bent spokes from jammed chain

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dan Daniel, May 17, 2003.

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  1. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    I recently took off the freewheel from a wheel that someone gave me a year ago. A 'Wheelsmith'
    wheel, Mavic MA40 rim, 36h, Specialized hub, non-butted spokes. Nothing special, just needed
    something for a 6 speed.

    I saw that some of the spokes on the freewheel side had some bends about 1-1/2 inch from the hub.
    Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner, not me). A
    subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it looks as if the
    spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are about 2mm long, or less.

    Other than that, the wheel is fine for what it is. True, spins, and holds my tire and freewheel
    where I need them to be. I am not a racer, and this bike is used mainly for day trips at a
    medium pace.

    Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded touring,
    could this push them into failure?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Dan Daniel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently took off the freewheel from a wheel that someone gave me a year ago. A 'Wheelsmith'
    > wheel, Mavic MA40 rim, 36h, Specialized hub, non-butted spokes. Nothing special, just needed
    > something for a 6 speed.
    >
    > I saw that some of the spokes on the freewheel side had some bends about 1-1/2 inch from the hub.
    > Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner, not me). A
    > subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it looks as if
    > the spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are about 2mm long,
    > or less.
    >
    > Other than that, the wheel is fine for what it is. True, spins, and holds my tire and freewheel
    > where I need them to be. I am not a racer, and this bike is used mainly for day trips at a
    > medium pace.
    >
    > Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded
    > touring, could this push them into failure?
    >
    > Thanks.

    For the $10 it'll take to fix it ($2 if you do it yourself..) I'd definitely replace them. What the
    heck? You have the freewheel off, so no big deal. Takes 5 mins and it's definitely worth the
    trouble...oh, and stick a plastic spoke protector in there when you re-assemble!! ;-) This is sure
    to generate loads of posts about the uselessness of a spoke protector on a well-tuned bike, but I
    still think they're a great thing for $1.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  3. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    << Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner, not me). A
    subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it looks as if the
    spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are about 2mm long, or less.

    Other than that, the wheel is fine for what it is. True, spins, and holds my tire and freewheel
    where I need them to be. I am not a racer, and this bike is used mainly for day trips at a
    medium pace.

    Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded touring,
    could this push them into failure? >>

    The sharp digs in the spokes caused by the chain are stress risers. Speaking from personal
    experience, it's very possible that one of the damaged spokes could break. I would advise you to
    replace all the bad spokes before riding that wheel very far from home.
     
  4. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Dan Daniel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I recently took off the freewheel from a wheel that someone gave me a year ago. A 'Wheelsmith'
    > > wheel, Mavic MA40 rim, 36h, Specialized hub, non-butted spokes. Nothing special, just needed
    > > something for a 6 speed.
    > >
    > > I saw that some of the spokes on the freewheel side had some bends about 1-1/2 inch from the
    > > hub. Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner, not
    > > me). A subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it looks
    > > as if the spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are about 2mm
    > > long, or less.
    > >
    > > Other than that, the wheel is fine for what it is. True, spins, and holds my tire and freewheel
    > > where I need them to be. I am not a racer, and this bike is used mainly for day trips at a
    > > medium pace.
    > >
    > > Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded
    > > touring, could this push them into failure?
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    >
    > For the $10 it'll take to fix it ($2 if you do it yourself..) I'd
    definitely
    > replace them. What the heck? You have the freewheel off, so no big deal. Takes 5 mins and it's
    > definitely worth the trouble...oh, and stick a
    plastic
    > spoke protector in there when you re-assemble!! ;-) This is sure to generate loads of posts about
    > the uselessness of a spoke protector on a well-tuned bike, but I still think they're a great
    > thing for $1.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Scott..

    Until they snap, catch under the chain and direct the chain INTO the spokes. And yes, it happened to
    me, I have no idea how it managed to do it so damn well though ;)

    Jon Bond
     
  5. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Dan Daniel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I recently took off the freewheel from a wheel that someone gave me a year ago. A 'Wheelsmith'
    > > > wheel, Mavic MA40 rim, 36h, Specialized hub, non-butted spokes. Nothing special, just needed
    > > > something for a 6 speed.
    > > >
    > > > I saw that some of the spokes on the freewheel side had some bends about 1-1/2 inch from the
    > > > hub. Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner,
    > > > not me). A subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it
    > > > looks as if the spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are
    > > > about 2mm long, or less.
    > > >
    > > > Other than that, the wheel is fine for what it is. True, spins, and holds my tire and
    > > > freewheel where I need them to be. I am not a racer, and this bike is used mainly for day
    > > > trips at a medium pace.
    > > >
    > > > Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded
    > > > touring, could this push them into failure?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks.
    > >
    > > For the $10 it'll take to fix it ($2 if you do it yourself..) I'd
    > definitely
    > > replace them. What the heck? You have the freewheel off, so no big
    deal.
    > > Takes 5 mins and it's definitely worth the trouble...oh, and stick a
    > plastic
    > > spoke protector in there when you re-assemble!! ;-) This is sure to generate loads of posts
    > > about the uselessness of a spoke protector on a well-tuned bike, but I still think they're a
    > > great thing for $1.
    > >
    > > Cheers,
    > >
    > > Scott..
    >
    > Until they snap, catch under the chain and direct the chain INTO the
    spokes.
    > And yes, it happened to me, I have no idea how it managed to do it so damn well though ;)

    Or, just break, and flop around making a racket, like mine did when I was 40 miles from home. I
    removed it a couple of years ago, and have never had any more trouble from it.

    >
    > Jon Bond
     
  6. John Albergo

    John Albergo Guest

    Dan Daniel wrote:

    >I recently took off the freewheel from a wheel that someone gave me a year ago. A 'Wheelsmith'
    >wheel, Mavic MA40 rim, 36h, Specialized hub, non-butted spokes. Nothing special, just needed
    >something for a 6 speed.
    >
    >I saw that some of the spokes on the freewheel side had some bends about 1-1/2 inch from the
    >hub. Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner, not
    >me). A subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it looks
    >as if the spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are about 2mm
    >long, or less.
    >
    >Other than that, the wheel is fine for what it is. True, spins, and holds my tire and freewheel
    >where I need them to be. I am not a racer, and this bike is used mainly for day trips at a
    >medium pace.
    >
    >Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded
    >touring, could this push them into failure?
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >
    "A subtle but rather sharp bend"?

    Anyway, if it were me I'd replace the spokes to save headaches down the road. They're susceptible to
    fail eventually, though eventually could be a long time. I wouldn't say it's a significant danger.
    On a 36H wheel you can easily continue riding with a broken spoke -- that's one of the advantages of
    high spoke-count wheels. Just wrap the broken spoke around another to keep it from sticking out.
    until you get home and open the brake prevent rubbing. The decision is whether you want to replace
    them all at once at your convenience or one at a time as they break.
     
  7. Stu

    Stu Guest

    >Or, just break, and flop around making a racket, like mine did when I was
    40
    >miles from home. I removed it a couple of years ago, and have never had
    any
    >more trouble from it.
    Or, just break, flop around and then jam the freewheel, so that you have to ride home like you are
    on a fixed wheel
     
  8. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sat, 17 May 2003 21:06:08 GMT, John Albergo <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >"A subtle but rather sharp bend"?
    >

    What I meant is that the bend is sharp, a clean angle, almost like two lines intersecting. Not a
    smooth arc. The bend has, say, an arc of a radius of 1/2 inch, not an arc of a radius of 10 inches.

    By subtle, I meant that the actual bend is small, 1 or 2 degrees most likely.

    >Anyway, if it were me I'd replace the spokes to save headaches down the road. They're susceptible
    >to fail eventually, though eventually could be a long time. I wouldn't say it's a significant
    >danger. On a 36H wheel you can easily continue riding with a broken spoke -- that's one of the
    >advantages of high spoke-count wheels. Just wrap the broken spoke around another to keep it from
    >sticking out. until you get home and open the brake prevent rubbing. The decision is whether you
    >want to replace them all at once at your convenience or one at a time as they break.

    Thanks. I'll follow yours and others' advice and relace the drive side.
     
  9. On Sat, 17 May 2003 14:16:56 +0000, S. Anderson wrote:

    >> Are these spokes a danger? Will they eventually break? If I was to use this bike for loaded
    >> touring, could this push them into failure?
    >>
    They will eventually break, probably. Hard to know when. It would be good insurance to replace them.

    > For the $10 it'll take to fix it ($2 if you do it yourself..) I'd definitely replace them. What
    > the heck? You have the freewheel off, so no big deal. Takes 5 mins and it's definitely worth the
    > trouble...\

    Well, depending on how many spokes it may take more than $2 ($20 for a full wheel, more or less),
    and certainly more than 5 minutes. Replacing just a few spokes is a headache, since you have to
    weave them in and out of the existing spokes to get them laced properly.

    > oh, and stick a plastic spoke protector in there when you re-assemble!! ;-) This is sure to
    > generate loads of posts about the uselessness of a spoke protector on a well-tuned bike, but I
    > still think they're a great thing for $1.

    This is one of those posts. I've never seen the need for the protector. Adjust the limit screw,
    which doesn't even set you back that extra buck.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster. --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  10. It's not necessary to replace such spokes according to Jobst Brandt and I've done what he says and
    I've had no problem. Take the obvious bend out of them and then stress relieve them. Read the net
    about that.
     
  11. Dan-<< Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes >><BR><BR> << If I was
    to use this bike for loaded touring, could this push them into failure?

    If I were to go touring with this wheel, I would change the spokes-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. "This is sure to generate loads of posts about the uselessness of a spoke protector on a well-tuned
    bike, but I still think they're a great thing for $1.

    Cheers, Scott.."

    Here's one. Can they be mounted behind a cassette? Not that I need one, I haven't buried a chain in
    decades, just curious.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  13. "If I were to go touring with this wheel, I would change the spokes-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene" "

    Most definitely. If they do break, you know they wil conspire to do so in the worst possible
    location. Especially if you're on a packed tour. This is not sarcasm.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  14. Dan Daniel wrote:

    > I saw that some of the spokes on the freewheel side had some bends about 1-1/2 inch from the hub.
    > Looks like the chain ended up jammed between the freewheel and spokes (previous owner, not me). A
    > subtle but rather sharp bend. Maybe 1-2 degrees, with small bumps of metal where it looks as if
    > the spoke had the surface metal pushed and scraped. The actual scrape marks are about 2mm long,
    > or less.

    A couple of years ago I had a wheel get damaged like that, from a jammed chain. A few spokes broke
    when it happened, and a few more were just damaged as you described. Initially I replaced only the
    broken ones and re-trued the wheel. The damaged ones started breaking in short order after that. I
    would definitely replace them.

    --
    Toby Hamilton ([email protected])
     
  15. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Here's one. Can they be mounted behind a cassette? Not that I need one, I haven't buried a chain
    > in decades, just curious.
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
    >

    Oh yeah. They're quite common on new bikes today for sure. They're not perfect (they can crack and
    discolour) but I had mine on my last MTB for 6 years, no problems. I never needed it, but you never
    know. I think the benefits outweight the downside, but that's just my opinion. I know people who
    have not used them for 6 years and never had a problem either.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  16. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >The damaged ones started breaking in short order after that. I would definitely replace them.

    I had a similar experience, only nothing broke at first.

    But some time after the chain crash, spokes started breaking at the damaged area.

    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  17. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "stu" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>Or, just break, and flop around making a racket, like mine did when I was
    >40
    >>miles from home. I removed it a couple of years ago, and have never had
    >any
    >>more trouble from it.
    >Or, just break, flop around and then jam the freewheel, so that you have to ride home like you are
    >on a fixed wheel

    This happened to me during one of the night laps at the 24 hour race I did recently. I had
    overshifted the chain into the spokes, and the chain did some serious damage to the spokes. The
    first one that popped gummed up my freewheel (causing the chain to spool out on top of the
    chainstay, and making it a crap shoot as to what - if any - gear I'd be in when I started pedaling
    again). Then it was a domino effect - one drive side spoke after the other popped, and I (barely)
    finished the lap with SIX broken spokes. I had to do so with the rear brake disconnected - not the
    way to ride that course, BTW...

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
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