"Berry, berry good"

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mike, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

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  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Mike wrote:
    > Berry, berry good Life: Growing a strawberry patch is one
    > of the simplest options for a home gardener. The fruit
    > requires a small investment and produces a hearty summer
    > crop. http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040309-100157-
    > 7963r.htm

    Yeah, but then the birds eat them all. Oh well, that's
    not so bad!

    Jill
     
  3. On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 13:37:17 -0600, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Mike wrote:
    >> Berry, berry good Life: Growing a strawberry patch is one
    >> of the simplest options for a home gardener. The fruit
    >> requires a small investment and produces a hearty summer
    >> crop. http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040309-100157-
    >> 7963r.htm
    >
    > Yeah, but then the birds eat them all. Oh well, that's
    > not so bad!

    It's not that hard to take steps and protect the
    plants. Bird netting is a common solution to protect
    berries, and you can buy it by the roll. I've also
    seen some gardens with wooden frames and screened
    tops hinged on to keep off wildlife.

    We'd like to put in a strawberry patch ourselves
    someday, not sure where I'd put it, though. The
    reward of homegrown strawberries is a huge
    temptation, considering what local prices are.

    Ariane
     
  4. On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 13:37:17 -0600, "jmcquown"
    <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so they looked like
    this:

    >Mike wrote:
    >> Berry, berry good Life: Growing a strawberry patch is one
    >> of the simplest options for a home gardener. The fruit
    >> requires a small investment and produces a hearty summer
    >> crop. http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040309-100157-
    >> 7963r.htm
    >
    >Yeah, but then the birds eat them all. Oh well, that's
    >not so bad!
    >
    Yahbut, it's not always the birds that get them. For years
    I planted strawberries wherever we were transferred
    (corporate America) and was pretty lucky with the crops.
    Had a fake snake in the patch, which seemed to work pretty
    well, until we got to Memphis. About the time I was ready
    to pick the ripest, they'd go missing. Day after day.
    Damned birds, I figured.

    Then one morning, I look out the window toward the
    strawberry patch and there's my 8 year old daughter in her
    nightgown, pickin' strawberries like mad. Biggest durned
    bird in the flock :-D

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    good dinner." Anonymous.

    To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  5. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Ariane Jenkins wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 13:37:17 -0600, jmcquown
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Mike wrote:
    >>> Berry, berry good Life: Growing a strawberry patch is
    >>> one of the simplest options for a home gardener. The
    >>> fruit requires a small investment and produces a hearty
    >>> summer crop. http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040309-100157-
    >>> 7963r.htm
    >>
    >> Yeah, but then the birds eat them all. Oh well, that's
    >> not so bad!
    >
    > It's not that hard to take steps and protect the plants.
    > Bird netting is a common solution to protect berries, and
    > you can buy it by the roll. I've also seen some gardens
    > with wooden frames and screened tops hinged on to keep off
    > wildlife.
    >
    > We'd like to put in a strawberry patch ourselves someday,
    > not sure where I'd put it, though. The reward of homegrown
    > strawberries is a huge temptation, considering what local
    > prices are.
    >
    > Ariane

    My mom grew them in this really useless (for other things)
    patch next to the walkway leading from the driveway to the
    back. They got the morning sun and the space was only about
    3ft by 8ft. So she planted strawberries as ground cover and
    they filled the bed with lovely little red strawberries.
    IIRC none of them got as big as the ones you see at the
    market. The ones we did get to eat were nicely sweet. She
    didn't try to keep the birds away, though. The birds also
    ate the berries off the pyracantha she had growing up the
    wall of the house right there, too. That's a lovely
    climbing plant.

    Jill
     
  6. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 13:37:17 -0600, "jmcquown"
    > <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so they
    > looked like this:
    >
    >> Mike wrote:
    >>> Berry, berry good Life: Growing a strawberry patch is
    >>> one of the simplest options for a home gardener. The
    >>> fruit requires a small investment and produces a hearty
    >>> summer crop. http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040309-100157-
    >>> 7963r.htm
    >>
    >> Yeah, but then the birds eat them all. Oh well, that's
    >> not so bad!
    >>
    > Yahbut, it's not always the birds that get them. For years
    > I planted strawberries wherever we were transferred
    > (corporate America) and was pretty lucky with the crops.
    > Had a fake snake in the patch, which seemed to work pretty
    > well, until we got to Memphis.
    (snip)
    > and there's my 8 year old daughter in her nightgown,
    > pickin' strawberries like mad. Biggest durned bird in the
    > flock :-D
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    Terry, if you are still in the Memphis area we need to have
    lunch one day and talk trash about everyone and the food and
    the servers and everything else!

    Jill
     
  7. On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 00:47:58 -0600, "jmcquown"
    <[email protected]> arranged random neurons, so they looked like
    this:

    >Terry, if you are still in the Memphis area we need to have
    >lunch one day and talk trash about everyone and the food
    >and the servers and everything else!
    >
    I'm in southern California now, but we can still talk trash
    about everyone ;-)

    If you ever run into a lawyer downtown by the name of Henry
    Klein, tell him Terry Schiele (as it was then) says, "Hey!"
    and that it was largely his influence that sent me to law
    school to get my paralegal certificate, so it's on his head
    that I've worked for lawyers yea these many years!

    And, Jill, we have a Sandy Eggo cookin coming up in June -
    we can talk trash about all sorts of RFCers among Those Who
    Know! So, make your reservations and get on out here!

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    good dinner." Anonymous.

    To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  8. Paula

    Paula Guest

    Have you thought of using a strawberry planter.It is a large
    terracotto pot with holes in the sides where the plants are
    put, some people use these for small plants too. They come
    in all sizes some holding up to 30 plants. nice and compact
    and looks pretty too.
     
  9. jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > Mike wrote:
    > > Berry, berry good Life: Growing a strawberry patch is
    > > one of the simplest options for a home gardener. The
    > > fruit requires a small investment and produces a hearty
    > > summer crop. http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040309-100157-
    > > 7963r.htm
    >
    > Yeah, but then the birds eat them all. Oh well, that's
    > not so bad!
    >
    > Jill

    When I had a couple of currant bushes I put netting over
    them when it came close to berry ripening time. I put 4
    tomatoe stakes at the corners of the plot and bought some
    green netting at the fabric store and draped it over the
    whole area and clipped it with clothes pins to hold it in
    place. It worked great and I got all my currants.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead
    already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey
    really *is* what it's all about? mailto:[email protected]
     
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