a fitting name for the LWB counterpart to my V-Rex, which is, so I'm told, short for
    >> "velocitas rex," Latin for "speed king."
    >
    >Works for me V?... What's do hard about that? <shift>v <alt>0178

    It shows up as "V?" on my system (Japanese version of Windows, using Agent newsreader).

    Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
     
  8. "Cletus D. Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Works for me V²... What's do hard about that? <shift>v <alt>0178

    kinda tough on this laptop on the reading rack on the V2 on the Cycl-Ops doing 85 rpm doesn't work
    for me sorry
     
  9. Jackal

    Jackal Guest

    John Foltz <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Jackal wrote:
    >> "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in news:3e5e7e4e$0$2364 @dingus.crosslink.net:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Guter Tag, I am new to recumbents and have 4 questions:
    >>>1. Why are some of you riding old WWII German V2's?
    >>>2. Do you need disk brakes or are calipers sufficient?
    >>>3. Is there a lot of tiller effect?
    >>>4. Is V2 unstable at slow speeds, say under mach 1? Dankt, Wernher
    >>
    >> 1. Everyone knows that German build quality is the best. The V2's are very fast, where's the
    >> mystery?
    >> 2. I find that impact with the earth does a RIGHT NOW job of braking.
    >> 3. Not if you convert it to USS.
    >> 4.Steering inputs are negligable, but I find nothing short of a SAM missle will deviate it's
    >> course.
    >
    > Thanks for the helpful answers, Jackal. The V2 is fast, but I think most Brits would rather see
    > the new HPV version coming at them, rather than its WWII almost-namesake. Here are some more
    > helpful answers.
    > 1. The name, V2 is hard to type for an text-only newsgroup. Its real name is "Vee Squared." It is
    > a fitting name for the LWB counterpart to my V-Rex, which is, so I'm told, short for "velocitas
    > rex," Latin for "speed king."
    > 2. Discs or calipers: most of us still use calipers. For the most part, disc brakes are found only
    > in lowracers. But they are slowly gaining acceptance for road machines, and they are starting
    > to appear on other bikes. I predict that in ten years they will be quite common. Compared to
    > discs, using calipers is like dragging your feet to stop.
    > 3. Tiller effect on a stock V2 (I mean Vee Squared) is noticeable. That isn't necessarily bad. I
    > think tiller makes a bike more stable at high speeds. But it also makes low-speed handling a
    > little trickier. 4. Recumbents in general are harder to balance than uprights at very low
    > speeds, perhaps 3kph or less. Bikes with more tiller have more of a problem at these low
    > speeds, because the hands must make a larger movement to correct the steering. Obviously the
    > solution is to never go that slow!

    Well smart guy, I think the FIRST hint that he was KIDDING and actually talking ABOUT THE II V2
    would be the "unstable under Mach 1" comment. Get a clue.

    And a sense of humor.
     
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