bent hub or axle or ??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Heathcliff Bamb, Jun 14, 2003.

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  1. If I pick up the bike and spin the rear wheel, I can see the gear cluster swaying slightly as the
    wheel rotates. Is it a bad axle, hub or what? It's an old road bike wheel with a freewheel on it and
    a quick-release axle. I don't really notice any problem when riding the bike but I fear this will
    lead to some sort of problem down the road, so to speak. TIA
     
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  2. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Heathcliff Bambino? writes under pseudonym:

    > If I pick up the bike and spin the rear wheel, I can see the gear cluster swaying slightly as the
    > wheel rotates. Is it a bad axle, hub or what? It's an old road bike wheel with a freewheel on it
    > and a quick-release axle. I don't really notice any problem when riding the bike but I fear this
    > will lead to some sort of problem down the road, so to speak.

    This is common with freewheels. The FW body is not exactly perpendicular to the face that
    bears against the hub and that face is not always true either. It a beauty mark that has no
    effect. Use it.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  3. I don't think I've ever seen a freewheel that doesn't sway slightly (The old Meadas (Sun-Tour) even
    clicked slightly in the higher gears, until I greased the bearings.

    Unless it's a really expensive freewheel, like Campagnolo, I wouldn't worry about it.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Heathcliff Bambino" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If I pick up the bike and spin the rear wheel, I can see the gear cluster swaying slightly as the
    > wheel rotates. Is it a bad axle, hub or what? It's an old road bike wheel with a freewheel on it
    > and a quick-release axle. I don't really notice any problem when riding the bike but I fear this
    > will lead to some sort of problem down the road, so to speak. TIA

    Some amount of float is inherent to a freewheel system. If that started or increased suddenly, you
    have a broken axle or a serious beraing problem. Open the hub.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Andrew Muzi writes:

    >> If I pick up the bike and spin the rear wheel, I can see the gear cluster swaying slightly as the
    >> wheel rotates. Is it a bad axle, hub or what? It's an old road bike wheel with a freewheel on it
    >> and a quick-release axle. I don't really notice any problem when riding the bike but I fear this
    >> will lead to some sort of problem down the road, so to speak.

    > Some amount of float is inherent to a freewheel system. If that started or increased suddenly, you
    > have a broken axle or a serious bearing problem. Open the hub.

    A broken axle or "bearing problem" cannot make a freewheel, or for that matter, a wheel wobble.
    Axles do not rotate and therefore cannot make anything wobble although the wheel may run off axis.
    That would mean the clearance to the brake or chainstays would be asymmetric in comparison to what
    it would be without that defect. This is not something easily detected.

    It is freewheel attachment to the hub that causes this effect, as was previously mentioned.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  6. [email protected] wrote in message news:<ctcHa.2784$%[email protected]>...
    > Andrew Muzi writes:
    >
    > >> If I pick up the bike and spin the rear wheel, I can see the gear cluster swaying slightly as
    > >> the wheel rotates. Is it a bad axle, hub or what? It's an old road bike wheel with a freewheel
    > >> on it and a quick-release axle. I don't really notice any problem when riding the bike but I
    > >> fear this will lead to some sort of problem down the road, so to speak.
    >
    > > Some amount of float is inherent to a freewheel system. If that started or increased suddenly,
    > > you have a broken axle or a serious bearing problem. Open the hub.
    >
    > A broken axle or "bearing problem" cannot make a freewheel, or for that matter, a wheel wobble.
    > Axles do not rotate and therefore cannot make anything wobble although the wheel may run off axis.
    > That would mean the clearance to the brake or chainstays would be asymmetric in comparison to what
    > it would be without that defect. This is not something easily detected.
    >
    > It is freewheel attachment to the hub that causes this effect, as was previously mentioned.
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA

    Thanks for the reassurance. A little background: I had just swapped in this wheel, using the same
    freewheel and axle I had before, so the only thing that changed really is the hub. I had just never
    seen this sway before -- I figured either it was the hub, or I screwed something up, or it always
    did that but I never noticed before. But I think I would have noticed. I will keep riding and *try*
    not to think about
    it. Thanks again.
     
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