Best SIMPLE CycleComputer?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bryan K. Walton, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. Hi,
    I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually
    owned one and hope that people in this group can offer advice. Here
    is what I am looking for:

    1) Total Distance
    2) Trip Distance
    3) Current Speed
    4) Large numbers/letters on the readout
    5) Temperature
    6) Works at low temperatures
    7) Would be nice if the buttons were large.
    8) Durable
    9) Energy-efficient (doesn't drain batteries faster than average computer)

    I don't care about cadence, average speed, or wireless.

    Can anybody recommend a certain cyclecomputer for me? Also, any real good webpages out there that
    offer comparison reviews?

    Thanks! Bryan Walton

    --
    ************** remove the "REMOVE" from my email to email **************
     
    Tags:


  2. Bryan K. Walton wrote:

    > I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually owned one and hope that people
    > in this group can offer advice. Here is what I am looking for:
    >
    > 1) Total Distance
    > 2) Trip Distance
    > 3) Current Speed
    > 4) Large numbers/letters on the readout
    > 5) Temperature
    > 6) Works at low temperatures
    > 7) Would be nice if the buttons were large.
    > 8) Durable
    > 9) Energy-efficient (doesn't drain batteries faster than average computer)
    >
    > I don't care about cadence, average speed, or wireless.
    >
    > Can anybody recommend a certain cyclecomputer for me? Also, any real good webpages out there that
    > offer comparison reviews?

    I particularly like the CatEye Mity 8. CatEye electronic doodads are about the most reliable there
    are, very well engineered and built.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/accessories.html#computers

    Sheldon "Oeil De Chat" Brown +--------------------------------------------------+
    | Some of my brother's paintings may be seen at: | http://junila.com |
    +--------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  3. B

    B Guest

    >5) Temperature

    Temperature? B

    (remove clothes to reply)
     
  4. Randy Walton

    Randy Walton Guest

    Can you recommend one with an altimeter?

    RW

    "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Bryan K. Walton wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually owned one and hope that people in
    > > this group can offer advice. Here is what I am looking for:
    > >
    > > 1) Total Distance
    > > 2) Trip Distance
    > > 3) Current Speed
    > > 4) Large numbers/letters on the readout
    > > 5) Temperature
    > > 6) Works at low temperatures
    > > 7) Would be nice if the buttons were large.
    > > 8) Durable
    > > 9) Energy-efficient (doesn't drain batteries faster than average computer)
    > >
    > > I don't care about cadence, average speed, or wireless.
    > >
    > > Can anybody recommend a certain cyclecomputer for me? Also, any real good webpages out there
    > > that offer comparison reviews?
    >
    > I particularly like the CatEye Mity 8. CatEye electronic doodads are about the most reliable there
    > are, very well engineered and built.
    >
    > See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/accessories.html#computers
    >
    > Sheldon "Oeil De Chat" Brown +--------------------------------------------------+
    > | Some of my brother's paintings may be seen at: | http://junila.com |
    > +--------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    > Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    > http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  5. Bruce Frech

    Bruce Frech Guest

    The Cateye doesn't have temp Temp can be useful in the winter as you learn what works to keep
    you comfortable in the nasty weather and how the temp forecasts match what you actually hit on
    the roads..

    Try this one: Planet Bike 9.0.

    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Computer/product_88825.shtml

    "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Bryan K. Walton wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually owned one and hope that people in
    > > this group can offer advice. Here is what I am looking for:
    > >
    > > 1) Total Distance
    > > 2) Trip Distance
    > > 3) Current Speed
    > > 4) Large numbers/letters on the readout
    > > 5) Temperature
    > > 6) Works at low temperatures
    > > 7) Would be nice if the buttons were large.
    > > 8) Durable
    > > 9) Energy-efficient (doesn't drain batteries faster than average computer)
    > >
    > > I don't care about cadence, average speed, or wireless.
    > >
    > > Can anybody recommend a certain cyclecomputer for me? Also, any real good webpages out there
    > > that offer comparison reviews?
    >
    > I particularly like the CatEye Mity 8. CatEye electronic doodads are about the most reliable there
    > are, very well engineered and built.
    >
    > See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/accessories.html#computers
    >
    > Sheldon "Oeil De Chat" Brown +--------------------------------------------------+
    > | Some of my brother's paintings may be seen at: | http://junila.com |
    > +--------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    > Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    > http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  6. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Bryan K. Walton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually owned one and hope that people
    > in this group can offer advice. Here is what I am looking for:
    >
    > 1) Total Distance
    > 2) Trip Distance
    > 3) Current Speed
    > 4) Large numbers/letters on the readout
    > 5) Temperature
    > 6) Works at low temperatures
    > 7) Would be nice if the buttons were large.
    > 8) Durable
    > 9) Energy-efficient (doesn't drain batteries faster than average computer)
    >
    > I don't care about cadence, average speed, or wireless.
    >
    > Can anybody recommend a certain cyclecomputer for me? Also, any real good webpages out there that
    > offer comparison reviews?

    I own this one:

    http://tinyurl.com/2v4wt

    I like it a lot. I bought it because I wanted something simple as well. Has what you're looking for
    except temperature. Seems fairly waterproof, easily removed, and I love the display. The display is
    not they old fashioned LED numbers based around "8" but more "rounded" if you will. Nashbar also
    carries a closeout model that's cheaper:

    http://tinyurl.com/2sdnw

    I've found MTB Reviews to be useful in the past. Here is a direct link to the computer section:

    http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/computer/

    C.Q.C.
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Bryan K. Walton wrote:

    > 5) Temperature

    Very few have Temperature and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a
    computer mounted in the usual position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.

    ~PB
     
  8. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

    Joined:
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    Dear Peter,

    Actually, I think that it's the other way around.

    A steady stream of 20 degree F. air will chill
    a thermometer to 20 degrees F. and nothing
    else. The rider, on the other hand, will feel
    miserably cold because the stream of cold air
    is carrying away far more heat from his body.

    The thermometer quickly moves to the ambient
    temperature of 20 F. and reports it accurately.
    We remain much warmer than the ambient
    temperature, but feel colder according to how
    much cold wind is busy carrying heat away
    from our bodies.

    This is analogous to the way that metal
    will feel colder to the touch than wood.
    Far more heat will flow from a warm hand
    into cold, conductive metal than into cold,
    non-conductive wood.

    Carl Fogel
     
  9. Pete Biggs wrote:

    > Very few [cyclecomputers] have Temperature

    That's correct.

    > and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a computer mounted in the usual
    > position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.

    Actually, wind chill mainly affects damp things. It is caused by evaporation.

    Wind chill also affects things that are warmer than the ambient air, such a human bodies, because it
    draws heat from the hotter object.

    It has no effect on cylclecomputers or on thermometers. Indeed, my Chrysler minivan has a
    thermometer as part of its "motocomputer" system, and it doesn't care how fast I drive.

    Sheldon "It Works" Brown +----------------------------------+
    | What sane person could live in | this world and not be crazy? | --Ursula K. LeGuin |
    +----------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772
    FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  10. Frkrygow

    Frkrygow Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > Bryan K. Walton wrote:
    >
    >
    >>5) Temperature
    >
    >
    > Very few have Temperature and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a
    > computer mounted in the usual position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.

    Not so.

    A thermometer tells you IT'S OWN temperature. If you ride from a 90 degree day into a 60 degree
    tunnel, the thermometer will read high until it's own temperature reaches 60. The relative wind
    simply helps this happen more quickly.

    But that's pretty unimportant in typical use. The short of it is, a moving thermometer will still
    read correctly. A more likely problem is for it to be confused by excessive radiant heat gain
    from the sun.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, omit what's between "at" and "cc"]
     
  11. JeffK

    JeffK Guest

    > Very few have Temperature and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a
    > computer mounted in the usual position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.

    I hear cyclocomputer thermometers are inaccurate. PB mentioned wind cooling. Other people have told
    me the sun's heat causes wacky readings.

    The same folks tell me they like Sigma and Cateye computers for the usual cycling functions.
     
  12. Rosco

    Rosco Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Bryan K. Walton wrote:
    >
    > > 5) Temperature
    >
    > Very few have Temperature and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a
    > computer mounted in the usual position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.
    >
    > ~PB
    >
    >

    Higher end weather stations are designed with baffles to keep the temperature sensor in the shade,
    but they are also fan aspirated to keep the air moving. The moving air on a cycle computer is a good
    thing in this case.
     
  13. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    JeffK wrote:
    >> Very few have Temperature and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a
    >> computer mounted in the usual position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.
    >
    >
    > I hear cyclocomputer thermometers are inaccurate. PB mentioned wind cooling.

    Looks as if I'm wrong about that. (Thanks for the corrections Sheldon and Frank).

    I was thinking that electrical circuitry would make the thermometer probe normally warmer than the
    amibient air, and also that wind cools anything if it's fast enough. The former factor is probably
    too slight to matter, and the latter must be completely wrong or even the wrong way round (if
    ambient temperature is no cooler than the object)!

    > Other people have told me the sun's heat causes wacky readings.

    That's probably true, and in any case, temperatures for weather reporting purposes are usually taken
    in the shade.

    ~PB
     
  14. On 02/26/2004 09:07 PM, in article [email protected], "frkrygow"
    <"frkrygow"@omitcc.ysu.edu> wrote:

    > But that's pretty unimportant in typical use. The short of it is, a moving thermometer will still
    > read correctly. A more likely problem is for it to be confused by excessive radiant heat gain from
    > the sun.

    I can speak to this one ... My Vetta V-100 (in a black case) consistently reads about 10-15 degrees
    hotter than the actual temperature in the summertime, when it's hit by direct sunlight. If I keep
    the sun at my back, so the computer is shadowed, it's relatively accurate.

    Of course, there are days when the ambient temperature is only 95, but it really does feel like 110
    (or more) due to radiant heat coming off the road.

    --
    Steven L. Sheffield stevens at veloworks dot com veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net bellum
    pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea aye tee why you ti
    ay aitch aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you double-yew double-ewe
    dot veloworks dot com [four word] slash
     
  15. W K

    W K Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > JeffK wrote:
    > >> Very few have Temperature and I wouldn't expect a thermometer to give useful readings from a
    > >> computer mounted in the usual position as the whole unit would be greatly chilled by the wind.
    > >
    > >
    > > I hear cyclocomputer thermometers are inaccurate. PB mentioned wind cooling.
    >
    > Looks as if I'm wrong about that. (Thanks for the corrections Sheldon and Frank).

    You would be right if you spat/dribbled sweat on it!

    > I was thinking that electrical circuitry would make the thermometer probe normally warmer than the
    > amibient air, and also that wind cools anything if it's fast enough. The former factor is probably
    > too slight to matter,

    Note: its being powered by what is pretty much a watch battery that lasts for years, thats not going
    to be using much power. OTOH your theory does work when people want it to - there are fluid
    speed detectors that work in the way you describe.
     
  16. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Bryan K. Walton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually owned one and hope that people
    > in this group can offer advice. Here is what I am looking for:
    >
    > 1) Total Distance
    > 2) Trip Distance
    > 3) Current Speed
    > 4) Large numbers/letters on the readout
    > 5) Temperature
    > 6) Works at low temperatures
    > 7) Would be nice if the buttons were large.
    > 8) Durable
    > 9) Energy-efficient (doesn't drain batteries faster than average computer)
    >
    > I don't care about cadence, average speed, or wireless.
    >
    > Can anybody recommend a certain cyclecomputer for me? Also, any real good webpages out there that
    > offer comparison reviews?

    I don't know about "best", but the Cateye Mity 3 works very well, has all the features you want
    (except temp), is very reliable and cheap (~$15 mail-order). I liked the Mity 2 even more, since it
    had fewer features, which made its interface less multiplexed, but I find the dual trip odometer of
    the Mity 3 useful for some events (when I can remember how to use it).

    I used to have a watch with a built-in thermometer. It gave me a very accurate idea of my wrist
    temperature.
     
  17. Bryan-<< I am looking to purchase a cyclecomputer. I've never actually owned one and hope that
    people in this group can offer advice. >><BR><BR>

    cateye Mity 8....great 'puter.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  18. Pete Biggs wrote:

    > I was thinking that electrical circuitry would make the thermometer probe normally warmer than the
    > amibient air, and also that wind cools anything if it's fast enough. The former factor is probably
    > too slight to matter, and the latter must be completely wrong or even the wrong way round (if
    > ambient temperature is no cooler than the object)!

    Right. Wind _heats_ anything if it's fast enough.

    That's why space ships have special heat resistant tiles on the outside.

    Sheldon "Hot Stuff" Brown +-----------------------------------------------+
    | The difference between truth and fiction: | Fiction has to make sense. | --Mark Twain. |
    +-----------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone
    617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  19. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > Wind _heats_ anything if it's fast enough.
    >
    > That's why space ships have special heat resistant tiles on the outside.

    "Fast enough" is the operative phrase. The shuttle is an extreme case, obviously. Wind heating can
    be ignored for just about everything else that's subsonic.

    If the wind is to heat a body, the air speed has to be pretty darn fast, and that wind only heats
    the leading edge of a body. The stagnation pressure of the air has to be high to raise the
    temperature (using the famous PV=nRT equation), and the pressure differences are always minimal for
    low subsonic flow.

    So, even when you're descending that high mountain pass in a tuck, the wind is not heating your
    temperature sensor.

    For those who only believe numbers: At 1 atmosphere, 25 C, the stagnation temperature rise for a
    rider going 50 mph (0.06 Mach) is about 0.2 C. And that is only at the leading edge, everywhere else
    it's zero.

    From a practical standpoint, air speed on a bike serves to cool the sensor and reduce the
    temperature measurement error caused by the Sun.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  20. Someone wrote:

    > wind cools anything if it's fast enough.

    I replied, in part:

    >>Wind _heats_ anything if it's fast enough.
    >>
    >>That's why space ships have special heat resistant tiles on the outside.
    >
    Terry Morse wrote:
    >
    > "Fast enough" is the operative phrase. The shuttle is an extreme case, obviously.

    Yes, obviously.

    Wind heating can be ignored for just about
    > everything else that's subsonic.

    Right, that's why I had previously written:

    >>It has no effect on cylclecomputers or on thermometers.

    > From a practical standpoint, air speed on a bike serves to cool the sensor and reduce the
    > temperature measurement error caused by the Sun.

    That's only true if the cyclecomputer is warmer than the ambient air.

    If the cyclecomputer were colder than the ambient air, wind would help warm it to ambient
    temperature.

    When the cyclecomputer is not in direct sunlight, I would expect it to be at the ambient air
    temperature, where wind would have no practical effect, as I originally said.

    Sheldon "Topic Drift" Brown +-------------------------------------------------+
    | There is something fascinating about science. | One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture |
    | out of such a trifling investment of fact. | --Mark Twain |
    +-------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone
    617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
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