bents n' wedgies (longish)

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by The Shinefelds, Oct 20, 2003.

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  1. Over the last two years there have been posts too numerous to count that discussed, maybe even
    celebrated the animus between recumbent and upright riders. I guess buttholes will be buttholes,
    regardless of what brand bike they ride. It is my impression that things are different in the
    Greater Philadelphia area where we seem to co-exist peacefully. Except for relatively few lycra-clad
    STA's who don't seem to like anybody. But I digress.

    In the last 4 weeks, I've ridden my VRex in 3 locally organized rides where my experiences as a
    bicyclist who happens to ride a recumbent were superb. The MS 150, organized by the National MS
    Society. The Covered Bridges ride, hosted by the Central Bucks County Bicycling Club. And last
    Saturday night, the Tour de Twilight, organized by the Bicycling Coalition of Greater Philadelphia.
    About 20 riders showed up. Bikes included 2 VRex-i, a Bike E (the ride leader's) and a Barcroft
    tandem as well as a wide assortment of uprights. The entire ride was a marvelous experience. We
    started out at
    7:30 pm (lights and helmets mandatory) on the U of P Campus, through bike friendly center city Phila
    and into Fairmount Park. We split into a couple of groups according to interest and fitness with a
    designated sweeper to make sure nobody got separated, rounding up at a local youth hostel for hot
    cider and snacks.

    Is the cycling community really that fragmented in the rest of the country? There are many cycling
    groups in the Philadelphia area and each caters to unique interests, from the politically active
    Coalition to the fledgling recumbent group that includes a fair number of upright riders, because
    that is who chose to ride with. Locally at least, we seem to get along pretty well. So, it seems
    that cycling communities are what we choose to make them, by either our voice or silent ascent.

    Long or short, fast or slow, if it is on a bike it is all good.

    Jon Shinefeld Philadelphia, PA VRex
     
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  2. Derek

    Derek Guest

    This goes to flock behavior again. Generally, anti-recumbentism is directly related to the degree
    that a group of cyclists relies on drafting or pacelining. Recumbents are viewed as moochers that do
    not meaningfully contribute a fair share to the group because they are not perceived to be
    acceptable anywhere but leeching onto the back on the line and out of rotations. So bent riders are
    shunned. Of course there are exceptions, and I have had team level riders take my wheel at over
    30mph to bridge a gap on a downhill stretch because nobody else was traveling that fast, but it's a
    rare thing.

    There is also the coolness factor. Many cyclists like feeling they are a part of an elite athletic
    group that conforms to a certain style. I have seen an otherwise very fit upright rider shunned by a
    lycra-clad group because he rode an older style bike that had brake cables looping over the
    handlebars. They ridiculed him behind his back and called him "The Cable Guy". I am sure they had
    far more choice terms for me riding my bent.

    "The Shinefelds" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Over the last two years there have been posts too numerous to count that discussed, maybe even
    > celebrated the animus between recumbent and upright riders. I guess buttholes will be buttholes,
    > regardless of what brand
    bike
    > they ride. It is my impression that things are different in the Greater Philadelphia area where we
    > seem to co-exist peacefully. Except for relatively few lycra-clad STA's who don't seem to like
    > anybody. But I digress.
    >
    > In the last 4 weeks, I've ridden my VRex in 3 locally organized rides
    where
    > my experiences as a bicyclist who happens to ride a recumbent were superb. The MS 150, organized
    > by the National MS Society. The Covered Bridges
    ride,
    > hosted by the Central Bucks County Bicycling Club. And last Saturday
    night,
    > the Tour de Twilight, organized by the Bicycling Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. About 20
    > riders showed up. Bikes included 2 VRex-i, a Bike
    E
    > (the ride leader's) and a Barcroft tandem as well as a wide assortment of uprights. The entire
    > ride was a marvelous experience. We started out at
    > 7:30 pm (lights and helmets mandatory) on the U of P Campus, through bike friendly center city
    > Phila and into Fairmount Park. We split into a
    couple
    > of groups according to interest and fitness with a designated sweeper to make sure nobody got
    > separated, rounding up at a local youth hostel for
    hot
    > cider and snacks.
    >
    > Is the cycling community really that fragmented in the rest of the
    country?
    > There are many cycling groups in the Philadelphia area and each caters to unique interests, from
    > the politically active Coalition to the fledgling recumbent group that includes a fair number of
    > upright riders, because
    that
    > is who chose to ride with. Locally at least, we seem to get along pretty well. So, it seems that
    > cycling communities are what we choose to make them, by either our voice or silent ascent.
    >
    > Long or short, fast or slow, if it is on a bike it is all good.
    >
    > Jon Shinefeld Philadelphia, PA VRex
     
  3. Doug Thomas

    Doug Thomas Guest

    "The Shinefelds" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Over the last two years there have been posts too numerous to count that discussed, maybe even
    > celebrated the animus between recumbent and upright riders. I guess buttholes will be buttholes,
    > regardless of what brand
    bike
    > they ride. It is my impression that things are different in the Greater Philadelphia area where we
    > seem to co-exist peacefully. Except for relatively few lycra-clad STA's who don't seem to like
    > anybody. But I digress.
    >
    > In the last 4 weeks, I've ridden my VRex in 3 locally organized rides
    where
    > my experiences as a bicyclist who happens to ride a recumbent were superb. The MS 150, organized
    > by the National MS Society. The Covered Bridges
    ride,
    > hosted by the Central Bucks County Bicycling Club. And last Saturday
    night,
    > the Tour de Twilight, organized by the Bicycling Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. About 20
    > riders showed up. Bikes included 2 VRex-i, a Bike
    E
    > (the ride leader's) and a Barcroft tandem as well as a wide assortment of uprights. The entire
    > ride was a marvelous experience. We started out at
    > 7:30 pm (lights and helmets mandatory) on the U of P Campus, through bike friendly center city
    > Phila and into Fairmount Park. We split into a
    couple
    > of groups according to interest and fitness with a designated sweeper to make sure nobody got
    > separated, rounding up at a local youth hostel for
    hot
    > cider and snacks.
    >
    > Is the cycling community really that fragmented in the rest of the
    country?
    > There are many cycling groups in the Philadelphia area and each caters to unique interests, from
    > the politically active Coalition to the fledgling recumbent group that includes a fair number of
    > upright riders, because
    that
    > is who chose to ride with. Locally at least, we seem to get along pretty well. So, it seems that
    > cycling communities are what we choose to make them, by either our voice or silent ascent.
    >
    > Long or short, fast or slow, if it is on a bike it is all good.
    >
    > Jon Shinefeld Philadelphia, PA VRex

    In our cycling club the Niagara Free Wheelers - we have both regular bikes and recumbents. My wife
    wife and I being Dinks (double income no kids) have both racing bikes and recumbents. We have a
    large enjoyable group which rides three to five days per week, and recumbents and other bikes get
    along quite well, thank you very much.

    Doug Thomas
     
  4. Bill Anton

    Bill Anton Guest

    Here in Lubbock we have the West Texas Cycling Association (WTCA) which is two clubs in one: the
    Lubbock Bicycle Club (touring) and the Chaparral Cycling Club (racing). On most club rides we're all
    together and recumbents (there's only 2 or 3 of us) are welcome. It's only on time trials where the
    USCF rules exlude those of us with an "unfair advantage." At least on the Saturday morning rides I
    haven't found there to be much bent-wedgie animosity. In fact, since moving up to a dual-26
    configuration, the wedgie riders can actually get a fairly decent draft behind me (and my back is
    all they mostly see). A few weeks ago, in fact, it was quite cold one Saturday morning at sunrise
    and the wedgie riders were most appreciative that I "pulled" them the first 15 miles with my fairing
    breaking the cold morning air for them.

    If you find you're not getting any respect from the Lycra-clad roadies, try this: (1) use a heart
    rate monitor and get yourself into tip-top cycling shape, (2) find a roadie pace line, (3) blow them
    away, and then (4) toy with them a little, entending out a little, then letting them catch up before
    doing it again. This will get you respect, and probably some resentment too, but at least you'll be
    helping to dispel the myth that all recumbent riders are slow and over-the-hill. If you want to rub
    it in, at the end of the ride you can start whining about how your butt hurts from sitting in the
    "recliner" too long.

    But so far none of this antisocial behavior has been necessary for me. I slow down enough that the
    pace line can keep up with me 'cause I'm just a nice guy.

    Bill Anton 2001 Vision R-40 26x26 SWB OSS Lubbock, TX, USA

    "The Shinefelds" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Over the last two years there have been posts too numerous to count that discussed, maybe even
    > celebrated the animus between recumbent and upright riders. I guess buttholes will be buttholes,
    > regardless of what brand
    bike
    > they ride. It is my impression that things are different in the Greater Philadelphia area where we
    > seem to co-exist peacefully. Except for relatively few lycra-clad STA's who don't seem to like
    > anybody. But I digress.
    >
    > In the last 4 weeks, I've ridden my VRex in 3 locally organized rides
    where
    > my experiences as a bicyclist who happens to ride a recumbent were superb. The MS 150, organized
    > by the National MS Society. The Covered Bridges
    ride,
    > hosted by the Central Bucks County Bicycling Club. And last Saturday
    night,
    > the Tour de Twilight, organized by the Bicycling Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. About 20
    > riders showed up. Bikes included 2 VRex-i, a Bike
    E
    > (the ride leader's) and a Barcroft tandem as well as a wide assortment of uprights. The entire
    > ride was a marvelous experience. We started out at
    > 7:30 pm (lights and helmets mandatory) on the U of P Campus, through bike friendly center city
    > Phila and into Fairmount Park. We split into a
    couple
    > of groups according to interest and fitness with a designated sweeper to make sure nobody got
    > separated, rounding up at a local youth hostel for
    hot
    > cider and snacks.
    >
    > Is the cycling community really that fragmented in the rest of the
    country?
    > There are many cycling groups in the Philadelphia area and each caters to unique interests, from
    > the politically active Coalition to the fledgling recumbent group that includes a fair number of
    > upright riders, because
    that
    > is who chose to ride with. Locally at least, we seem to get along pretty well. So, it seems that
    > cycling communities are what we choose to make them, by either our voice or silent ascent.
    >
    > Long or short, fast or slow, if it is on a bike it is all good.
    >
    > Jon Shinefeld Philadelphia, PA VRex
     
  5. Sticker Jim

    Sticker Jim Guest

    > In our cycling club the Niagara Free Wheelers - we have both regular bikes and recumbents. My wife
    > wife and I being Dinks (double income no kids)
    have
    > both racing bikes and recumbents. We have a large enjoyable group which rides three to five days
    > per week, and recumbents and other bikes get
    along
    > quite well, thank you very much.

    "Dinks" LOL! That's awesome! :) A guess my wife and I would be "silks" (single income lotsa kids)
     
  6. "Sticker Jim" <[email protected].com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > In our cycling club the Niagara Free Wheelers - we have both regular bikes and recumbents. My
    > > wife wife and I being Dinks (double income no kids)
    > have
    > > both racing bikes and recumbents. We have a large enjoyable group which rides three to five days
    > > per week, and recumbents and other bikes get
    > along
    > > quite well, thank you very much.
    >
    >
    > "Dinks" LOL! That's awesome! :) A guess my wife and I would be "silks" (single income lotsa kids)

    and people wonder how a retired recycle bicycle shop owner can get a fleet of any recumbent he
    wants. Single -Retired - uh ..... SR.....back to the 'bent; easier to figure out!

    Chris Jordan
     
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