Best Bent for Bad Back

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Alan Mushnick, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    postion? Alan Mushnick
     
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  2. I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  3. A&B

    A&B Guest

    Alan, You're going to find this is a highly individual thing. For me more reclined is less jarring
    to my lower back, ironically, the same could be said when I used to ride DF's and was bent over in
    the drops. To a certain extent, both defer compression of my lumbar/sacral region. Also, on the DF I
    could get up off the saddle on bad bumps. bill g

    Alan Mushnick wrote:
    >
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  4. Harv

    Harv Guest

    I think a RANS VIVO would be a good choice. RANS seats (at least my V-Rex seat) are back friendly
    and the Vivo's suspension would add considerable cush to your tush. "Alan Mushnick"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  5. A&B

    A&B Guest

    Alan, You're going to find this is a highly individual thing. For me more reclined is less jarring
    to my lower back, ironically, the same could be said when I used to ride DF's and was bent over in
    the drops. To a certain extent, both defer compression of my lumbar/sacral region. Also, on the DF I
    could get up off the saddle on bad bumps. bill g

    Alan Mushnick wrote:
    >
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  6. Harv

    Harv Guest

    I think a RANS VIVO would be a good choice. RANS seats (at least my V-Rex seat) are back friendly
    and the Vivo's suspension would add considerable cush to your tush. "Alan Mushnick"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  7. Mike S

    Mike S Guest

    [email protected] (Alan Mushnick) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick

    The one that comes to mind immediately is the RANS V2. The higher bottom bracket tends to have you
    recline the seat back and the RANS seat can go back a long way. I have a bad back too and find that
    the more laidback I am the less stress there is. My current steed is a Barcroft Virginia GT which is
    designed to be laidback. Before that I rode a RANS V-Rex in a reclined position as well.
     
  8. Mike S

    Mike S Guest

    [email protected] (Alan Mushnick) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick

    The one that comes to mind immediately is the RANS V2. The higher bottom bracket tends to have you
    recline the seat back and the RANS seat can go back a long way. I have a bad back too and find that
    the more laidback I am the less stress there is. My current steed is a Barcroft Virginia GT which is
    designed to be laidback. Before that I rode a RANS V-Rex in a reclined position as well.
     
  9. Alan Weiss

    Alan Weiss Guest

    Alan, I thought you live in NJ. If you're near Philly (I vaguely remember you live south of me, I'm
    in Millburn) you could check out Jay's Pedal Power http://www.jayspedalpower.com/ They have several
    types of recumbents. If you live further north than I think, why not contact NorthEast Recumbents?
    http://www.northeastrecumbents.com/ Johannes Groessbrink is very friendly, knowledgeable, and easy
    to deal with.

    Alan Weiss NJ Gold Rush, E2 tandem, and Leitra rider

    Alan Mushnick wrote:
    >
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  10. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On 16 Jan 2003 16:01:13 -0800, [email protected] (Alan Mushnick) wrote:

    >I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain going
    >down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on the
    >upper back would be less stress on the lower spine.

    In addition to recline/position, bike suspension is a consideration.

    You want to relieve pressure on the nerve root to relieve leg pain. Road shock transmitted to the
    lower back may make the problem worse by compressing the nerve root. A different body position might
    help, but if you're considering a new bike, I'd make sure to test ride it for several miles over
    rough road conditions.

    I have a L5-S1 HNP diagnosed in '98 when over a two week period, I lost ~75% of muscle control to my
    ankle. The condition was aggravated, if not caused by upright bike riding. Everyone's experiences
    are different, but I got relief from specific exercises designed to migrate the disc off of the
    nerve root. A few sessions on the 'rack' (stretching) may also have helped initially. An
    understanding of the anatomy of the lower back helped, too. No more upright bike riding for me!

    I bought a BikeE AT, and six months after my GP thought I'd need surgery, I was riding 25-30 miles
    without stopping. A little more than a year ago, I bought a Tour Easy. I'm definitely faster on the
    TE than the BikeE, but I miss the suspension sometimes.

    There are probably things you can do to make the Tour Easy easier on your back. I presume you
    have the Koolback seat on your Tour Easy. You might try adding a lumbar 'pillow' fastened to the
    seat back to maintain a curve in your lower back. You can also recline the TE seat over a fairly
    wide range...

    On the other hand, a motion to buy a new bike is always in order! %^)

    Good luck,

    Jon Meinecke
     
  11. Alan Weiss

    Alan Weiss Guest

    Alan, I thought you live in NJ. If you're near Philly (I vaguely remember you live south of me, I'm
    in Millburn) you could check out Jay's Pedal Power http://www.jayspedalpower.com/ They have several
    types of recumbents. If you live further north than I think, why not contact NorthEast Recumbents?
    http://www.northeastrecumbents.com/ Johannes Groessbrink is very friendly, knowledgeable, and easy
    to deal with.

    Alan Weiss NJ Gold Rush, E2 tandem, and Leitra rider

    Alan Mushnick wrote:
    >
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick
     
  12. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On 16 Jan 2003 16:01:13 -0800, [email protected] (Alan Mushnick) wrote:

    >I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain going
    >down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on the
    >upper back would be less stress on the lower spine.

    In addition to recline/position, bike suspension is a consideration.

    You want to relieve pressure on the nerve root to relieve leg pain. Road shock transmitted to the
    lower back may make the problem worse by compressing the nerve root. A different body position might
    help, but if you're considering a new bike, I'd make sure to test ride it for several miles over
    rough road conditions.

    I have a L5-S1 HNP diagnosed in '98 when over a two week period, I lost ~75% of muscle control to my
    ankle. The condition was aggravated, if not caused by upright bike riding. Everyone's experiences
    are different, but I got relief from specific exercises designed to migrate the disc off of the
    nerve root. A few sessions on the 'rack' (stretching) may also have helped initially. An
    understanding of the anatomy of the lower back helped, too. No more upright bike riding for me!

    I bought a BikeE AT, and six months after my GP thought I'd need surgery, I was riding 25-30 miles
    without stopping. A little more than a year ago, I bought a Tour Easy. I'm definitely faster on the
    TE than the BikeE, but I miss the suspension sometimes.

    There are probably things you can do to make the Tour Easy easier on your back. I presume you
    have the Koolback seat on your Tour Easy. You might try adding a lumbar 'pillow' fastened to the
    seat back to maintain a curve in your lower back. You can also recline the TE seat over a fairly
    wide range...

    On the other hand, a motion to buy a new bike is always in order! %^)

    Good luck,

    Jon Meinecke
     
  13. Bill Hole

    Bill Hole Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Alan
    Mushnick) wrote:

    > Are there any LWB bents with a more supine postion? Alan Mushnick

    I also have a bad back (partially crushed L4 vertebra due to close encounter of the automotive
    kind). I am very comfortable on my Rotator Pursuit. The Pursuit is a LWB with a full mesh seat
    supported on the bottom with bungie cords. The bungies and the long wheelbase really soak up the
    shocks, preventing jarring the spine. I've never had recumbent butt on this bike, and only
    occasional back pain.

    The standard Rotator seat is fairly upright. Mine is a custom version that is more laid back. The
    standard seat could be laid back more, but the front of the seat mesh then interferes with your
    thighs. I think this could be alleviated by unlacing the front of the mesh and folding it under.

    The only other LWB I know of with a fairly laid-back seat is the RANS
    V2. I've never ridden one, but would like to give one an extended test ride.

    No LWB will be as laid back as, say, a Strada or a Barcroft. Those bikes have high bottom brackets
    so your riding position isn't too open. The Pursuit and V2 have their BBs slightly above seat
    height, so if you go too reclined your power will drop. I suspect that a LWB with a really high BB
    would be hard to control.

    Bill Hole Rotator Pursuit BikeE E2 1972 Falcon San Remo

    --
    Bill Hole [email protected]
     
  14. Bill Hole

    Bill Hole Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Alan
    Mushnick) wrote:

    > Are there any LWB bents with a more supine postion? Alan Mushnick

    I also have a bad back (partially crushed L4 vertebra due to close encounter of the automotive
    kind). I am very comfortable on my Rotator Pursuit. The Pursuit is a LWB with a full mesh seat
    supported on the bottom with bungie cords. The bungies and the long wheelbase really soak up the
    shocks, preventing jarring the spine. I've never had recumbent butt on this bike, and only
    occasional back pain.

    The standard Rotator seat is fairly upright. Mine is a custom version that is more laid back. The
    standard seat could be laid back more, but the front of the seat mesh then interferes with your
    thighs. I think this could be alleviated by unlacing the front of the mesh and folding it under.

    The only other LWB I know of with a fairly laid-back seat is the RANS
    V2. I've never ridden one, but would like to give one an extended test ride.

    No LWB will be as laid back as, say, a Strada or a Barcroft. Those bikes have high bottom brackets
    so your riding position isn't too open. The Pursuit and V2 have their BBs slightly above seat
    height, so if you go too reclined your power will drop. I suspect that a LWB with a really high BB
    would be hard to control.

    Bill Hole Rotator Pursuit BikeE E2 1972 Falcon San Remo

    --
    Bill Hole [email protected]
     
  15. [email protected] (Alan Mushnick) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick

    Alan:

    Very sorry to hear about your back. I have lived with back problems all my adult life, so I truly
    understand what you are going through. Several years ago I had a discectomy and laminectomy for a
    herniated L4-L5 disc. The surgery resolved an agonizingly painful problem. Nevertheless, I have an
    occasional muscle spasm in my back to remind me that my problems are not all behind me, so to speak.

    Is you disc currently herniated? If so, I would hold off on any changes at all until you have
    resolved the current problem. Give it time to calm down and see if you can get functioning again
    with out pain.

    I have been riding a Tour Easy for about three months. I have my coolback seat slightly reclined
    (the bike shop had to file off the ends of the seatback stays a bit to make it work). The tilt
    really increases the lumbar suppport dramatically.

    I was hoping when I bought it that the TE would resolve my bouts with muscle spasms, but in late
    December I had another episode. I took it very easy for a couple of days, ate lots of Ibuprofen, and
    I was back on the TE in about 8 days.

    So, get well, tilt, and if all else fails go shopping

    Good Luck.
     
  16. I had good luck by putting foam inside my BikeE and Linear seat backs to provide more lumbar
    support. My project utility bike uses a water ski for the seat back. I lean it back and use foam to
    provide the support. It works well and foam on the turned up part of the ski tip acts as a head
    rest. Also the seat back is quick disconnect for travel. I can take the seat back into restaurants
    and movies to make all seats recliners.

    I am tickled with the M5 seat. Those Dutch guys have done some work on seat design. For me it is
    good to lean as far back as possible and have suspension. I didn't do anything to the M5 seat. Dian
    had her seat tilted forward and added extra foam to the upholstery.

    I don't think we (bad back guys) have standard injuries, so we can't all use the same seat.

    For me, laid back with suspension is the best. Laid back is also FAST.
    --
    Bill "Pop Pop" Patterson Retired and riding my Linear and our M5 tandem.
     
  17. [email protected] (Alan Mushnick) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Tour Easy, and a herniated disc. Actually, riding doesn't seem to aggravate the pain
    > going down my leg. I was wondering if a bent with a more supine position, allowing more weight on
    > the upper back would be less stress on the lower spine. Something like a SWB Bachetta.
    > Unfortunately there are no bent shops close to me. Are there any LWB bents with a more supine
    > postion? Alan Mushnick

    Alan:

    Very sorry to hear about your back. I have lived with back problems all my adult life, so I truly
    understand what you are going through. Several years ago I had a discectomy and laminectomy for a
    herniated L4-L5 disc. The surgery resolved an agonizingly painful problem. Nevertheless, I have an
    occasional muscle spasm in my back to remind me that my problems are not all behind me, so to speak.

    Is you disc currently herniated? If so, I would hold off on any changes at all until you have
    resolved the current problem. Give it time to calm down and see if you can get functioning again
    with out pain.

    I have been riding a Tour Easy for about three months. I have my coolback seat slightly reclined
    (the bike shop had to file off the ends of the seatback stays a bit to make it work). The tilt
    really increases the lumbar suppport dramatically.

    I was hoping when I bought it that the TE would resolve my bouts with muscle spasms, but in late
    December I had another episode. I took it very easy for a couple of days, ate lots of Ibuprofen, and
    I was back on the TE in about 8 days.

    So, get well, tilt, and if all else fails go shopping

    Good Luck.
     
  18. I had good luck by putting foam inside my BikeE and Linear seat backs to provide more lumbar
    support. My project utility bike uses a water ski for the seat back. I lean it back and use foam to
    provide the support. It works well and foam on the turned up part of the ski tip acts as a head
    rest. Also the seat back is quick disconnect for travel. I can take the seat back into restaurants
    and movies to make all seats recliners.

    I am tickled with the M5 seat. Those Dutch guys have done some work on seat design. For me it is
    good to lean as far back as possible and have suspension. I didn't do anything to the M5 seat. Dian
    had her seat tilted forward and added extra foam to the upholstery.

    I don't think we (bad back guys) have standard injuries, so we can't all use the same seat.

    For me, laid back with suspension is the best. Laid back is also FAST.
    --
    Bill "Pop Pop" Patterson Retired and riding my Linear and our M5 tandem.
     
  19. Arnold Layne

    Arnold Layne Guest

    "a&b" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Alan, You're going to find this is a highly individual thing. For me more reclined is less jarring
    > to my lower back, ironically, the same could be said when I used to ride DF's and was bent over in
    > the drops. To a certain extent, both defer compression of my lumbar/sacral region. Also, on the DF
    > I could get up off the saddle on bad bumps. bill g

    Yeah, I remember when I used to ride the DF. Even when I could barely walk, I could ride the bike
    all day and would forget all about my back - until it was time to get off.
     
  20. Arnold Layne

    Arnold Layne Guest

    "a&b" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Alan, You're going to find this is a highly individual thing. For me more reclined is less jarring
    > to my lower back, ironically, the same could be said when I used to ride DF's and was bent over in
    > the drops. To a certain extent, both defer compression of my lumbar/sacral region. Also, on the DF
    > I could get up off the saddle on bad bumps. bill g

    Yeah, I remember when I used to ride the DF. Even when I could barely walk, I could ride the bike
    all day and would forget all about my back - until it was time to get off.
     
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