Betsy Stands By Her Testimony



T

Tere

Guest
B. Lafferty wrote:
> "RicodJour" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Warren G wrote:
> >> RicodJour wrote:
> >> > Warren G wrote:
> >> > > In a case like this, the substances one might admit to have used
> >> > > previously, and long enough prior to the questions, could make the
> >> > > possible answer(s) unimportant for that patient at that time. If the
> >> > > patient later asked for an (unimportant) answer(s) to be removed from
> >> > > the file, or not added to the file, it could be done.
> >> > >
> >> > > Perhaps some questions are not a matter of privacy if the other
> >> > > people
> >> > > in the room already know the answers.
> >> >
> >> > I wouldn't want you as my doctor or lawyer.
> >> >
> >> > Long enough prior...? What, like a statue of limitations? We're
> >> > talking months, not years.
> >> >
> >> > "Oh, by the way doctor, could you please remove that comment I made
> >> > about EPO from my chart, the scanned copies, and the computer files
> >> > across all of the servers? Thanks."
> >> >
> >> > R
> >>
> >> When did you last take x? It was 3 months ago. Okay, then it is no
> >> longer relevant. Later that day, Since you said it's not relevant could
> >> you please not put anything about that in my file (it is my right,
> >> afterall)?

> >
> > Hayzeus frickin' keereist! Any more conditions you'd like to put on
> > this mythical conversation? Maybe the doctor was hard of hearing and
> > when Lance babbled that he liked Star Wars and C3P0 the doctor heard
> > EPO? How about the people in the room were a priest, a rabbi and a
> > druid? Traveling salesman and a farmer's daughter? Stop me if you've
> > heard this one.
> >
> > Lance treats people like they're plug and play replaceable - his life,
> > his call. Exactly how large of a circle do you believe such a person
> > would broadcast such sensitive information? Oh, right - I forgot that
> > Brian pointed out that Lance was probably drugged out of his mind...

>
> No. I never said he was drugged out of his mind. He was no doubt on a
> variety of med, some of which were probably for pain management. Frankly,
> if I were in his situation and the question were asked of me, I would answer
> truthfully as it would be in my best medical interest to do so.

[snip]

That I could see, having been in a comparible situation. I could even
see Lance
saying it'd be ok that the Andreus stay in the room, if he was asked.
But I think it would be highly unusual for a doctor to ask. More likely
he'd say something to the effect of "We need to talk. Please wait in
the waiting room. I'll get you when I'm done." If Lance thought the doc
was about to deliver a death sentence, he might say (cue the strings),
"Doc, I'd rather them stay."

OTOH, I could also see Lance asking them to leave if the questions got
too sensitive. "It's ok if they stay, doc." "Ok. Lance, have you ever
used and performance enhancers?" "...It'd probably be best if you guys
waited outside till I'm done talking to the doctor." Especially if
Frankie *didn't* know and Lance didn't have to put him in an awkward
position."

I could also see a doc taking a history 3 days post op. There is still
medical treatment going one, and it will managed by docs other than the
surgeon. A good doc will always get first hand info if he can, and if
it doesn't interfere with treatment, rather than rely on 2nd hand info,
even from another doc.

While docs may self-edit, I don't believe that he would leave *any*
drung use history out, no matter who old, whether or not it was
illicit. If a patient tells a doc he used this drug, vitamin, OTC
cream, it goes in the chart.

Of course, none of us know what Lance's state of mind was at the time,
what is relationship was with the Andreus (i.e. did Frankie already
know that Lance doped?), what his realtionship with the doc was (i.e.
what aspect of Lance's care he was responsible for) and so on. We don't
know how competent the doc was. Was the hospital a teaching hospital?
All of this and more, would be used for or against the testomony.
Without that, all we can do is speculate. In fact, almost any
evaluation of the probabliliy a given scenario, is also purely
speculative.
 
C

Curtis L. Russell

Guest
On 7 Jul 2006 11:11:04 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

>They will not write down superfluous details, as that cuts into their
>available time. I just do not see hospitals redacting details later
>on, as that places them at a huge potential liability. If he said it,
>and it was documented, it isn't going anywhere. Lance was not famous
>back then. He wasn't going to get the "Liz Taylor" VIP treatment.


I've supported three different medical systems in the past and none
permitted deletions, even at the redaction level, even with the
freehand text notes. You couldn't replace chart data once saved in any
of them - you could only mark them for non-inclusion in data sampling
or graphing. Hospitals generally don't like editing done to medical
records.

OTOH, seeing 32 patients? Thats 8 hours even moving relatively fast
and taking no breaks. I'm not sure I'd want to be one of his patients
by the time he got to his office.

Curtis L. Russell
Odenton, MD (USA)
Just someone on two wheels...
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Right. That's likely. God are you delusional. Did you find the Merckx
> 1973 quotes proving that he accepted ASO money to not ride the Tour? Come
> on ,Tom. Either or.


Sorry you're so impotent Brian, but then that IS your choice.
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
"B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote:

> No. I never said he was drugged out of his mind. He was no doubt on a
> variety of med, some of which were probably for pain management. Frankly,
> if I were in his situation and the question were asked of me, I would answer
> truthfully as it would be in my best medical interest to do so.


That's because you have nothing to hide.

--
Michael Press
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article
> <[email protected]>,
> "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> No. I never said he was drugged out of his mind. He was no doubt on a
>> variety of med, some of which were probably for pain management.
>> Frankly,
>> if I were in his situation and the question were asked of me, I would
>> answer
>> truthfully as it would be in my best medical interest to do so.

>
> That's because you have nothing to hide.


Including the fact that he hasn't any balls.
 
R

RonSonic

Guest
On 7 Jul 2006 10:18:23 -0700, "Warren G" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>RonSonic wrote:
>> On 6 Jul 2006 22:14:35 -0700, "Warren G" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> >In a case like this, the substances one might admit to have used
>> >previously, and long enough prior to the questions, could make the
>> >possible answer(s) unimportant for that patient at that time. If the
>> >patient later asked for an (unimportant) answer(s) to be removed from
>> >the file, or not added to the file, it could be done.
>> >
>> >Perhaps some questions are not a matter of privacy if the other people
>> >in the room already know the answers.

>>
>>
>> Think about it. Would you even ask?
>>
>> Ron

>
>By "other people" I meant family, friends, co-workers, in a case such
>as this, not the person asking the question(s). "Do you want to do this
>in private?". "No, they can stay."


No. Even that question must be asked in private. Well, "must" if you want
straight answers. I'd say that especially applies to friends, family and cow
orkers.

Even the dumbest rookie cop or PI knows this, don't tell me there are doctors
who don't.

Ron