Best Eyewear?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Thunder9, Aug 4, 2003.

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  1. Ed Ness

    Ed Ness Guest

    [email protected] (Thunder9) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 8 Aug 2003 18:41:55 -0700, [email protected] (Ed Ness) wrote:
    >
    > >[email protected] (Thunder9) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >> I'm in the market to buy some eyewear for cycling - both road and mtb.
    > >>
    > >> Could you give me some advice on partiuclar brand/style
    > >
    > >
    > >Check out the Bollé ® Vigilante's. Performance and Nashbar sell these for about $40 these days
    > >and they come with two different sets of lenses. I bought a second pair since the first pair work
    > >so well. About 90% of the function of the Oakleys without all the broken frames and high cost.
    > >
    > >http://www.performancebike.com/shop/Profile.cfm?SKU=16533
    > >
    > >Truely a no brainer in my opinion.
    >
    > But a pair of shades is so subjective in how well they fit. What do you do? Buy a pair just to see
    > if it works, and then send it back if it doesn't?
    >
    > Regards, Thunder9

    Unless you have a strange head shape, the Bolle's should fit you just fine. If they don't, just send
    them back. Performance is very good about accepting returns - assuming they haven't be used much. As
    for myself, I've never had much of a fit problem with the various glasses I've purchased. Also, the
    Bolle's in question have adjustable (i.e. bendable) arms, so fine tuning the fit should be possible.

    Ed
     


  2. Thanks to all here for the good tips regarding Uvex shades. I found some Uvexes on sale for $10 at
    www.campmor.com.

    Didn't care for the Pola-Switch, though.

    Doug
     
  3. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    So what happens in the Tour de France when a rider has to pee? Does he stop?

    Ted Bennett wrote:

    > Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > > They claim it's your answer to a number of things, including: "Unidentified pace-line
    > > > excretions"
    >
    > > Huh? I've never ridden in a pace-line...what are people excreting? Maybe they should have done
    > > that _before_ the ride.
    >
    > Piss. Some people drink enough that they need to pee, and are in too much of a hurry to stop.
    >
    > --
    > Ted Bennett Portland OR
     
  4. Gary Smiley wrote:
    > So what happens in the Tour de France when a rider has to pee? Does he stop?

    Of course not. Just pull one leg of your bikeshorts up and let your dick hang out. Stand up on this
    leg and turn a little to the side so that the wind blows the piss away. Of course you start out by
    moving to the back of the peleton or paceline. Downhill is lots easier than going uphill ;)

    >
    > Ted Bennett wrote:
    >
    >> Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> They claim it's your answer to a number of things, including: "Unidentified pace-line
    >>>> excretions"
    >>
    >>> Huh? I've never ridden in a pace-line...what are people excreting? Maybe they should have done
    >>> that _before_ the ride.
    >>
    >> Piss. Some people drink enough that they need to pee, and are in too much of a hurry to stop.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ted Bennett Portland OR

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  5. patch70

    patch70 New Member

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    Rudy Project do some good glasses that are very comfortable, and have good UV protection. They also come with 3 different coloured lens sets.
     
  6. lincolnr

    lincolnr New Member

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    I own a few pairs of Rudy Projects. I have a pairof casual looking Graals which come with a dark lens, orange lens and clear. These are useful and I'd recommend them for any social rider that doesn't sweat too much. My mainriding glasses ae Tayos, with a Tek Red photochromatic lens which are great. I really like this lens, I use them all of the time, bright, overcast, rain or night time. The Tayos also have a clip to fit my some script lens to them, so I don't need to pay for seperate scripted sunglass lenses.

    I've tried the n Ekynox and they are really comfortable, I'd recommend these hands down for a roadie. The vision off to the sides is fantastic.

    I've also had Oakley M Frame Sweeps and really like the Oakley lenses. However, changing lens and the bulk of Oakleys is a turn off for me.

    - Lincoln
     
  7. Oz Cyclist

    Oz Cyclist Guest

    I wear the Rudy Project 'Graal' for both casual wear and on the bike. Best I've ever used.

    "lincolnr" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > patch70 wrote:
    > > Rudy Project do some good glasses that are very comfortable, and have good UV protection. They
    > > also come with 3 different coloured lens
    sets.
    >
    >
    >
    > I own a few pairs of Rudy Projects. I have a pairof casual looking Graals which come with a dark
    > lens, orange lens and clear. These are useful and I'd recommend them for any social rider that
    > doesn't sweat too much. My mainriding glasses ae Tayos, with a Tek Red photochromatic lens which
    > are great. I really like this lens, I use them all of the time, bright, overcast, rain or night
    > time. The Tayos also have a clip to fit my some script lens to them, so I don't need to pay for
    > seperate scripted sunglass lenses.
    >
    > I've tried the n Ekynox and they are really comfortable, I'd recommend these hands down for a
    > roadie. The vision off to the sides is fantastic.
    >
    > I've also had Oakley M Frame Sweeps and really like the Oakley lenses. However, changing lens and
    > the bulk of Oakleys is a turn off for me.
    >
    > - Lincoln
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  8. > If you like to descend fast, don't use Polaroid glasses. They block valuable information of the
    > road surface, even though they may be good for the eyes. I choose not to wear glasses at all,
    > especially in rain or snow. I have not experienced any of the horrible eye injuries that glasses
    > proponents describe and I have ridden many miles in most every condition. Following a car on a
    > dirt road is one case where I would use goggles as the ancients did in the TdF before Greg Lemond
    > introduced Oakley glasses to the sport. Since I am not racing, I don't follow cars on dirt roads
    > because I don't want to be a dust bunny at the end of the ride.

    Regarding the fact that you feel you don't need eye protection due to "having ridden many miles in
    most every condition" please be honest and let people know that very rarely are *you* in a position
    where you're eating somebody else's dirt when descending. Those behind may be in much greater need
    of eye protection than the person out front.

    Also, I suspect different people have eyes of different sensitivity to dust & dirt particles being
    blown into them. My eyes are probably at the more sensitive end of the scale, but perhaps you'd make
    a case that eyes, like knees, get used to how they're treated early on and adapt?

    Direct injuries aside, my eyes feel much less tired when wearing sunglasses than without, and I
    haven't come across anybody debunking the advantages of protection from UV components.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Mike Jacoubowsky writes:
    >
    > >> I wear Native Nano. Best glasses I have ever had. Polarized lenses, light weight, fit very well
    > >> and never slide no matter how sweaty I get.
    >
    > > Polarized lenses can get you into trouble; my last serious crash was caused by not seeing gravel
    > > on the road because the road was twisty enough, and the reflected light at an appropriate angle
    > > such that the lenses caused drastic shifts in transmitted light, so much so that you could
    > > barely see at times.
    >
    > Ahhh, there are more dangerous effects than what you experienced. Most reflected light from the
    > road is strongly polarized and of reflected light, that from a wet road is one of the most
    > important ones. I was given a pair of polarized glasses to try and the first road on which I tried
    > them was the Giovo mountain pass in south Tirol, just after a morning rain shower... in the woods.
    > By the time I rounded two hairpin turns I knew I couldn't ride with them because there was no way
    > of detecting whether the road was wet or dry. The appearance changed between shade and sunlight
    > and the effects reversed after each 180 hairpin turn.
    >
    > If you like to descend fast, don't use Polaroid glasses. They block valuable information of the
    > road surface, even though they may be good for the eyes. I choose not to wear glasses at all,
    > especially in rain or snow. I have not experienced any of the horrible eye injuries that glasses
    > proponents describe and I have ridden many miles in most every condition. Following a car on a
    > dirt road is one case where I would use goggles as the ancients did in the TdF before Greg Lemond
    > introduced Oakley glasses to the sport. Since I am not racing, I don't follow cars on dirt roads
    > because I don't want to be a dust bunny at the end of the ride.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/a8zs
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
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