Best Tips for Increasing Average Speeds

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Tri-Dude, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. Tri-Dude

    Tri-Dude New Member

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    Relatively new road rider, been riding for about 6 months. Averaging 16-17 MPH on rides of between 12 to 30 miles, cadence is around 80-90. Ride about every other day, doing around 10-12 miles and then longer 25-30 mile rides on weekends. Also I have lost about 20lbs but still need to lose another 50lbs, so I know I have a long road to go. But I sure am having fun riding.



    I started at around 11 MPH so I am plesed with the progress so far, but it appears that all the easy gains have been made, so where do I go from here.
     
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  2. Iankatz

    Iankatz New Member

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    Just keep riding. Ride faster and get a HRM so you know how hard you're working
     
  3. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    train more.
     
  4. TKOS

    TKOS New Member

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    I find that I can ride a lot faster when I have a partner that is as good or better than I am. Some of it is drafting some phsycological.
     
  5. ganderctr

    ganderctr New Member

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    One thing that helped me last year send my average 20 mile speed from 11-15 miles an hour was a set of short, high-intensity rides. Probably not something to do outdoors right now (my throat and lungs hate the cold) but it's all out for 5-10 miles. I did that for about 3 days in April and the results were apparent the next week (I rested for a few days after the last ride).
     
  6. sooray02

    sooray02 New Member

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    Interval workouts. Yes, it should be your best friend. It hurts but it helps.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Tri-Dude

    Tri-Dude New Member

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    You are all very helpful and I know that more training is the only answer to more speed but: :confused:



    Why do I need a HRM?



    What type of intervals should I be running?



    How often?



    Rest & recovery?



    etc.?



    Oh by the way my max seated sustainable speed on the flat is about 22/23 for around 1-2 miles.
     
  8. Iankatz

    Iankatz New Member

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    To train well you need to know how hard you're working. 140bpm is not the same as 170bpm, but they may feel the same.
     
  9. VeloFlash

    VeloFlash New Member

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    You need to increase your V02max and your anaerobic threshold to increase average speed.

    Intervals -

    V02max = 4-5 minute intervals

    AT = 20-25 minute intervals
     
  10. sparkywowo

    sparkywowo New Member

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    I have been trying to get this figured out and still don't know what is going on.

    I have a good guess of my MHR (185) and AT(170). (170 is where the heavy breathing and fatigue starts in when I ramp up the effort a few bpm every couple of minutes over the course of 20 minutes. Can't get higher than 185-186, I am 40 yrs old.)
    So, for increased AT, I would work out at 160-170 (95-100% of AT) a couple of times a week at 20-25 mins each time. But, I don't know what you are saying about the VO2max intervals. Is it 3,4,5... 5 min intervals (or more) at +105% of AT with what recovery etc... Can I get some more details, Thanks!
     
  11. VeloFlash

    VeloFlash New Member

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    Exercise physiology is an inexact science for the most part.

    I am not qualified but my understanding is that at one time it was believed the best enhancer of pushing up AT levels was to exert yourself within 5 bpm below your AT level. Then it was stated within 10 bpm.

    Again V02 max enhancement is sketchy. It appears to be agreed that intervals should be 3 minutes plus with 4 minutes being the optimum.

    Effort should be such that your reach V02 max at the end of the interval. Another recommendation was to ride at 95% effort throughout. I prefer to ride V02 max intervals on consistent low grade hills at high cadence.

    Recovery time can be 3:1 or as low as 1:1. Here aerobic fitness is the determiner. I would start out at 3:1 and in time as your fitness improves you will be down to 1:1. The downhill return from a hill is helpful here.

    Another exercise where V02 max is substantially improved is the "Tabata Protocol" (Google that). It is a vicious indoor interval where you are ensured of reaching your V02max in 4+ minutes.
     
  12. sparkywowo

    sparkywowo New Member

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    Well, the one issue that comes to mind is, once you are in pretty good shape, and seem to plateau in progress, is it a safe assumption that you have more or less reached your personal (genetic) limit, and you just aren't going to get much faster regardless of how much effort you devote?
     
  13. VeloFlash

    VeloFlash New Member

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    Blame it on our parents, eh?

    We all are genetically limited but we do not have any measuring device to inform us if we have reached that limit. I have read where it will take about 5 years to fully develop the oxygen and fuel pathways to a competitive cyclist's muscles. So that is one constraint.

    Also, training programs can be hit or miss. It is only through change and trial & error over time that we will discover a regime that would be the most beneficial. You will find many riders commenting that their improvements relate to a change of coach.

    You will not hit your genetic limits by training, say, six hours a week. But if you were into full time training you would have to be approaching your limits. Time is one other constraint.
     
  14. sparkywowo

    sparkywowo New Member

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    Aha, after looking this over and reading more, there is hope for me!
    Now, just to keep training without setback due to injury...(which happened routinely when I used to run).
     
  15. Tri-Dude

    Tri-Dude New Member

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    Hey that is so helpful, I think!

    Well I have ordered myself a HRM, and it should be here any day.



    I have been out training, recently and have been taking on some long slow hills. Whilst pushing the cadence to about 95-110.



    It HURTS; you guys sure know how to punish the body. :eek:



    Not sure about the progress yet, but I'll let you know how it goes.

     
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