Being Right is not Fundamental



urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
Many people think it's fundamentally important that each person's beliefs are supported by the evidence available to them, even if they include personal experiences as "evidence". I challenge this on ethical grounds. In many situations, a person can hold a dubious belief without negative consequences. The belief might even interact with their psychology in beneficial ways. Therefore, debates should proceed in the following manner:

1. The defendant gives a proposition.

2. The opponent challenges that the proposition is not supported, AND that believing the dubious proposition could have negative consequences.
These consequences could involve: providing justification for harmful actions, hindering the progress of society, et cetera.

3. The defendant counterargues one of the following:
the proposition is in fact supported;
even if it's misconcieved, it's a benign misconception;
the belief has a direct psychological benefit that outweighs the potential for unforeseen harm.



Next time somebody challenges one of your beliefs, remember that the opponent has the burden of showing that your choice might actually be important, i.e. the burden of importance.
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
2,883
281
63
Finally! Another "I am thinking of taking up cycling again for weight loss and a bit of commuting - which bottle cage?" thread and I would start chewing handlebar tape...
big-smile.png


Quote: the belief has a direct psychological benefit

Beneficial how?
big-smile.png



0.jpg
 

urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
Originally Posted by Volnix

Beneficial how?
big-smile.png
For example, even if that little girl is getting a hip-replacement, she might feel better believing it's only a tonsils-removal. Only she knows how she feels about it, so she should believe whatever she likes.
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
2,883
281
63
Originally Posted by urge2kill

For example, even if that little girl is getting a hip-replacement, she might feel better believing it's only a tonsils-removal. Only she knows how she feels about it, so she should believe whatever she likes.

U2K, c'mon... He's gonna start the briefing!
big-smile.png
(You in the army yet???
big-smile.png
)



"He he he
big-smile.png
, say man, agree to this ... You might be 5-0, "Controversial!"
big-smile.png



0.jpg



0.jpg



0.jpg
 

urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
That was inappropriate. Old habits are hard to break.

I don't like that particular song. Folk music is ruined when you reduce it to guitar and solo vocals, and the electric guitar barely revived it. The rest of that Dead Brothers album, Wunderkammer, is a good blend of traditional instruments with electric guitar.
But if you want manly, try the Magnetic Fields. Damn, you know just from the album cover of the chick with the rifle that this is music for a true alpha male. *beats chest*
big-smile.png


0.jpg
 

urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
Subject/object dyslexia

Did your dog give it to the vet anally or orally? There it goes again!
 

urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
I added more after that. Unfortunately, our creepy military rendered my play on words rather disturbing.
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
2,883
281
63
Well, I was technically -in- the ferry, as my cabin had no windows...

But I was also -on- the ferry.

-In- the ferry, there were a few music halls. With Live Music!

Since the "clientele" were truck drivers, potheads (it was going to Holland) and duty free booze shoppers, the music was Marilyn Monroe lookalikes, some creepy variété types etc.

It was that ferry. It was a good ferry.

I had a whole bottle of martini with some oranges that I had in my back pack for breakfast. Or was that another ferry?
big-smile.png



 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
2,883
281
63
I seem to be meeting a lot of creeps lately.

It's harshing my buzz!
sad.png
 

urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
That sounds like a dangerous beer. I'm sober (since last night), but I might give it a taste (for 15 seconds without stopping).

New Soapbox Topic

Religion is Hedonistic
Hedonism is often misrepresented as indiscriminate indulgence when in fact, many hedonistic philosophies consider long-term consequences, and an ethical hedonist places the happiness of the whole over his own. The sole unifying thread is the inherent value of certain mental states, and many religions are in fact hedonistic. A Christian abstains from certain pleasures in hopes of obtaining a pleasurable afterlife. A Buddhist abstains from indulgence because she believes it perpetuates the wheel of samsara, the sufferings of the world. Both are essentially hedonistic.
 

limerickman

Well-Known Member
Jan 5, 2004
16,130
220
63
Originally Posted by urge2kill
That sounds like a dangerous beer. I'm sober (since last night), but I might give it a taste (for 15 seconds without stopping).

New Soapbox Topic

Religion is Hedonistic
Hedonism is often misrepresented as indiscriminate indulgence when in fact, many hedonistic philosophies consider long-term consequences, and an ethical hedonist places the happiness of the whole over his own. The sole unifying thread is the inherent value of certain mental states, and many religions are in fact hedonistic. A Christian abstains from certain pleasures in hopes of obtaining a pleasurable afterlife. A Buddhist abstains from indulgence because she believes it perpetuates the wheel of samsara, the sufferings of the world. Both are essentially hedonistic.
Hmmm.

Hedonism doesn't form any part of the Christian notion of the afterlife.

On the other hand, Islam teaches that the afterlife can include 72 virgins in their afterlife in certain circumstances.
(I'm not singling out Islam btw, just saying that some religions do actually account for hedonism in the afterlife).
 

urge2kill

Member
Aug 13, 2013
448
20
0
It's implied that the person will be happy (pleased) in heaven, albeit perhaps a yet unknown kind of pleasure. Otherwise it wouldn't make sense to want heaven.