Bent biking in Nova Scotia?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Carol Cohen, Jun 26, 2003.

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  1. Carol Cohen

    Carol Cohen Guest

    There's plenty of info on biking in N.S. elsewhere. I just want to know how it is for recumbents --
    too hilly? Narrow high-crowned roads? Short crowded tourist season?

    C.C.
     
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  2. Try "Cape Breton Island"....perfect asphalt roads. There was a chap here last year who had a Low
    Racer and he described his rides as nothing shy of fantastic. Sounded like Lancaster Penn. Amish
    country minus the tourists. N.S.....like most Canadian provinces it has all the people jammed into a
    few large cities and then nothing for 100 miles of agricultural lands/forests/scrub. Don't suppose
    you are coming up here to Canada to take advantage of our new Drug Laws (after your recent bout with
    the rubber roofing cement). Ever since Marijuana became LEGAL Americans have been thinking Canada
    looks like a good place to visit. So now Gays can LEGALLY marry as well and the Federal government
    is using tax $ to stage a "Free" Rolling Stones/ACDC Plus concert for 1/2 million people in Toronto

    Try Prince Edward Island or NFLD. P.E.I. is a cyclists heaven...no hills to speak of and hardly any
    people. NFLD is the place I would luv to retire to....the Province is the size of Great Britain and
    the Police do not yet carry guns. The place has good roads because of a depressed economy re: the
    only thing to do there is to keep doing government contracts to maintain roads. The way the U.S.
    economy has been going, you'll feel at home in NFLD.
    --------------------------------------
    "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB2076E7.4DCFE%[email protected]...
    > There's plenty of info on biking in N.S. elsewhere. I just want to know
    how
    > it is for recumbents -- too hilly? Narrow high-crowned roads? Short crowded tourist season?
    >
    > C.C.
     
  3. Carol Cohen

    Carol Cohen Guest

    > From: "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]>

    > Try "Cape Breton Island"....perfect asphalt roads.

    But isn't Cape Breton pretty hilly?

    > There was a chap here last year who had a Low Racer and he described his rides as nothing shy of
    > fantastic. Sounded like Lancaster Penn. Amish country minus the tourists. N.S.....like most
    > Canadian provinces it has all the people jammed into a few large cities and then nothing for 100
    > miles of agricultural lands/forests/scrub.

    The way we shoulda done it in the U.S., avoiding urban sprawl.

    > Don't suppose you are coming up here to Canada to take advantage of our new Drug Laws (after your
    > recent bout with the rubber roofing cement). Ever since Marijuana became LEGAL Americans have been
    > thinking Canada looks like a good place to visit. So now Gays can LEGALLY marry as well and the
    > Federal government is using tax $ to stage a "Free" Rolling Stones/ACDC Plus concert for 1/2
    > million people in Toronto

    Gosh -- if I go to Canada do I have to turn gay and do drugs? How about if I learn to be a nice mild
    person instead?
    >
    > Try Prince Edward Island or NFLD. P.E.I. is a cyclists heaven...no hills to speak of and hardly
    > any people. NFLD is the place I would luv to retire to....the Province is the size of Great
    > Britain and the Police do not yet carry guns. The place has good roads because of a depressed
    > economy re: the only thing to do there is to keep doing government contracts to maintain roads.
    > The way the U.S. economy has been going, you'll feel at home in NFLD.

    Years ago (before bikes were invented) DH and I visited N.S. and went back to Boston via P.E.I. It
    has the rich orange soil that reminds me of southeastern U.S. And so carefully farmed that the
    potato fields roll right down to the road's edge, no trash/tractor roadside zone. Whereas N.S.
    reminded me of Scotland.

    The only problem with living in any of the maritime provinces is their latitude -- long, dark
    winters, lots of D.W.I.s possibly hitting cyclists.

    I read somewhere that there's a ferry from N.S. to Newfoundland. I'd love to visit NFLD, since I'm
    about the size & shape of one of their famous dogs. (Not biking lately and it shows.)

    A neighbor here is building a house in N.S. and a bike trip would be a perfect way to visit her
    next year.

    Thanks, Joshua.

    C.C.
     
  4. There is a Ferry running direct from Boston to Yarmouth N.S. (Nova Scotia = New Scotland). Highland
    Games in July and everyone goes pro-Scotland for a few weeks. Cape Breton Island is a Hill, the road
    skirts the Ocean....one side the Island and the other side is Ocean. I believe (without checking)
    the route is called the Cabot Trail.

    "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB20B5D2.4DD34%[email protected]...
    >
    > > From: "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]>
    >
    > > Try "Cape Breton Island"....perfect asphalt roads.
    >
    > But isn't Cape Breton pretty hilly?
    >
    > > There was a chap here last year who had a Low Racer and he described his rides as nothing shy of
    > > fantastic. Sounded like Lancaster Penn. Amish country minus the tourists. N.S.....like most
    > > Canadian provinces it has
    all
    > > the people jammed into a few large cities and then nothing for 100 miles
    of
    > > agricultural lands/forests/scrub.
    >
    > The way we shoulda done it in the U.S., avoiding urban sprawl.
    >
    > > Don't suppose you are coming up here to Canada to take advantage of our
    new
    > > Drug Laws (after your recent bout with the rubber roofing cement). Ever since Marijuana became
    > > LEGAL Americans have been thinking Canada
    looks
    > > like a good place to visit. So now Gays can LEGALLY marry as well and
    the
    > > Federal government is using tax $ to stage a "Free" Rolling Stones/ACDC
    Plus
    > > concert for 1/2 million people in Toronto
    >
    > Gosh -- if I go to Canada do I have to turn gay and do drugs? How about if
    I
    > learn to be a nice mild person instead?
    > >
    > > Try Prince Edward Island or NFLD. P.E.I. is a cyclists heaven...no hills
    to
    > > speak of and hardly any people. NFLD is the place I would luv to retire to....the Province is
    > > the size of Great Britain and the Police do not
    yet
    > > carry guns. The place has good roads because of a depressed economy re:
    the
    > > only thing to do there is to keep doing government contracts to maintain roads. The way the U.S.
    > > economy has been going, you'll feel at home in
    NFLD.
    >
    > Years ago (before bikes were invented) DH and I visited N.S. and went back to Boston via P.E.I. It
    > has the rich orange soil that reminds me of southeastern U.S. And so carefully farmed that the
    > potato fields roll
    right
    > down to the road's edge, no trash/tractor roadside zone. Whereas N.S. reminded me of Scotland.
    >
    > The only problem with living in any of the maritime provinces is their latitude -- long, dark
    > winters, lots of D.W.I.s possibly hitting cyclists.
    >
    > I read somewhere that there's a ferry from N.S. to Newfoundland. I'd love to visit NFLD, since I'm
    > about the size & shape of one of their famous
    dogs.
    > (Not biking lately and it shows.)
    >
    > A neighbor here is building a house in N.S. and a bike trip would be a perfect way to visit her
    > next year.
    >
    > Thanks, Joshua.
    >
    > C.C.
     
  5. Ron Friedel

    Ron Friedel Guest

    We rode on the Lighthouse Tour (MOOSA) in Nova Scotia in 1998. I really liked it. For me Nova Scotia
    has a very good mix of cultures, French, German, English and even Loyalist Afro-Americans. It can be
    hilly but the roads were generally fairly quiet. We took the high-speed "Cat" ferry from Bar Harbor.
    There also are ferries from Portland, Maine and St. John, New Brunswick to Digby, I think. The Maine
    ferries pull in at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

    We were camped one place on my birthday and the local day-care kids came over to look at our
    recumbent tandem, a Ryan Fleetwood (AKA Duplex). When they found out that it was my birthday, they
    went back and got some cupcakes and sparklers and came back to help us celebrate my birthday. Cute!

    Ron Friedel

    "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB2076E7.4DCFE%[email protected]...
    > There's plenty of info on biking in N.S. elsewhere. I just want to know
    how
    > it is for recumbents -- too hilly? Narrow high-crowned roads? Short crowded tourist season?
    >
    > C.C.
     
  6. Harv

    Harv Guest

    Lox is their middle name, but can you get a good bagel in N.S.? "Carol Cohen"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB2076E7.4DCFE%[email protected]...
    > There's plenty of info on biking in N.S. elsewhere. I just want to know
    how
    > it is for recumbents -- too hilly? Narrow high-crowned roads? Short crowded tourist season?
    >
    > C.C.
     
  7. Devon

    Devon Guest

    > "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BB2076E7.4DCFE%[email protected]...

    > > There's plenty of info on biking in N.S. elsewhere. I just want to know
    > how
    > > it is for recumbents -- too hilly? Narrow high-crowned roads? Short crowded tourist season?
    > >
    > > C.C.
    > >

    I did the Lighthouse Tour 2002 on a Vision 54. Hills are not a problem. Friendly folk, and for the
    most part very courteous drivers. Traffic was not heavy (late July/early August.
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I ride a Ryan Vanguard and a BikeFriday Sat-R Day. I have done quite a bit of self contained touring
    in Maine, New Hampshire, Quebec, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Labrador(Croatia, Bosnia, Corsica,
    and Sardinia). Yes, I've also ridden the Light House Tour twice and prefer Moosa.

    My advice on Nova Scotia is keep going, go to Newfoundland. It's beautiful, quiet, and little
    traffic. You can also ride to the only verified Viking settlement in North America. This ride of a
    life time (if you don't go to Sardinia that is), you'll never forget the experience of riding on
    beautiful roads with no traffic except when the ferry lands.

    Nova Scotia is boring and Cape Breton isn't safe in the summer time. When I was there about 4 years
    ago the Cabot Trail was filled with travel trailers that were wider than the road and had mirrors
    sticking out about head height (they probabally miss a recumbent). The first day I saw 6 riders hit
    by a mirror or forced off the road. Going over those low rails is no fun. I tell everyone to waint
    until Septemeber if you want to ride Cape Breton.

    The hills in Cape Breton are not easy for a recumbent, especially with that mile long line of
    trailer and pick ups behind you. There are many places as pretty and more fun to ride. I like
    Newfoundland, but Quebec and Maine can be fun. In fact got to New Brunswick and ride through
    Capabello back to Bar Harbor. Or ride to Montrael from Showhegan and follow the rive to Jackman.

    Enjoy the ride and for recumbents, enjoy the view.
     
  9. We agree on NFLD...I had a friend who went the full trip south to north. He intended to spend a few
    weeks cycling before going to the London School of Economics and he fell in love with NFLD and
    cycled around for 3 months (missing the start of Univ.). The Cabot Trail is best "off season" which
    was when I thought Carol said she'd be there. Mennonite country is cool too with the
    orchards...Annapolis Valley is the name (cannot remember as it has been many years).
    *******************

    > I ride a Ryan Vanguard and a BikeFriday Sat-R Day. I have done quite a bit of self contained
    > touring in Maine, New Hampshire, Quebec, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Labrador(Croatia, Bosnia,
    > Corsica, and Sardinia). Yes, I've also ridden the Light House Tour twice and prefer Moosa.
    >
    > My advice on Nova Scotia is keep going, go to Newfoundland. It's
    beautiful,
    > quiet, and little traffic. You can also ride to the only verified Viking settlement in North
    > America. This ride of a life time (if you don't go to Sardinia that is), you'll never forget the
    > experience of riding on
    beautiful
    > roads with no traffic except when the ferry lands.
    >
    > Nova Scotia is boring and Cape Breton isn't safe in the summer time. When
    I
    > was there about 4 years ago the Cabot Trail was filled with travel
    trailers
    > that were wider than the road and had mirrors sticking out about head
    height
    > (they probabally miss a recumbent). The first day I saw 6 riders hit by a mirror or forced off the
    > road. Going over those low rails is no fun. I
    tell
    > everyone to waint until Septemeber if you want to ride Cape Breton.
    >
    > The hills in Cape Breton are not easy for a recumbent, especially with
    that
    > mile long line of trailer and pick ups behind you. There are many places
    as
    > pretty and more fun to ride. I like Newfoundland, but Quebec and Maine can be fun. In fact got to
    > New Brunswick and ride through Capabello back to
    Bar
    > Harbor. Or ride to Montrael from Showhegan and follow the rive to Jackman.
    >
    > Enjoy the ride and for recumbents, enjoy the view.
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Gene

    Traveling in Newfoundland is easy. There aren't many roads. Logistics make riding the West Coast
    much easier. That's good because the best cycling is on the west coast.

    Roughly your route will be:

    Ferry lands at Port aux Basques for there you go north to:

    The route is Route 1 (Corner Brook and Deer Lake)and the to St. Anthony on the Viking Trail (430).
    At Deer Lake you leave TransCanadian Highway for the Viking Trail. You follow the Viking Trail
    (route 430) to St. Anthony. It's that simple. L'anse aux Meadows,the Viking site is near St.
    Anthony. Any road map will do for navigation, there aren't many roads. You won't get lost.

    There is a ferry from St. Barbie to Blanc Sablon if you'd like to do some riding in Labrador. There
    only about 50 miles of highway in Labrador in the Southeast but that is enough.

    Here's a few resources I used:

    Ratings for all of the roads: <http://www.atlanticcanadacycling.com/bikeroutes/newfoundland/>

    Weather: <http://www.weatheroffice.ec.gc.ca/forecast/canada/nf_e.html>

    Very helpful sites: <http://www.atlanticcanadacycling.com/a2p.html>
    <http://www.atlanticcanadacycling.com/newfoundland/> (read this carefully)

    Some nice pictures of the ride: <http://www.atlanticcanadacycling.com/newfoundland/tour/album.html#>

    Viking Trail: <http://www.vikingtrail.org/>

    Plan on taking the bus back from St. Anthony (CHECK DATE AND TIME, IT DOESN'T RUN EVERY DAY). It is
    possible to ride back but the steady 30 MPH wind will be in your face on the way back not behind you
    like on the way up.

    The best part of the ride is from Port aux Basques to Deer Lake. Once you hit the coast it's a
    sleigh ride in that wind.

    I recommend mid July for the ride. The weather before and after that is more unpredictable. In fact
    you might find July a little cooler than you expect, remember when you are riding by the water you
    can expect to see Ice Bergs.

    I hope that gets you started. Take a look at some of the pictures at the sites above, they are
    beautiful. Newfoundland is a unique place. I've never seen tabletop geology before. Plus a few
    hundred miles with a 30 MPG tailwind, not too shabby.

    Enjoy the ride ... Roland
     
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