Best Steel Road Bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tom, May 31, 2003.

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  1. Tom

    Tom Guest

    I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.

    I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    range is open.

    Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.

    Tom

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  2. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride. I'm a
    senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my age;
    but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price range is
    open. Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please. Tom

    I own 3 steel road bikes: Croll, Tommasini, Trek. There is no "best", except for the one that fits
    you the best. You have to determine the size and frame geometry that's appropriate for you, perhaps
    with the help of a good bike shop. There are plenty of good custom framebuilders working in steel,
    if you want to go the custom route. That said, if aesthetics are important to you, and you like the
    idea of a traditional lugged Italian frame, the Tommasini Techno is certainly worth considering.
    Colorado Cyclist sells them.
     
  3. Us

    Us Guest

    Waterford? Handbuilt to your measurements in the USA.............. http://www.waterfordbikes.com/ or
    perhaps a Rivendell?

    Mike Krueger wrote:
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride. I'm
    > a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my age;
    > but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price range is
    > open. Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please. Tom
    >
    > I own 3 steel road bikes: Croll, Tommasini, Trek. There is no "best", except for the one that fits
    > you the best. You have to determine the size and frame geometry that's appropriate for you,
    > perhaps with the help of a good bike shop. There are plenty of good custom framebuilders working
    > in steel, if you want to go the custom route. That said, if aesthetics are important to you, and
    > you like the idea of a traditional lugged Italian frame, the Tommasini Techno is certainly worth
    > considering. Colorado Cyclist sells them.
     
  4. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Just a recommendation, given your declarations -

    CYFAC Genius - all frames are to measure, and not very expensive. Can't make much of a mistake that
    way. And the weight of frame and Genius fork is around 1400 grams. Perfectly smooth joints, not with
    raccords (lugs?).

    Other, built up bike I have ridden a bit and like - Lemond 853 pro, available on their Zurich model
    with Ultegra.

    Happy riidng.

    "Mike Krueger" <[email protected]> a √©crit dans l'article
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride. I'm
    > a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my age;
    > but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price range is
    > open. Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please. Tom
    >
    > I own 3 steel road bikes: Croll, Tommasini, Trek. There is no "best",
    except
    > for the one that fits you the best. You have to determine the size and
    frame
    > geometry that's appropriate for you, perhaps with the help of a good bike
    shop.
    > There are plenty of good custom framebuilders working in steel, if you
    want to
    > go the custom route. That said, if aesthetics are important to you, and you like the idea of a
    > traditional lugged Italian frame, the Tommasini Techno is certainly worth considering. Colorado
    > Cyclist sells them.
     
  5. Waterford.

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
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  6. Tom

    Tom Guest

    I was not aware of Waterford; nice web site and obviously good quality. Thanks.

    Tom

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  7. Tc Rider

    Tc Rider Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.
    >
    > Tom

    Fit issues aside, I have a Mondonico Nemo; perfect if you're into traditionally handmade lugged
    steel frames (they even pin the lugs instead of spot weld them) but also quite light. I think their
    current top of the line is made from UltraFoco tubing, and I'm guessing the frame (no fork) will be
    in the 3.5-3.8 pound range. Made in a small Italian town by small Italian men... :cool:

    Plus they will custom build if you're willing to wait a bit.

    TC
     
  8. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    You might take a look at the Serotta CSI. Real lugs, beautiful workmanship, lots of sizes, an
    extended head tube is available if your not quite as flexible as you once were. I've had mine
    for seven years and can't imagine wanting another bike. http://www.serotta.com/pages/Csi.html
    Bill Brannon
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  9. Tom wrote:
    >
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.

    There are many, many choices. I'm surprised no one has mentioned Richard Sachs
    (http://www.richardsachs.com) - all his frames are immediately collectable, that's how good his
    reputation is. Lugged steel is what he does. Located in CT. Richie will ride with you, look at your
    current bikes, listen to what you want, then make all the production decisions about tubing sizes,
    frame angles, etc.

    I had a custom steel bike built for myself by Stephen Bilenky (http://www.bilenky.com) and couldn't
    be happier with it. I got it about 5 years ago and it is truly my dream bike - light (15.5 lbs.
    ready to ride including pedals, thanks to sewups and a few weight-weenie components), fits me like
    nothing else, and I can ride it all day long (I asked for a century type of bike, slightly long
    chainstays for a nice ride). Stephen specializes in fillet-brazed steel although he also does lugs.
    Stephen's main reputation is as a tandem builder but he builds all kinds of bikes, as you'll see
    from his web site. Located in Philly. Stephen will let you be as involved as you want in the minutae
    of tubing selection, frame angles, and the like.

    Brian Baylis is primarily known as a frame painter (he painted my Bilenky) but he builds and I'm
    told he build very well, too. In California.

    Steve "wish my price range was open" Freides http://www.kbnj.com
     
  10. Tom Luttrell

    Tom Luttrell Guest

    Della Santa. Price, waiting time, quality--by far the best steel frame.

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  11. Rkoreis

    Rkoreis Guest

    Antonio and son build a very nice frame, both under their own moniker and for Torrelli. My LBS
    started carrying them shortly after I bought my Waterford. While I have absolutely NO regret
    about buying the Waterford and new bike lust quickly passes each time that I ride it, you can get
    a similar Mondonico for less $. Also, Antonio & son have been coming over here on a regular basis
    to tour the retail outlets with Chairman Bill McGann. If you preorder a frame, You'll get
    measured by the builders. I know several people who get their bikes this way and they all had a
    WOW reaction upon riding their new bikes. A lower priced option is Fuji. At the price point, they
    really can't be beat.

    A key for myself is what gives me the biggest grin. It's an easier decision with motorcycles, but
    also works with bikes. I didn't like the big assed welds on the Lemonds. Trek makes an okay bike,
    but there are lots of them. While I'm sure there are others out there, I have yet to meet up with
    another Hypercanary Yellow Waterford, let alone a 2200. The closest is a guy I know who has a yellow
    Paramount. Almost identical under the paint.

    Don't forget that the bike is only part of the purchase. You should also be buying into the shop. A
    good shop will take care of you long after the sale. Find a shop you like, then buy what they sell.
    Just make sure they sell Campy. Run, fast, from any Shimano only shop.

    Friends don't let friends ride ShimaNO.

    Bob Koreis Tacoma WA

    "TC Rider" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Fit issues aside, I have a Mondonico Nemo; perfect if you're into traditionally handmade lugged
    > steel frames (they even pin the lugs instead of spot weld them) but also quite light. I think
    > their current top of the line is made from UltraFoco tubing, and I'm guessing the frame (no fork)
    > will be in the 3.5-3.8 pound range. Made in a small Italian town by small Italian men... :cool:
    >
    > Plus they will custom build if you're willing to wait a bit.
    >
    > TC
     
  12. T. Field

    T. Field Guest

    CoMotion Stock and custom builds in Steel or Aluminum
     
  13. Tritonrider

    Tritonrider Guest

  14. Dashi Toshii

    Dashi Toshii Guest

  15. In article <[email protected]>, "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.

    In order of preference:

    Richard Sachs Ron Cooper
    J. Peter Weigle Peter Mooney Roland Della Santa

    But primarily Richard Sachs.

    --
    Steven L. Sheffield stevens at veloworks dot com veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net bellum
    pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est
     
  16. tomhob-<< I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty
    of the ride.

    << Not a racer at my age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and
    performs well. Price range is open.

    Custom Nobilette, by Mark Nobilette, hand picked tubesets, full custom, tig welded, fillet brazed or
    lugged. Beautiful, I have owned two Nobilettes and would ride nothing else.

    http://www.nobilettecycles.com

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  17. Crankbreaker

    Crankbreaker Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    > I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    > age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    > range is open.
    >
    > Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.
    >
    > Tom

    Steelman http://www.steelmancycles.com/Bike%20of%20the%20week.html
     
  18. Neacalban1

    Neacalban1 Guest

    I've been quite happy with my 2000 Bianchi Boron XL,with Record stuff. but it just happens to fit me
    well. theres lot of choices,all the names mentioned are great, and the custom option is definitely
    to be considered, if you're even remotely configured outside the average.
     
  19. J Dash Me

    J Dash Me Guest

    >I'm planning on buying a new light weight triple steel road bike, for the beauty of the ride.
    >
    >I'm a senior citizen and ride 125 miles a week in all types of road conditions. Not a racer at my
    >age; but, ride with the younger guys and want a good bike that rides and performs well. Price
    >range is open.
    >
    >Bianchi? Landshark? Your recommendations please.
    >
    >Tom

    Sorry I don't know hoe to do the hyperlink thing. I have had over twenty custom frames made. This
    guy Eric at Groundup does a great job.

    http://www.groundupdesigns.com/

    Jame Carney
     
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