Best light weight compact pump ?



edd

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Jul 8, 2003
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I had the misfortune of getting a flat the other day. I ride with a group, I carry tools so I don't bother with a pump. I borrowed this pump. It was F**king useless, got about 60lb in the tyre after about a gallon of sweat !

simple question really.... What's a good one ?
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Clearly there isn't a best one, but as you mention in your post, there are lots of good ones. I have a good one -- the Topeak Pocket Blaster gets you to at least 100psi. Takes quite a few strokes, but the action is smooth and easy, and the valve-clamp is effective. It's light and fits in a rear jersey pocket (barely).
 

KingB

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Dec 23, 2003
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Originally posted by capwater
I carry a real short one made by Crank Brothers. It has 2 modes; high volume and high pressure. Nice part is it fits easily in the back jersey pocket.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/Profile.cfm?SKU=4394

I have one of these an it works great. I can get 100psi into the tube if I take my time. My only gripe (and this has to do with almost every portable pump made) is there should be a short flexibe tube that attaches to the valve. I have, on more than one occasion, ripped a stem while hastily pumping up hoping to catch up with the group. The short flexible peice should help not place extra strain on the stem, while I furiously pump to get back on the bike.

If you want to repair the flat quick, I suggest a co2 cartridge pump.
 

edd

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Jul 8, 2003
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Originally posted by KingB
I have one of these an it works great. I can get 100psi into the tube if I take my time. My only gripe (and this has to do with almost every portable pump made) is there should be a short flexibe tube that attaches to the valve. I have, on more than one occasion, ripped a stem while hastily pumping up hoping to catch up with the group. The short flexible peice should help not place extra strain on the stem, while I furiously pump to get back on the bike.

If you want to repair the flat quick, I suggest a co2 cartridge pump.

I've borrowed good pumps too. I always pump my tyre up before I fit the wheel back on the bike, placing the rim and valve against my thigh and pumping madly.

I have a floor pump for topping up pressure before I leave the house. It's the only way really, if you want high pressure in your tyres.

Thanks for the posts.
 

BugMan

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Jul 4, 2003
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Forget pumps - they're stoopid.

Get a CO2 unit with an extra cartridge, stick 'em in your saddle bag with a spare tube and a patch kit, and you'll never get stuck.
 

daveornee

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Sep 18, 2003
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Originally posted by edd
I had the misfortune of getting a flat the other day. I ride with a group, I carry tools so I don't bother with a pump. I borrowed this pump. It was F**king useless, got about 60lb in the tyre after about a gallon of sweat !

simple question really.... What's a good one ?

Topeak Road Morph.
Has the flexible tubing, foot rest, and a built in guage. Not the smallest or lightest, but it works reliably and with less effort than any other I have tried.
http://tinyurl.com/223oq
shows you what I am talking about.
 

Randybaker99

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Nov 13, 2003
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Originally posted by BugMan
Forget pumps - they're stoopid.

Get a CO2 unit with an extra cartridge, stick 'em in your saddle bag with a spare tube and a patch kit, and you'll never get stuck.

OK, then what is a good CO2 unit, will any do? Do you use one yourself that you like and would recommend? And what is the deal with all the different sized cartridges? I heard that one of the sizes is readily available and cheap at WalMart, etc. but not sure which one that is.

Thanks!
 

Randybaker99

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Nov 13, 2003
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Originally posted by lokstah
Clearly there isn't a best one, but as you mention in your post, there are lots of good ones. I have a good one -- the Topeak Pocket Blaster gets you to at least 100psi. Takes quite a few strokes, but the action is smooth and easy, and the valve-clamp is effective. It's light and fits in a rear jersey pocket (barely).

Thanks. Do you have the Pocket Blaster, or the Pocket Master Blaster (with the T- handle)?

I would like something even smaller, as my jersey pockets must be a bit smaller than yours, (or maybe I am more picky about having hard objects hanging off my butt!) but probably the only thing smaller is a CO2 unit.
 

daveornee

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Sep 18, 2003
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Originally posted by Randybaker99
OK, then what is a good CO2 unit, will any do? Do you use one yourself that you like and would recommend? And what is the deal with all the different sized cartridges? I heard that one of the sizes is readily available and cheap at WalMart, etc. but not sure which one that is.

Thanks!

I take along a "Genuine Innovations" Ultraflate Pro when I go on tour. I use it as a backup in case my Topeak Morph pump fails.
I test it by helping fellow riders when I am on the road. It uses the cheap threadless CO2 cartridges that are available in places like Walmart. It is very well made and has worked flawlessly when I have used it. It would be suitable for putting in a jersey pocket.
You can take a look at the details at URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2oh86

Most CO2 inflators are "one shot". They simply empty one cartridge per application. Different size cartridges give different inflation pressures for a given tire size.
 

BikeyGuy

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Sep 27, 2003
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I've been using CO2 cartridges for 15 years. They fit in the saddle pack, always work, a no brainer. For me, it's the only way to go.
 

BugMan

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Jul 4, 2003
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Innovations Ultraflate is a good one - fits either Presta or Schrader valves with no adaptors, accepts threaded and non-threaded cartridges (both 12g and 16g), and has a safety lock to prevent accidental discharge. Use 12g cartridges for road tires (inflates a 700x23 to about 90-100 psi) and 16g for mtb tires.

I have the whole shibang strapped on the bottom of my saddle bag, with the tube, patch kit, spare cartridge, and mini-tool all inside (it's a very small bag). I ride different bikes and just switch the bag between them - never have to worry about putting anything in my pockets.