beste handlebars and barends setup



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T

The Blue Randon

Guest
Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest and licking setup when we
talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic Marathon.

Thanks

Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
 
D

David Bailey

Guest
The Blue Randonneur <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest
and
> licking setup when we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic
> Marathon.
>
> Thanks
>
> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
>
Try a 1.5" carbon riser Answer Pro Taper or Easton Monkey lite. these bars are buttery smooth to
ride and the position gives you awesome leverge without sitting too high. barends are not an issue
cause you can use the ends of the riser for another postion with an wider stance.
 
P

Penny S.

Guest
David Bailey wrote:
> The Blue Randonneur <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest and licking setup when
>> we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic Marathon.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
>>
> Try a 1.5" carbon riser Answer Pro Taper or Easton Monkey lite. these bars are buttery smooth to
> ride and the position gives you awesome leverge without sitting too high. barends are not an issue
> cause you can use the ends of the riser for another postion with an wider stance.

besides, aren't bar ends passe` now?
 
T

Tbf

Guest
"The Blue Randonneur" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest
and
> licking setup when we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic
> Marathon.
>
> Thanks
>
> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
>
>

Ditch the bar-end idea, get an Easton or Answer carbon fibre bar, and slap some oury grips on it.
 
S

Stephen Baker

Guest
TBF says:

>Ditch the bar-end idea, get an Easton or Answer carbon fibre bar, and slap some oury grips on it.
>

Yeah, ditch the barends, but also ditch the Easton and Answer stuff and get an Uncle Jesse. You'll
never look back, and you'll never break it. If Clyde can't bust it, no-one can!

Steve
 
D

David L

Guest
"The Blue Randonneur" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest
and
> licking setup when we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic
> Marathon.
>
> Thanks
>
> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
>
>

Don't listen to anyone (or me ?) about barends, I think that the new carbon fiber barends are the
shiznit. Primarily barends are helpful on long rides, because they offer a variety of positions for
your hands. There are many to choose from various companies.

Dave
 
J

Jonathan Bond

Guest
Stephen Baker wrote:
> TBF says:
>
>
>>Ditch the bar-end idea, get an Easton or Answer carbon fibre bar, and slap some oury grips on it.
>>
>
>
> Yeah, ditch the barends, but also ditch the Easton and Answer stuff and get an Uncle Jesse. You'll
> never look back, and you'll never break it. If Clyde can't bust it, no-one can!
>
> Steve

But for those of us who AREN'T clydesdales, why not go with an easton carbon bar? Mine's held up
just fine to everything I've thrown at it, and its a hell of a lot lighter than those uncle
jesses... not to mention it absorbs some of that buzz (very little, I know, but just enough to take
the edge off).

thumbs up for the Oury grips tho, just stick a nickel into the end and you'll be good to go.

Jon Bond
 
M

Max

Guest
"Stephen Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Jon says:
>
> >But for those of us who AREN'T clydesdales, why not go with an easton carbon bar? Mine's held up
> >just fine to everything I've thrown at it, and its a hell of a lot lighter than those uncle
> >jesses... not to mention it absorbs some of that buzz (very little, I know, but just enough to
> >take the edge off).
>
> Yeah, yeah, yeah - the Jesse is a bit heavy (about a whole half-pound
heavier
> than the light stuff.) As far as the buzz is concerned, I use mine with a rigid fork and 50 psi in
> the tyres, and no buzz. You want to get rid of
the
> buzz, get off the pavement ;-))
>
> Steve

regardless of current fashions, I like my stubby woody barends, they are very comfortable on long
treks, and are small enough not to get in the way during one of my frequent wipeouts.

max
 
B

Bomba

Guest
The Blue Randonneur wrote:
> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest and licking setup when we
> talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic Marathon.

Bar ends may not be fashionable any more, but who gives a toss about fashion?

I like X-Lite stuff. It's not the lightest and it's not the cheapest, but it is very well made, and
the bars have a decent width - www.x-lite.com and you can order it from www.barracuda.be
 
S

Slacker

Guest
"bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> I like X-Lite stuff. It's not the lightest and it's not the cheapest, but it is very well made,
> and the bars have a decent width - www.x-lite.com and you can order it from www.barracuda.be

I don't know....???....I wouldn't want to get anything that doesn't have Peaty's endorsement!

--
Slacker
 
M

Martees

Guest
"The Blue Randonneur" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest
and
> licking setup when we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic
> Marathon.
>
> Thanks
>
> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
>
>

I don't know squat about best or hottest and licking has a whole different meaning to me than what I
THINK you meant. I use a riser bar AND barends and find it just right for me. Your best bet is to
buy everything then try each one and toss the stuff you don't like..............................
Barends give me another place to put my hands on longer rides and seem to give me a better leverage
point for hills. If heard the arguements against barends but I tend to go with what I like when it
comes to my bike and don't really pay allot of attention to what's "cool" today. Of course, being 44
tends to make me less patient with the "today" really kewl dewbie ****. Btw, I like the more upright
feel I get with my riser bar.

Marty
 
T

Tj Sackville-We

Guest
I just put some pulled back 'City' style handle bars on a Saracen Havoc downhill and totally
changed the riding dynamics of the bike. They rise up about 10cm and come back towards you about
the same amount.

Frankly before this bike was a dog to ride on the road, leaning forward like downhill bikes are set
up, bending your neck back to see ahead of you. Not to mention dangerous as the steering was so
sensitive with extra weight on the front wheel that the slightest inattention or false move and
you're swerving wildly off line. Into gutters, walls, or oncoming cars!

With city bars your weight is moved more to the back wheel, the center of gravity changes, and you
have much easier control over the trajectory using you body, not so much the bars, so you can lean
fearlessly into curves without wondering where you'll come out of them.

Check these pulled back bars out (from Nimrod Cycles UK) to see the style. If you're mostly on the
road then this cheap equipment option is what you need to make a mountain/downhill bike safe and
easy to ride.

http://www.nimrodcycles.co.uk/prod/new2002cat.html

TJ
 
R

Russell Pinder

Guest
"TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I just put some pulled back 'City' style handle bars on a Saracen Havoc downhill and totally
> changed the riding dynamics of the bike. They rise up about 10cm and come back towards you about
> the same amount.
>
> Frankly before this bike was a dog to ride on the road, leaning forward like downhill bikes are
> set up, bending your neck back to see ahead of you. Not to mention dangerous as the steering was
> so sensitive with extra weight on the front wheel that the slightest inattention or false move and
> you're swerving wildly off line. Into gutters, walls, or oncoming cars!
>
> With city bars your weight is moved more to the back wheel, the center of gravity changes, and you
> have much easier control over the trajectory using you body, not so much the bars, so you can lean
> fearlessly into curves without wondering where you'll come out of them.
>
> Check these pulled back bars out (from Nimrod Cycles UK) to see the style. If you're mostly on the
> road then this cheap equipment option is what you need to make a mountain/downhill bike safe and
> easy to ride.
>
> http://www.nimrodcycles.co.uk/prod/new2002cat.html
>
> TJ

Ever consider you might have got the wrong bike in the first place ?

Russ
 
T

Tj Sackville-We

Guest
"russell pinder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> "TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I just put some pulled back 'City' style handle bars on a Saracen Havoc downhill and totally
> > changed the riding dynamics of the bike. They rise up about 10cm and come back towards you about
> > the same amount.
> >
> > Frankly before this bike was a dog to ride on the road, leaning forward like downhill bikes are
> > set up, bending your neck back to see ahead of you. Not to mention dangerous as the steering was
> > so sensitive with extra weight on the front wheel that the slightest inattention or false move
> > and you're swerving wildly off line. Into gutters, walls, or oncoming cars!
> >
> > With city bars your weight is moved more to the back wheel, the center of gravity changes, and
> > you have much easier control over the trajectory using you body, not so much the bars, so you
> > can lean fearlessly into curves without wondering where you'll come out of them.
> >
> > Check these pulled back bars out (from Nimrod Cycles UK) to see the style. If you're mostly on
> > the road then this cheap equipment option is what you need to make a mountain/downhill bike safe
> > and easy to ride.
> >
> > http://www.nimrodcycles.co.uk/prod/new2002cat.html
> >
> > TJ
>
> Ever consider you might have got the wrong bike in the first place ?
>
> Russ

I don't feel to throw away a $600+ gift. I put Michelin Wildgripper City 1.5" tires on it and the
full suspension is a dream. But much too heavy for serious road riding. Strange thing is though,
people are always telling me what a great looking bike it is I could have sold it ten times over. TJ
 
W

Westie

Guest
"Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> David Bailey wrote:
> > The Blue Randonneur <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> >> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest and licking setup when
> >> we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic Marathon.
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >>
> >> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
> >>
> > Try a 1.5" carbon riser Answer Pro Taper or Easton Monkey lite. these bars are buttery smooth to
> > ride and the position gives you awesome leverge without sitting too high. barends are not an
> > issue cause you can use the ends of the riser for another postion with an wider stance.
>
>
> besides, aren't bar ends passe` now?

Only the purple anodised ones.

Westie
 
W

Westie

Guest
"TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "russell pinder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > "TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> > > I just put some pulled back 'City' style handle bars on a Saracen Havoc downhill and totally
> > > changed the riding dynamics of the bike. They rise up about 10cm and come back towards you
> > > about the same amount.
> > >
> > > Frankly before this bike was a dog to ride on the road, leaning forward like downhill bikes
> > > are set up, bending your neck back to see ahead of you. Not to mention dangerous as the
> > > steering was so sensitive with extra weight on the front wheel that the slightest inattention
> > > or false move and you're swerving wildly off line. Into gutters, walls, or oncoming cars!
> > >
> > > With city bars your weight is moved more to the back wheel, the center of gravity changes, and
> > > you have much easier control over the trajectory using you body, not so much the bars, so you
> > > can lean fearlessly into curves without wondering where you'll come out of them.
> > >
> > > Check these pulled back bars out (from Nimrod Cycles UK) to see the style. If you're mostly on
> > > the road then this cheap equipment option is what you need to make a mountain/downhill bike
> > > safe and easy to ride.
> > >
> > > http://www.nimrodcycles.co.uk/prod/new2002cat.html
> > >
> > > TJ
> >
> > Ever consider you might have got the wrong bike in the first place ?
> >
> > Russ
>
>
> I don't feel to throw away a $600+ gift. I put Michelin Wildgripper City 1.5" tires on it and
> the full suspension is a dream. But much too heavy for serious road riding. Strange thing is
> though, people are always telling me what a great looking bike it is I could have sold it ten
> times over. TJ

Without trying to be insulting, perhaps you should. Or more to the point, why don't you?

Westie
 
T

Tj Sackville-We

Guest
"Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > "russell pinder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:<[email protected]>...
> > > "TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > > news:[email protected]...
> > > > I just put some pulled back 'City' style handle bars on a Saracen Havoc downhill and totally
> > > > changed the riding dynamics of the bike. They rise up about 10cm and come back towards you
> > > > about the same amount.
> > > >
> > > > Frankly before this bike was a dog to ride on the road, leaning forward like downhill bikes
> > > > are set up, bending your neck back to see ahead of you. Not to mention dangerous as the
> > > > steering was so sensitive with extra weight on the front wheel that the slightest
> > > > inattention or false move and you're swerving wildly off line. Into gutters, walls, or
> > > > oncoming cars!
> > > >
> > > > With city bars your weight is moved more to the back wheel, the center of gravity changes,
> > > > and you have much easier control over the trajectory using you body, not so much the bars,
> > > > so you can lean fearlessly into curves without wondering where you'll come out of them.
> > > >
> > > > Check these pulled back bars out (from Nimrod Cycles UK) to see the style. If you're mostly
> > > > on the road then this cheap equipment option is what you need to make a mountain/downhill
> > > > bike safe and easy to ride.
> > > >
> > > > http://www.nimrodcycles.co.uk/prod/new2002cat.html
> > > >
> > > > TJ
> > >
> > > Ever consider you might have got the wrong bike in the first place ?
> > >
> > > Russ
> >
> >
> > I don't feel to throw away a $600+ gift. I put Michelin Wildgripper City 1.5" tires on it and
> > the full suspension is a dream. But much too heavy for serious road riding. Strange thing is
> > though, people are always telling me what a great looking bike it is I could have sold it ten
> > times over. TJ
>
> Without trying to be insulting, perhaps you should. Or more to the point, why don't you?
>
> Westie

Important to consider person who gave it to me. Besides for $50 for the road tires and bars is a
small price to pay to do a makeover and keep everybody happy. My only point for the original post is
simply that IF you have a MTB or downhill bike changing handlebars so you sit up a little bit higher
and straighters, moving more weight onto the rear wheel changes the whole riding experience.
 
D

David L

Guest
"TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > "TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> > > "russell pinder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:<[email protected]>...
> > > > "TJ Sackville-West" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > > > news:[email protected]...
> > > > > I just put some pulled back 'City' style handle bars on a Saracen Havoc downhill and
> > > > > totally changed the riding dynamics of the
bike.
> > > > > They rise up about 10cm and come back towards you about the same amount.
> > > > >
> > > > > Frankly before this bike was a dog to ride on the road, leaning forward like downhill
> > > > > bikes are set up, bending your neck back to see ahead of
you.
> > > > > Not to mention dangerous as the steering was so sensitive with
extra
> > > > > weight on the front wheel that the slightest inattention or false
move
> > > > > and you're swerving wildly off line. Into gutters, walls, or
oncoming
> > > > > cars!
> > > > >
> > > > > With city bars your weight is moved more to the back wheel, the
center
> > > > > of gravity changes, and you have much easier control over the trajectory using you body,
> > > > > not so much the bars, so you can lean fearlessly into curves without wondering where
> > > > > you'll come out of them.
> > > > >
> > > > > Check these pulled back bars out (from Nimrod Cycles UK) to see
the
> > > > > style. If you're mostly on the road then this cheap equipment option is what
you
> > > > > need to make a mountain/downhill bike safe and easy to ride.
> > > > >
> > > > > http://www.nimrodcycles.co.uk/prod/new2002cat.html
> > > > >
> > > > > TJ
> > > >
> > > > Ever consider you might have got the wrong bike in the first place ?
> > > >
> > > > Russ
> > >
> > >
> > > I don't feel to throw away a $600+ gift. I put Michelin Wildgripper City 1.5" tires on it and
> > > the full suspension is a dream. But much too heavy for serious road riding. Strange thing is
> > > though, people are always telling me what a great looking bike it is I could have sold it ten
> > > times over. TJ
> >
> > Without trying to be insulting, perhaps you should. Or more to the point, why don't you?
> >
> > Westie
>
> Important to consider person who gave it to me. Besides for $50 for the road tires and bars is a
> small price to pay to do a makeover and keep everybody happy. My only point for the original post
> is simply that IF you have a MTB or downhill bike

MTB or downhill?

changing handlebars so you sit
> up a little bit higher and straighters, moving more weight onto the rear wheel changes the whole
> riding experience.
 
D

Dave Jackson

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote:

> David Bailey wrote:
> > The Blue Randonneur <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> >> Can some of you die hard mountain bikers tell me whats the best, hottest and licking setup when
> >> we talking about Handlebars and Bar-Ends on my new obtained Specialized Eppic Marathon.
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >>
> >> Lonny Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Europe)
> >>
> > Try a 1.5" carbon riser Answer Pro Taper or Easton Monkey lite. these bars are buttery smooth to
> > ride and the position gives you awesome leverge without sitting too high. barends are not an
> > issue cause you can use the ends of the riser for another postion with an wider stance.
>
>
> besides, aren't bar ends passe` now?
>
>
>

I like bar ends for the extra hard positions I get.

Dave in Minnesota
 
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