Best Photo of 2006!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by crit PRO, Jan 3, 2006.



  1. Snack

    Snack Guest

    crit PRO wrote:
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/cross.php?id=photos/2006/jan06/petange/4_IMG_8201
    >


    Looks like he's just kissing the pavement to celebrate a victory! ;)
    A victory. In Belgium. On a Bike. Finished ahead of everyone else. 1st
    place. The winner. The guy who crashed over the finish line, and then
    climbed the podium to the top step. Podium. Top Step. Finish. 1st.
    i.e. - Mr. Page is looking foolish with a trophy in hand and stains of
    mud on his jersey, not looking foolish with an obsession driven mouse
    in hand and nothing but jizz stains on his jammies to show for it.
     
  2. Scott

    Scott Guest

    crit PRO wrote:
    > In Luxemburg........


    > That's like a starlet leaving Hollywood and going to Omaha, to get into
    > acting in an easier setting.
    >
    > crit PRO


    Not exactly, but... that's still pretty funny. Showing off for the
    crowd, and then crashing!
     
  3. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Here's a list of your cycling achievements:

    1)
     
  4. Harry

    Harry Guest

  5. RicodJour wrote:
    > If you mean the small country in Europe with the long cycling history,
    > it's Luxembourg. Surprising that someone who had supposedly been there
    > wouldn't know that.


    Yeah, in French, one of the languages spoken there. In German, English and
    Dutch it's Luxemburg.

    --
    E. Dronkert
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote:

    > RicodJour wrote:
    > > If you mean the small country in Europe with the long cycling history,
    > > it's Luxembourg. Surprising that someone who had supposedly been there
    > > wouldn't know that.

    >
    > Yeah, in French, one of the languages spoken there. In German, English and
    > Dutch it's Luxemburg.


    The USA Central Intelligence Agency prefers Luxembourg.

    <http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/lu.html#Govt>

    --
    Michael Press
     
  7. Michael Press wrote:
    >> In German, English and Dutch it's Luxemburg.

    >
    > The USA Central Intelligence Agency prefers Luxembourg.
    > <http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/lu.html#Govt>


    Well apparently so does Collins Concise (British). Huh. I got it from
    Wolters' Dutch-English. Webster's Comprehensive (American) also prefers
    Luxemburg ("Also: Luxembourg"). That's all the English dictionaries I have
    in my library.

    --
    E. Dronkert
     
  8. Michael Press wrote:
    > Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > Yeah, in French, one of the languages spoken there. In German, English and
    > > Dutch it's Luxemburg.

    >
    > The USA Central Intelligence Agency prefers Luxembourg.
    >
    > <http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/lu.html#Govt>


    So that's another argument for "Luxemburg" then.

    On the other hand, the Pentagon's Office of Special Plans
    spells it "Liechtenstein."
     
  9. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Michael Press wrote:
    > > Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > > > Yeah, in French, one of the languages spoken there. In German, English and
    > > > Dutch it's Luxemburg.

    > >
    > > The USA Central Intelligence Agency prefers Luxembourg.
    > >
    > > <http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/lu.html#Govt>

    >
    > So that's another argument for "Luxemburg" then.
    >
    > On the other hand, the Pentagon's Office of Special Plans
    > spells it "Liechtenstein."


    I don't think the OSP ever thought about anything but Iraq.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    The poodle bites, the poodle chews it.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  10. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Michael Press wrote:
    >> Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>> Yeah, in French, one of the languages spoken there. In German,
    >>> English and Dutch it's Luxemburg.

    >>
    >> The USA Central Intelligence Agency prefers Luxembourg.
    >>
    >> <http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/lu.html#Govt>

    >
    > So that's another argument for "Luxemburg" then.
    >
    > On the other hand, the Pentagon's Office of Special Plans
    > spells it "Liechtenstein."


    POTM.
     
  11. Snack

    Snack Guest

    Howard Kveck wrote:

    >
    > But not at all like a starlet that never left Omaha but still talks smack
    > about the ones who did.
    >


    he's ready for his close up....
     
  12. Steven L. Sheffield wrote:
    > Germany, it's known as Letzebuerg ... and the few Dutch speakers there refer
    > to it as Luxemburg.


    No, in German it's Luxemburg as well. Letzeburgisch (no umlaut afaik) is a
    German dialect that a lot of Luxemburgers speak in everyday life. Some
    Deluxeburger may flame me now for calling it a dialect not a language.

    --
    E. Dronkert
     
  13. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    Steven L. Sheffield wrote:
    >> Germany, it's known as Letzebuerg ... and the few Dutch speakers there refer
    >> to it as Luxemburg.


    Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    > No, in German it's Luxemburg as well. Letzeburgisch (no umlaut afaik) is a
    > German dialect that a lot of Luxemburgers speak in everyday life. Some
    > Deluxeburger may flame me now for calling it a dialect not a language.


    Deluxeburgers sounds like something that would be served at a rbr fatty
    masters convention preferably with a dash of panache.
     
  14. On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 18:33:10 +0200, Donald Munro
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Deluxeburgers sounds like something that would be served at a rbr fatty
    >masters convention preferably with a dash of panache.


    Needs home delivery. We hate to have to go out and do all that moving
    about stuff.

    Does panache taste like mayonnaise?

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  15. RicodJour

    RicodJour Guest

    Donald Munro wrote:
    > Steven L. Sheffield wrote:
    > >> Germany, it's known as Letzebuerg ... and the few Dutch speakers there refer
    > >> to it as Luxemburg.

    >
    > Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    > > No, in German it's Luxemburg as well. Letzeburgisch (no umlaut afaik) is a
    > > German dialect that a lot of Luxemburgers speak in everyday life. Some
    > > Deluxeburger may flame me now for calling it a dialect not a language.

    >
    > Deluxeburgers sounds like something that would be served at a rbr fatty
    > masters convention preferably with a dash of panache.


    Almost lunch, and a burger sounds just dandy, maybe a chocolate shake
    and some onion rings. I could use a couple thousand calories for
    lunch. Thanks for the idea. ;)

    R
     
  16. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    Donald Munro wrote:

    >>Deluxeburgers sounds like something that would be served at a rbr fatty
    >>masters convention preferably with a dash of panache.


    Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    > Does panache taste like mayonnaise?


    Only in Belgium.
     
  17. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Curtis L. Russell <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 18:33:10 +0200, Donald Munro
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Deluxeburgers sounds like something that would be served at a rbr fatty
    > >masters convention preferably with a dash of panache.

    >
    > Needs home delivery. We hate to have to go out and do all that moving
    > about stuff.
    >
    > Does panache taste like mayonnaise?


    I think it's in the Hollandaise family, Curtis. Not sure you'd want to put it
    on your order of frites, though.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    The poodle bites, the poodle chews it.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  18. Donald Munro wrote:

    > Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    > > No, in German it's Luxemburg as well. Letzeburgisch (no umlaut afaik) is a
    > > German dialect that a lot of Luxemburgers speak in everyday life. Some
    > > Deluxeburger may flame me now for calling it a dialect not a language.

    >
    > Deluxeburgers sounds like something that would be served at a rbr fatty
    > masters convention preferably with a dash of panache.


    The Deluxeburger is the name a McDonald's in Luxemburg
    uses for what is normally called a Royale with Cheese.
     
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