Best bike for commuting



SteveWoll

New Member
Aug 22, 2005
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I use a CRX1 with panniers for my commute and I love it. Just fabulous not to end up with a really sweaty back. And my ride is short, but like a roller coaster. Since I changed to the CRX1 from an Apollo I have found longer (hillier) ways to get to work, just to enjoy the ride!
 

rek

New Member
Aug 31, 2002
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In summertime the answer is easy: rack for sure. (sweaty-skanky-back related reasons like Steve brought up)

Re the front suspension issue, yes it's nice, but I wouldn't call it a deal-breaker. Have you thought of wrapping the handlebars with two layers of handlebar tape? (even if you continue using flat bars, just use handlebar tape instead of grips) That would do a lot to help ease handlebar vibrations and cost a heck of a lot less.

You might find that the cyclocross geometry may be very similar to your current CRX.

My commuter has a Topeak rack that has a special rail in it for a "quick-release" kind of bag that they sell. The bag itself slides on and off really easily, and has expandable little side-bags that are like panniers. It can store a LOT of stuff, the whole thing is very nifty.

The rack: http://www.topeak.com/products/rack_004.html (non-springy kind)

The bag: http://www.topeak.com/products/bag_013.html

They have some other rack and bag options of varying sizes and weights, most (if not all) have the quick-release function.
 

robalert

New Member
Jun 8, 2005
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rek said:
In summertime the answer is easy: rack for sure. (sweaty-skanky-back related reasons like Steve brought up)

Re the front suspension issue, yes it's nice, but I wouldn't call it a deal-breaker. Have you thought of wrapping the handlebars with two layers of handlebar tape? (even if you continue using flat bars, just use handlebar tape instead of grips) That would do a lot to help ease handlebar vibrations and cost a heck of a lot less.

You might find that the cyclocross geometry may be very similar to your current CRX.

My commuter has a Topeak rack that has a special rail in it for a "quick-release" kind of bag that they sell. The bag itself slides on and off really easily, and has expandable little side-bags that are like panniers. It can store a LOT of stuff, the whole thing is very nifty.

The rack: http://www.topeak.com/products/rack_004.html (non-springy kind)

The bag: http://www.topeak.com/products/bag_013.html

They have some other rack and bag options of varying sizes and weights, most (if not all) have the quick-release function.
yeah, thanks for the review on the panniers

i was thinking of the topeak system too.... I have some panniers and plain rack on my apollo at the moment....
 

mjs4300

New Member
Jan 2, 2006
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Like the others have said, it is incredibly subjective. It all depends on personal preference. Some might not agree, but the good old hybrid is doing just fine for me, the Giant Elwood. Changed the handle bars from raised to flat and am loving it. Done 1500+ klm in 3 months. With standard pedals too! The suspension seat post provides me with a great deal of comfort. I had some disc surgury 5 or so years ago so I need to be a little careful. This thing is a great ride and cost less than $400. Having said that my last ride was a Huffy Tundra (Kmart) that did 4500klm on in 1 year. So this is a limo compared to that.

It all depends on what you can or want to spend and what purpose it is for. I find the front suspension pretty good to takes out those harsh jolts from bumps you don't see to well in the dark. It is a heavey bike about 18kg with all the lights and stuff I have on it but I like it and it gets me from a to b with costing a cent in petrol. :) :) :)
 

robalert

New Member
Jun 8, 2005
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mjs4300 said:
Like the others have said, it is incredibly subjective. It all depends on personal preference. Some might not agree, but the good old hybrid is doing just fine for me, the Giant Elwood. Changed the handle bars from raised to flat and am loving it. Done 1500+ klm in 3 months. With standard pedals too! The suspension seat post provides me with a great deal of comfort. I had some disc surgury 5 or so years ago so I need to be a little careful. This thing is a great ride and cost less than $400. Having said that my last ride was a Huffy Tundra (Kmart) that did 4500klm on in 1 year. So this is a limo compared to that.

It all depends on what you can or want to spend and what purpose it is for. I find the front suspension pretty good to takes out those harsh jolts from bumps you don't see to well in the dark. It is a heavey bike about 18kg with all the lights and stuff I have on it but I like it and it gets me from a to b with costing a cent in petrol. :) :) :)
my wife has an Elwood SE collecting dust since she had our baby

it is a very very comfy bike and she loved riding it

relatively speaking, for the parts and price, it isn't heavy

it would be great for a short commute but hill climbing and descending speed is somewhat leisurely...
 

roadbikeman

New Member
Jan 6, 2006
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Just remember - mountain bikes are for mountains and road bikes are for the road.

That should give you a hint!

Happy cycling!
 

artemidorus

New Member
Mar 10, 2004
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roadbikeman said:
Just remember - mountain bikes are for mountains and road bikes are for the road.

That should give you a hint!

Happy cycling!
As a road bike commuter, I disagree. Most commuters would prefer the load-carrying capacity, more upright posture, more comfortable ride and the lower gears of an MTB over a road bike, if they were the only choices. I need my MTB some days.
In any case, and as I've already posted, I think that neither type of bike is the ideal.
 

robalert

New Member
Jun 8, 2005
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roadbikeman said:
Just remember - mountain bikes are for mountains and road bikes are for the road.

That should give you a hint!

Happy cycling!
so what are flat bar road bikes?

or cannondale bad boy?

road or mtb... there are bikes that blur the categories... maybe i should go with that
 

slaw

New Member
Dec 19, 2004
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roadbikeman said:
Just remember - mountain bikes are for mountains and road bikes are for the road.

That should give you a hint!

Happy cycling!
So Lance should have ridden an MTB up Mt Ventoux, and I should have ridden a road bike across the Gunbarrell Highway?

I commute on an MTB (with slicks, racks and mudgards) mostly cause I prefer MTB riding in general. Sometimes, like this morning, I choose to go on some dirt tracks to work, but even on some rougher roads and cobbles of my off-dirt route, the MTB is more comfortable.

My Hllman 27" wheel touring bike hasn't been used for over 5 years. Must dust it off to remind me what it was like.
 

jur

New Member
Feb 2, 2005
244
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roadbikeman said:
Just remember - mountain bikes are for mountains and road bikes are for the road.

That should give you a hint!

Happy cycling!
I smell a troll...
 

thomas_cho

New Member
Jan 4, 2005
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roadbikeman said:
Just remember - mountain bikes are for mountains and road bikes are for the road.

That should give you a hint!

Happy cycling!
Could you be one of those who purchase large 4WDs .. but never do any off road driving?

There is definitely a place for the hybrids, flat bar roadies ...