bell really needed in Manhattan?



R

R Brickston

Guest
On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 18:14:00 GMT, Bill Baka <[email protected]> wrote:

>R Brickston wrote:
>> On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 21:43:56 GMT, Bill Baka <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>> Bob wrote:
>>>> Bill Baka wrote:

>>
>>> Bob,
>>> I have personally experienced bad cops and bad judges AND bad D.A.'s.
>>> I have been given totally bogus traffic tickets by a group of cops
>>> setting up a speed trap in a place where it was physically impossible to
>>> speed. They had each other to back themselves up and I was a lone
>>> commuter in my car.
>>> Corrupt.

>>
>> So you couldn't come back with a camera to detail this alleged
>> impossibilty in court?

>
>I did that once when a cop singled me out of a line of cars making a
>left turn to go to a junk yard in 1966. That was standard practice and
>happened all day long. The cop hinted (under his breath) that he wanted
>to make sure to get teenagers to give them respect for the law. It had
>the opposite effect. I stood out there and took a whole roll of picture
>of cars, sometimes convoys, crossing that line and the judge refused to
>look at them, telling me that, "So what, they were breaking the law,
>too". Then why the hell did that sorry assed excuse for a cop single me
>out? Because I was a teen and least likely to get a lawyer. When I said
>not guilty and I wanted a trial with a lawyer he said "sorry, you can't
>have a trial over a traffic ticket so I find you 'Guilty'".
>I sure gained a LOT of respect for the law that day. Like ****.


Those things always have to be taken to the next court. Probably not
an option for a teenager, but with patience, since you claim to have a
132+ IQ, it could have been done.

>>
>>> I have been arrested for DUI even though I was neither drunk nor even
>>> driving. When I demanded a blood test the technician said "clean" but
>>> the officer demanded he mark is as a positive. Santa Clara city P.D.
>>> Corrupt #2.
>>> When I went to court on this the D.A. said he would accept a plea
>>> bargain for "Dry reckless" but if I plead not guilty he could guarantee
>>> jail time.
>>> Corrupt D.A.

>>
>> This is far fetched and stretches the imagination.

>
>Everything stretches your feeble imagination, doofus.


Who you calling "doofus," Doofus. In any event the only things that
stretch the imagination are those events that occur on Planet Baka.

>
>If this alleged
>> incident occurred, the drill would be to get the tech to testify under
>> oath in court.

>
>Requiring a lawyer, most of whom want about $2,000 up front just to talk
>to you, much less do the leg work for a traffic ticket. If I had $5K to
>blow I might have, but that was during one of my work droughts. Soon
>after I got a much better job up in the wine country and never saw
>another Santa Clara cop. I won't drive down there now unless somebody I
>know dies or I have a 6 figure job offer, High 6 figure.
>Bill Baka
>


If your story is true, after all it is an event that took place on
Planet Baka, you file a subpoena for the tech to appear, prior to the
court date. Then, the tech has a career decision to make, he either
lies under oath or tells the DA what actually happened, if the latter,
your case gets dropped.
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Bob wrote:
> Bill Baka wrote:
>> Bob wrote:
>>> Bill Baka wrote:
>>>
>>>> Bob,
>>>> I have personally experienced bad cops and bad judges AND bad D.A.'s.
>>> ---snip---
>>>
>>>> Do you actually think I would agree with the guy for no good reason.
>>>> Bill Baka
>>> So you're biased in favor of believing that all cops, judges, and
>>> prosecutors are bad. When did bias become a "good reason"?
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Bob Hunt
>>>

>> Touche,
>> But you are probably biased by being part of the system. I am not bad
>> mouthing you, but sometimes when you are in the middle of it and
>> isolated from what goes on outside your turf, you really don't know.
>> I have seen some very good officers, but way too many that think the
>> badge and gun makes them God.
>> Bill Baka

>
> Of course I'm biased. We all are in one way or another. Recognizing
> that basic law of human nature is the first step toward objectivity.
> It's also all the more reason to not rely on any single person's
> version of an event when evaluating that event.
>
> Regards,
> Bob Hunt
>

I have to agree that in the heat of the moment things do get remembered
wrong sometimes, but I still am not going for the cop arresting the
victim for wanting him to do his job. Disobeying an officer? Was he just
supposed to go home and forget about it? Maybe the officer in question
should be assigned bicycle patrol for about 3 months and see what his
opinion is then???
Bill Baka
 
B

Bob

Guest
Bill Baka wrote:

> I have to agree that in the heat of the moment things do get remembered
> wrong sometimes, but I still am not going for the cop arresting the
> victim for wanting him to do his job. Disobeying an officer? Was he just
> supposed to go home and forget about it? Maybe the officer in question
> should be assigned bicycle patrol for about 3 months and see what his
> opinion is then???
> Bill Baka


Bill, it's apparent that you are simply accepting the blogger's
statement, "I was the victim", at face value. Perhaps you are never
going to realize (or at least admit) that not everyone that claims to
be or appears to be a victim *is* a victim.
Case in point-
Almost 20 years ago when I was still fairly new on the job I happened
to be on the scene of a house fire when a naked man came running out of
the house that was rapidly filling with smoke. Giving him a blanket and
putting him in an ambulance seemed the humane thing to do but an older
cop on the scene grabbed him, cuffed him, and threw him in the back of
his squad car. Anyone seeing that would have likely thought as I did-
"What an asshole!"- until the older cop explained, "That house has been
abandoned for months. Homeless squatters as a rule don't sleep in the
nude. Firebugs that like to start fires so they can watch the pretty
flames while they masturbate sometimes unintentionally let the fire get
a little out of control since they are kinda busy. Call it a heat of
the moment kind of thing."
The firemen found the guy's clothes folded neatly by the door. Right
next to the two empty cans of charcoal starter fluid.
What's obvious is always obvious but it's not always true.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Bob wrote:
> Bill Baka wrote:
>
>> I have to agree that in the heat of the moment things do get remembered
>> wrong sometimes, but I still am not going for the cop arresting the
>> victim for wanting him to do his job. Disobeying an officer? Was he just
>> supposed to go home and forget about it? Maybe the officer in question
>> should be assigned bicycle patrol for about 3 months and see what his
>> opinion is then???
>> Bill Baka

>
> Bill, it's apparent that you are simply accepting the blogger's
> statement, "I was the victim", at face value. Perhaps you are never
> going to realize (or at least admit) that not everyone that claims to
> be or appears to be a victim *is* a victim.


That much I do know, but that is usually a domestic violence kind of
thing. Wife hits husband, he reacts, she calls police. It can happen
with two strangers on the street too, but I have been on the receiving
end of many red necks and teenagers-twenty somethings yelling, honking,
or just speeding up to see if they could scare me into a ditch. I tend
to be on the side of the cyclist.
> Case in point-
> Almost 20 years ago when I was still fairly new on the job I happened
> to be on the scene of a house fire when a naked man came running out of
> the house that was rapidly filling with smoke. Giving him a blanket and
> putting him in an ambulance seemed the humane thing to do but an older
> cop on the scene grabbed him, cuffed him, and threw him in the back of
> his squad car. Anyone seeing that would have likely thought as I did-
> "What an asshole!"- until the older cop explained, "That house has been
> abandoned for months. Homeless squatters as a rule don't sleep in the
> nude. Firebugs that like to start fires so they can watch the pretty
> flames while they masturbate sometimes unintentionally let the fire get
> a little out of control since they are kinda busy. Call it a heat of
> the moment kind of thing."
> The firemen found the guy's clothes folded neatly by the door. Right
> next to the two empty cans of charcoal starter fluid.
> What's obvious is always obvious but it's not always true.


Ok,
That one pegs my 'Weird-ometer". I have never heard of a nut job like
that before. I sleep in my birthday suit but I would certainly grab
something before running out the door even with a fire.
It seems there are more nut cases than I realized.
This will certainly make me have a more open mind.
Bill Baka
>
> Regards,
> Bob Hunt
>
 
B

Bob

Guest
Bill Baka wrote:
>
> Ok,
> That one pegs my 'Weird-ometer". I have never heard of a nut job like
> that before. I sleep in my birthday suit but I would certainly grab
> something before running out the door even with a fire.
> It seems there are more nut cases than I realized.
> This will certainly make me have a more open mind.
> Bill Baka


It may sound weird but I've learned since then that if you discount
insurance fraud and revenge arsons, most arsons have a definite sexual
motivation. That's a very big reason that, except for those seeking
revenge for an injury whether real or imagined, arsonists are
overwhelmingly male. Females are overrepresented in revenge arsons
though so it all kind of evens out. ;-)

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
C

Chris Z The Wheelman

Guest
Technically, South Carolina has a similar law, and some bike
organizations are trying to get it repealed, if for no other reason that
a bell is pretty much useless except perhaps on a bike path or trail (I
do have one on my MTB).

I have never had one on my road tourer and have yet to be cited in the
five years I've ridden here. Most cops are ignorant of the _important_
laws regarding bicycling (the number of wrong way riders on the roads
prove this nicely).

- -
Comments and opinions compliments of,
"Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

My web Site:
http://geocities.com/czcorner

To E-mail me:
ChrisZCorner "at" webtv "dot" net
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Bob wrote:
> Bill Baka wrote:
>> Ok,
>> That one pegs my 'Weird-ometer". I have never heard of a nut job like
>> that before. I sleep in my birthday suit but I would certainly grab
>> something before running out the door even with a fire.
>> It seems there are more nut cases than I realized.
>> This will certainly make me have a more open mind.
>> Bill Baka

>
> It may sound weird but I've learned since then that if you discount
> insurance fraud and revenge arsons, most arsons have a definite sexual
> motivation. That's a very big reason that, except for those seeking
> revenge for an injury whether real or imagined, arsonists are
> overwhelmingly male. Females are overrepresented in revenge arsons
> though so it all kind of evens out. ;-)
>
> Regards,
> Bob Hunt
>

Sexual motivation? To start a fire? Is that why the profile of an
arsonist includes hanging around to watch the fire?
Bill (scratching my head) Baka
 
B

Bob

Guest
Bill Baka wrote:

> Sexual motivation? To start a fire? Is that why the profile of an
> arsonist includes hanging around to watch the fire?
> Bill (scratching my head) Baka


To answer your questions- yes, yes, and yes. But this is getting
awfully far afield, even by RBM standards.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
R

R Brickston

Guest
On 11 Sep 2006 22:39:53 -0700, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Bill Baka wrote:
>
>> Sexual motivation? To start a fire? Is that why the profile of an
>> arsonist includes hanging around to watch the fire?
>> Bill (scratching my head) Baka

>
>To answer your questions- yes, yes, and yes. But this is getting
>awfully far afield, even by RBM standards.
>
>Regards,
>Bob Hunt


Far afield? I don't know, has Baka checked in on this thread and
opined with an 800 word dissertation?
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Bob wrote:
> Bill Baka wrote:
>
>> Sexual motivation? To start a fire? Is that why the profile of an
>> arsonist includes hanging around to watch the fire?
>> Bill (scratching my head) Baka

>
> To answer your questions- yes, yes, and yes. But this is getting
> awfully far afield, even by RBM standards.
>
> Regards,
> Bob Hunt
>

Yeah,
At least I got out on the bike today but California is still HOT. It was
95 degrees when I went out and now I long for the wet season. I still
have to use the mountain bike to go off road and avoid getting flattened
by all the semis. No road bike worthy areas around here.
<sigh>
Bill Baka
 
Earl Bollinger wrote:

> I think the problem is there is a small percentage (2%?) of the
> CM folks who are intentionally out there looking for trouble.
> They carry knives or other weapons, and if anyone dares to cross
> their imaginary line, they explode into anger and mayhem.


=v= I have never heard of knives or weapons being used in CM.
Where do you get this scenario from?
<_Jym_>