Best tire for winter (snow) commuting?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave S, Nov 4, 2003.

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  1. Dave S

    Dave S Guest

    I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow. What's the
    largest tire that will fit under my Chorus brakes? Have any suggestions for a 'best' tire combining
    min rolling resistance and max traction?

    Also, have any feedback on Tufo's clincher tubulars?

    And yes, I'd love to get a cross bike but that'll have to wait until next year.

    Thx, Dave
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Dave S <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow. What's the
    >largest tire that will fit under my Chorus brakes?

    This depends on the frame design and width of the rim. I was able to run a Panaracer 700x32 in the
    rear and an Avocet 700x28 in the front with mine.

    > Have any suggestions for a 'best' tire combining min rolling resistance and max traction?

    I think you will not find any appreciable difference in performance in snow among road tires of a
    given size. If you want better then use a mountain bike for your snow riding. A $100 used mountain
    bike could make a great snow commuter.

    http://www.icebike.com/ is a good site to visit for winter riding info.

    --Paul
     
  3. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:0yQpb.38074$A%[email protected]...

    > In article <[email protected]>, Dave S <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow. What's the
    > >largest tire that will fit under my Chorus brakes?
    >
    > This depends on the frame design and width of the rim. I was able to run a Panaracer 700x32 in the
    > rear and an Avocet 700x28 in the front with mine.
    >
    > > Have any suggestions for a 'best' tire combining min rolling resistance and max traction?
    >
    > I think you will not find any appreciable difference in performance in snow among road tires of a
    > given size. If you want better then use a mountain bike for your snow riding. A $100 used mountain
    > bike could make a great snow commuter.
    >
    > http://www.icebike.com/ is a good site to visit for winter riding info.

    Mountain bikes are definately the way to go when it's slippery. The wider, softer tires stay hooked
    up better, and the bike is easier to control when it starts slipping. You can actually recover from
    slips and slides on a mountain bike, where with a traditional road bike you're down before you even
    know what's happening. Suspension helps too -- it can help keep the front wheel hooked up, plus it's
    more comfortable on bumpy, rutty, icy streets. Finally, for when it's really bad, you can get nice
    studded tires for mountain bikes.

    Matt O.
     
  4. > http://www.icebike.com/ is a good site to visit for winter riding info.

    From the page about black ice:

    "Turns on Black Ice are best accomplished by keeping the bike as upright as possible. This may
    involve offsetting your upper body to the side (toward the direction you want to turn) while at the
    same time keeping the bike upright. The principal reason to keep the bike upright is NOT to keep
    more of your tire tread (or studs) in contact with the road, but more simply, that a leaning bike
    necessarily puts lateral forces on the tire at the contact patch. The contact patch (where the
    rubber meets the ice) is that preciously small area providing all the traction. Black Ice frequently
    does not supply enough traction to counteract this lateral force, the tire slips out from under you,
    and down you go. "

    Isn't this statement not only erroneous, but self-contradicting???

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  5. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Dave S wrote:

    > I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow. What's the
    > largest tire that will fit under my Chorus brakes? Have any suggestions for a 'best' tire
    > combining min rolling resistance and max traction?
    >
    > Also, have any feedback on Tufo's clincher tubulars?
    >
    > And yes, I'd love to get a cross bike but that'll have to wait until next year.

    If your area uses road salt, you'd be better off with a $30 thrift store bike than a pair of tires.

    Clearance under caliper varies by framebuilder. Can be 25 can be 30. Stop at LBS and slip in a
    wheel or two.

    Tufo's stuff is great and cheap too. Like their tub/clincher Cross, which probably won't fit under
    your caliper
    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  7. [email protected] (Dave S) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow.

    Dave, forget the junk miles, guys like me will be doing quality time indoors when the temp gets
    under 8 c or it looks like it might rain.

    That's how you improve your riding for next season.
     
  8. Fabrizio Mazzoleni <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Dave, forget the junk miles, guys like me will be doing quality time indoors when the temp gets
    : under 8 c or it looks like it might rain.
    :
    : That's how you improve your riding for next season.

    it's always darkest before the dawn, ey ryan?
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  9. ride a fixed gear "Dave S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow. What's the
    > largest tire that will fit under my Chorus brakes? Have any suggestions for a 'best' tire
    > combining min rolling resistance and max traction?
    >
    > Also, have any feedback on Tufo's clincher tubulars?
    >
    > And yes, I'd love to get a cross bike but that'll have to wait until next year.
    >
    > Thx, Dave
     
  10. On 4 Nov 2003 22:32:59 -0800, [email protected] (Fabrizio Mazzoleni) wrote:

    >Dave, forget the junk miles, guys like me will be doing quality time indoors when the temp gets
    >under 8 c or it looks like it might rain.
    >
    >That's how you improve your riding for next season.

    Maybe he's not riding "for next season" but rather for now, to commute and also perhaps just
    enjoy himself.

    JT

    *******************************************
    NB: reply-to address is munged

    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    *******************************************
     
  11. > >Dave, forget the junk miles, guys like me will be doing quality time indoors when the temp gets
    > >under 8 c or it looks like it might rain.
    > >
    > >That's how you improve your riding for next season.
    >
    > Maybe he's not riding "for next season" but rather for now, to commute and also perhaps just enjoy
    > himself.
    >
    > JT

    Your first mistake was to take any post by Fabrizio (or an imitator perhaps) seriously.
     
  12. If you plan on riding in snow I would recommend not-too-wide cross tires. Snow likes narrow tires. I
    used 700x28 last winter and that was fine. Drag on dry roads is not too bad, and grab in snow is
    good. Cheap, green and fine-looking !

    For more info you can join the ICEBIKE mailing list <http://www.icebike.org>

    Dave S <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm planning to commute through the winter and this will include riding in the snow. What's the
    > largest tire that will fit under my Chorus brakes? Have any suggestions for a 'best' tire
    > combining min rolling resistance and max traction?
    >
    > Also, have any feedback on Tufo's clincher tubulars?
    >
    > And yes, I'd love to get a cross bike but that'll have to wait until next year.
    >
    > Thx, Dave

    --
    Antoine Gautier

    Pour répondre remplacez yes par no To reply repace yes by no
     
  13. On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 00:56:50 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Turns on Black Ice are best accomplished by keeping the bike as upright as possible. This may
    >involve offsetting your upper body to the side (toward the direction you want to turn) while at the
    >same time keeping the bike upright. The principal reason to keep the bike upright is NOT to keep
    >more of your tire tread (or studs) in contact with the road, but more simply, that a leaning bike
    >necessarily puts lateral forces on the tire at the contact patch. The contact patch (where the
    >rubber meets the ice) is that preciously small area providing all the traction. Black Ice
    >frequently does not supply enough traction to counteract this lateral force, the tire slips out
    >from under you, and down you go. "
    >
    >Isn't this statement not only erroneous, but self-contradicting???

    Hmm. Well, if you're going to turn at speed, those lateral forces are going to exist whether the
    bike's upright or not (viz, cars breaking out of turns. They don't lean much/at all.). On the other
    hand, I *have* observed that keeping the bike upright helps in, well, keeping the bike upright in
    icy conditions. Course, the appropriate method is just to Not Ride Like A Frigging Maniac On Roads
    That Can't Support Those Speeds!

    Jasper
     
  14. Gary Young

    Gary Young Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > http://www.icebike.com/ is a good site to visit for winter riding info.
    >
    > From the page about black ice:
    >
    > "Turns on Black Ice are best accomplished by keeping the bike as upright as possible. This may
    > involve offsetting your upper body to the side (toward the direction you want to turn) while at
    > the same time keeping the bike upright. The principal reason to keep the bike upright is NOT to
    > keep more of your tire tread (or studs) in contact with the road, but more simply, that a leaning
    > bike necessarily puts lateral forces on the tire at the contact patch. The contact patch (where
    > the rubber meets the ice) is that preciously small area providing all the traction. Black Ice
    > frequently does not supply enough traction to counteract this lateral force, the tire slips out
    > from under you, and down you go. "
    >
    > Isn't this statement not only erroneous, but self-contradicting???

    I'm not sure if it's erroneous, but it's not necessarily self-contradictory. With a slick tire,
    wouldn't the contact remain the same size whether you're leaning or upright? Whether the same is
    true of knobbies depends on the design of the tread, I suppose.
     
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