Best Forefoot Cushioning

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by John Banks, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. John Banks

    John Banks Guest

    I have used Asics for years; either Nimbus or Kayano - both are fine,
    but I always seem to get a burning sensation under my toes on long runs
    (12+). I should not that I have always had this pain, whether running
    in Nike's, Saucony, etc., always seems to come on in the 10-14 miles
    range.

    I visited a podiatrist thinking I had nueromas - didn't. He gave me
    some metatarsal pads - I tried these, but they were so uncomfortable I
    could never get used to them - I prefered the burning sensation to it.

    I am hoping to find some shoes with better forefront cushioning to help
    delay the on-set of this pain.

    Any suggestions?
     
    Tags:


  2. when you say burning sensation, i am thinking heat generated friction,
    socks, wonder if you run in coolmax socks or the like.

    perhaps you simply need a shoe with a more roomy toe box. keep in mind
    toes/feet swell with distance/heat, etc.

    I don't wear socks (unless it's below 20 degrees). I use baby oil &
    powder to combate heat generated friction. perhaps all this time you
    should be sizing up a 1/2 as well.
     
  3. On 23 Mar 2006 14:26:58 -0800, "John Banks" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I should not that I have always had this pain,
    >any suggestions?


    Learn to spell moron.
     
  4. sammy

    sammy Guest

    John Banks submitted this idea :
    > I have used Asics for years; either Nimbus or Kayano - both are fine,
    > but I always seem to get a burning sensation under my toes on long runs
    > (12+). I should not that I have always had this pain, whether running
    > in Nike's, Saucony, etc., always seems to come on in the 10-14 miles
    > range.
    >
    > I visited a podiatrist thinking I had nueromas - didn't. He gave me
    > some metatarsal pads - I tried these, but they were so uncomfortable I
    > could never get used to them - I prefered the burning sensation to it.
    >
    > I am hoping to find some shoes with better forefront cushioning to help
    > delay the on-set of this pain.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    My personal thoughts on this with seeing your feet is the same as the
    podiatrist. The burning sensations can be caused by numerous things
    including improperly fitted footwear (longitudinal arch lenght of foot
    should match with the shoe, proper width etc.)

    On the metatarsal pad issue, I have seen many diffrent responses to
    varying sizes of pads. If you think you can just put them in and keep
    on with your regular routine, think again. As with the running, you
    also have to allow time for your foot to adjust to the pads. However,
    if they are placed incorrectly (which I have seen abundantly) they can
    create more problems than they solve. They come in many sizes and
    varying shapes given the different foot problems, and when added
    correctly work wonders in correcting problems such as this, and other
    through correcting the biomechanincal difficiencies of the foot.

    As well I also agree with Lance about the hosiery. Proper socks can
    make a world of difference. An acrylic sock such as Thorlo would be my
    first choice. Microscopically the fibres are not as abrasive as cotton
    or other blends and provide superior cushioning and moisture wicking
    ability.

    I'd also suggest perhaps seeking the help of a Board Certified
    Pedorthist as they could be instrumental in giving you further advice
    on footwear best suited for your gait.

    I could talk for hours about this stuff, but hopefully this blurb helps
    you out. I'd be happy to answer any further questions you may have as
    well.

    Sincerely

    Sammy
    Certified Kinesiologist
    B. Sc Kin
     
  5. On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 20:42:58 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >>I should not that I have always had this pain,
    >>any suggestions?


    Hey, are you the guy in the other thread who said eeveryone was
    running wrong
     
  6. John Banks

    John Banks Guest

    >>other thread who said eeveryone<<

    Nope, first post in this group. Looks like you should take your own
    advice and, "learn to spell, asshole."
     
  7. John Banks

    John Banks Guest

    I don't believe socks, sizing, etc., are the cause of the problem - I
    wear coolmax and/or other synthetic fibers, use shoes 0.5-1 full size
    bigger (have been fitted at specialty running stores).

    Perhaps the metatarsal pads were placed incorrectly or the fact that I
    tried to do "too much, too fast." Not sure, but maybe worth another
    try.

    I was told by both the running shop and the podiatrist that I am a
    forefoot striker; so, I was hoping to get shoes that offered the max
    cushioning in that area. Am I in the right shoes now - Asics Nimbus?
     
  8. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "sammy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    Great thorough synopsis. I also thorlo but there are a few good good
    socks like Wigwam and my recent favorite Smartwool.

    -DF

    > My personal thoughts on this with seeing your feet is the same as the
    > podiatrist. The burning sensations can be caused by numerous things
    > including improperly fitted footwear (longitudinal arch lenght of foot
    > should match with the shoe, proper width etc.)
    >
    > On the metatarsal pad issue, I have seen many diffrent responses to
    > varying sizes of pads. If you think you can just put them in and keep
    > on with your regular routine, think again. As with the running, you
    > also have to allow time for your foot to adjust to the pads. However,
    > if they are placed incorrectly (which I have seen abundantly) they can
    > create more problems than they solve. They come in many sizes and
    > varying shapes given the different foot problems, and when added
    > correctly work wonders in correcting problems such as this, and other
    > through correcting the biomechanincal difficiencies of the foot.
    >
    > As well I also agree with Lance about the hosiery. Proper socks can
    > make a world of difference. An acrylic sock such as Thorlo would be
    > my first choice. Microscopically the fibres are not as abrasive as
    > cotton or other blends and provide superior cushioning and moisture
    > wicking ability.
    >
    > I'd also suggest perhaps seeking the help of a Board Certified
    > Pedorthist as they could be instrumental in giving you further advice
    > on footwear best suited for your gait.
    >
    > I could talk for hours about this stuff, but hopefully this blurb
    > helps you out. I'd be happy to answer any further questions you may
    > have as well.
    >
    > Sincerely
    >
    > Sammy
    > Certified Kinesiologist
    > B. Sc Kin
    >
    >
     
  9. On Fri, 24 Mar 2006 12:02:18 GMT, "Doug Freese" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I also thorlo but there are a few good good
    >socks like Wigwam and my recent favorite Smartwool.


    You shoot your goo in them?
     
  10. sammy

    sammy Guest

    John Banks used his keyboard to write :
    > I don't believe socks, sizing, etc., are the cause of the problem - I
    > wear coolmax and/or other synthetic fibers, use shoes 0.5-1 full size
    > bigger (have been fitted at specialty running stores).
    >
    > Perhaps the metatarsal pads were placed incorrectly or the fact that I
    > tried to do "too much, too fast." Not sure, but maybe worth another
    > try.
    >
    > I was told by both the running shop and the podiatrist that I am a
    > forefoot striker; so, I was hoping to get shoes that offered the max
    > cushioning in that area. Am I in the right shoes now - Asics Nimbus?


    Keep in mind that extra cushioning is not always the correct answer. I
    would suggest perhaps replacing your current insoles in your shoes with
    something that has extra cushioning in it before buying new shoes. You
    may have to experiment a bit before you find what is right.

    the fact that you are a supposed forefoot striker (keep in mind people
    with metatarsal problems are often show signs of increased wear on the
    forefoot of the shoe and may not be a true forefoot striker) leads me
    to believe that the pads may be placed incorrectly. It's hard to give
    advice without seeing the problem, but I would perhaps trying placing
    them a slightly different spot. IF you take the insole out of your
    shoe you will see where you strike the hardest. Place the met pad just
    behind that area. Honestly though, if it didn't feel right the first
    time I would have went back to the Podiatrist. They should be able to
    make the adjustment for you. Client satisfaction should be on their
    list priorities (besides taking your money)!

    Hope some of my 2 cents helps

    Sammy
     
  11. Daniel

    Daniel Guest

    On 23 Mar 2006 14:26:58 -0800, "John Banks" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have used Asics for years; either Nimbus or Kayano - both are fine,
    >but I always seem to get a burning sensation under my toes on long runs
    >(12+). I should not that I have always had this pain, whether running
    >in Nike's, Saucony, etc., always seems to come on in the 10-14 miles
    >range.
    >
    >I visited a podiatrist thinking I had nueromas - didn't. He gave me
    >some metatarsal pads - I tried these, but they were so uncomfortable I
    >could never get used to them - I prefered the burning sensation to it.
    >
    >I am hoping to find some shoes with better forefront cushioning to help
    >delay the on-set of this pain.
    >
    >Any suggestions?


    Asics gel Landreths. Hard to find where I am. It's more of an "old
    style" shoe with their "speva" foam construction and minimal
    engineering. Work for me (48 year old slow guy doing around 25 miles
    per week) especially on pavement.

    *But* -- this may sound strange -- have you played around with
    different types of lacing? I used to lace too tight toward the toes
    (squishing left-to-right across the wide part of forefoot) and started
    getting numbness/tingling under the middle toes.

    What "street shoes" do you wear the rest of the day? Maybe they are
    aggravating a problem that you only feel on the long runs. How old
    are you? I spent 20+ years of working life in steel toe boots and it
    took a lot of adaptation when I first started running a few years ago.
    I think my feet changed size and shape once I gave them more room and
    flexibility in my street shoes.

    Good luck!
    --
    Daniel
    [email protected]
     
  12. sammy wrote:
    > Keep in mind that extra cushioning is not always the correct answer.


    OP, this "sammy" seems to have some credentials and experience to know
    what he's talking about. I don't, I just read a lot and have made and
    learned from far more than my share of mistakes. That said, I agree
    that "more cushioning" is often an obvious yet wrong solution to the
    problem.

    Here's another suggestion to add to what you've aready got (I think
    Daniel's ideas are interesting too, FWIW) - if you think your
    discomfort comes from the impact and that more cushioning would help,
    then try running some or all of the distance (12 miles?) on a softer
    surface like grass or a dirt/gravel/sand trail or even a rubberized
    track or treadmill. This will effectively reduce the impact and you'll
    see whether it helps.

    I'd suggest running much of your weekly mileage on a softer surface
    than pavement anyhow, if practical. And if you already are running on
    a soft surface, with the ultra-cushy Nimbus, then it's hard for me to
    imagine you could conceivably require even more cushion.
     
  13. On 24 Mar 2006 11:02:12 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    > this "sammy" seems to have some credentials and experience to know
    >what he's talking about. I don't,


    Hopefully nobody read any further than that.
     
  14. John Banks

    John Banks Guest

    Luckily, most of the time I am in some of my retired running shoes
    (usually about 300 miles old), only wear dress shoes to meetings,
    company functions, etc. 80% of the time I am in running shoes.
     
  15. On 24 Mar 2006 23:56:13 -0800, "Twittering One"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The Nimbae.


    I ran yesterday, but no bang-bang. Where were you guys? I need it,
    bad, or I mean I need it good, but badly. I hope 30 or 40 of you can
    get together and gangbang me. Email me for my schedule. Be sure to
    tell me ahead, because my pussy stinks, and I want to wash it out
    first, and lube my butt.
     
  16. Sir Lancelot

    Sir Lancelot Guest


    >I ran yesterday, but no bang-bang. Where
    >were you guys? I need it, bad, or I mean I
    >need it good, but badly. I hope 30 or 40 of
    >you can get together and gangbang me.
    >Email me for my schedule. Be sure to tell
    >me ahead, because my pussy stinks, and
    >I want to wash it out first, and lube my
    >butt.


    I'm going to be very blunt. Having your pussy pounded by 30 or 40 hot,
    sweaty, horny runners in heat is nothing more than feat accomplishment.
    It bears as much resemblance to real sex as trailrunning does to road
    racing. And that burn you'll feel afterwards won't be lactic burn.

    (Errr......just a rhetorical question...... if a prospective participant
    had a BMI of 29 would that be a problem?)
     
  17. On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 09:33:24 -0500, [email protected] (Sir
    Lancelot) wrote:

    >I'm going to be very blunt. Having your pussy pounded by 30 or 40 hot,
    >sweaty, horny runners in heat is nothing more than feat accomplishment.


    Even by a "Mandingo man" like you Lance? I understand your concern,
    but I figure a few real men will come by and see the line, and join
    in. But all I've had in the last few years has been lesbian sex, and I
    need some REAL sex now to heal my twittering mind.

    >It bears as much resemblance to real sex as trailrunning does to road
    >racing. And that burn you'll feel afterwards won't be lactic burn.
    >


    That's ok, I already have syphillis, my syphilitic ramblings prove
    that.


    >(Errr......just a rhetorical question...... if a prospective participant
    >had a BMI of 29 would that be a problem?)
     
  18. Someone pounced upon my computer
    While I justly slept.

    My consent,
    Unsigned.
    ~ Twittering

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 09:33:24 -0500, [email protected] (Sir
    > Lancelot) wrote:
    >
    > >I'm going to be very blunt. Having your pussy pounded by 30 or 40 hot,
    > >sweaty, horny runners in heat is nothing more than feat accomplishment.

    >
    > Even by a "Mandingo man" like you Lance? I understand your concern,
    > but I figure a few real men will come by and see the line, and join
    > in. But all I've had in the last few years has been lesbian sex, and I
    > need some REAL sex now to heal my twittering mind.
    >
    > >It bears as much resemblance to real sex as trailrunning does to road
    > >racing. And that burn you'll feel afterwards won't be lactic burn.
    > >

    >
    > That's ok, I already have syphillis, my syphilitic ramblings prove
    > that.
    >
    >
    > >(Errr......just a rhetorical question...... if a prospective participant
    > >had a BMI of 29 would that be a problem?)
     
  19. Twittering One wrote:
    > Someone pounced upon my computer
    > While I justly slept.
    >
    > My consent,
    > Unsigned.
    > ~ Twittering


    Identity theft? Hijacking? There is only one ~Twitty.~
     
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