Bianchi Avenue sucks!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mark, May 13, 2003.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Just as a helpful warning to group readers..... Avoid Bianchi hybrids (like Avenue). Had nothing but
    problems with my POS. eom
     
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  2. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Just as a helpful warning to group readers..... Avoid Bianchi hybrids (like Avenue). Had nothing
    > but problems with my POS.

    I don't suppose you would want to elaborate? As in a concurrent thread, assembly and prep ( or lack
    thereof) makes a big difference!

    Unless you are saying that SRAM gear trains "suck"? Or are you saying that CrMo frames "suck"?

    Sniping a good quality bicycle because your local dealer cannot put one together properly is not
    fair to Bianchi, IMHO.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  3. Jake Bellows

    Jake Bellows Guest

    can you be more specific? have you owned other hybrids? I own a trek 7500fx and love it but have
    never even seen a Bianchi hybrid, I rode a Gary Fisher fast city, and a cannondale road warrior
    before making my choice.

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    Just as a helpful warning to group readers..... Avoid Bianchi hybrids (like Avenue). Had nothing but
    problems with my POS. eom
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Just as a helpful warning to group readers..... Avoid Bianchi hybrids (like Avenue). Had nothing
    > but problems with my POS. eom

    And other people have varying opinions on that subject:

    Consumer Reports Picks Best Bikes For Pavement

    MAY 13, 2003 -- YONKERS, NY (BRAIN)--Consumer Reports gave a thumbs up to most bikes sold through
    specialty retailers in its June issue 'Best Bicycles' ratings. However, it singled out bikes from
    Giant, Specialized and Bianchi among its top three consumer choices.

    The magazine grouped bikes in three categories: fitness bikes, essentially mountain bikes spec'd
    with road tires and flat handlebars; comfort bikes, those with upright seating, heavier frames and
    components and best suited for bike paths and neighborhoods; and less expensive road bikes featuring
    triple chain rings.

    In the fitness category, Consumer Reports rated the Giant Cypress SX as a Best Buy, followed by the
    Specialized Sirrus Expert and the Bianchi Strada. In the comfort category, the Giant Cypress,
    Specialized Crossroads and the Bianchi Avenue were its top picks. As for road bikes, magazine
    testers rated the Bianchi Eros, Klein's Q-Carbon and the LeMond Tourmalet as its top three picks.
    However, it rated the Raleigh Grand Prix as a Best Buy.

    In addition, the magazine also tested 10 saddles and while none were rated as ideal, it did note the
    Selle Italia Prolink Gel, the Serfas Women's RX and the Specialized Men's Milano Body Geometry.
    However, testers only used the saddles for 45 minutes on an indoor trainer.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. Mark

    Mark Guest

    > can you be more specific?

    Yes, I can.

    1. After 4 months, rust spots on chrome parts. My garage is only slightly humid but I had a Fuji
    Grand Tourer in there for 20 years and it looks fine.

    2. Hitting a small crack in the pavement puts the wheels out of true.

    3. The bracket attaching front derailleur to the frame come loose 4 times. Bike shop fixed it for
    free (you need some special tool to do this).

    4. Paint is coming off the front fork.

    5. The fixed gear selection thingy needs to be adjusted every week.

    6. Hit a small twig while going 2 MPH (approaching a Stop sign) and the bike came up 90 degrees on
    its front wheel. I fell to the side and severely damaged my wrist and knee. I have NO idea how a
    small twig could have caused a bike with a 200 pound rider to do a hand stand. My theory is that
    being 6"2 and riding relatively upright, the center of gravity is too high. (Not a Bianchi frame
    design problem I guess but a warning to other tall riders). On my touring bike, I hit plenty of
    objects and never ever had a bike "Stand up".

    I thought a hybrid should take more of a beating than a regular touring bike but this model seems to
    be very "sensitive". (And I'm talking about just black pavement riding, God forbid I try it on a
    gravel or dirt road).
     
  6. Zeeman

    Zeeman Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > 1. After 4 months, rust spots on chrome parts. My garage is only slightly humid but I had a Fuji
    > Grand Tourer in there for 20 years and it looks fine.

    I've been riding a Bianchi Boardwalk as my city bike for over ten years and am fairly happy with it.
    I don't recall a problem with premature rust. Talk to the dealer.

    > 2. Hitting a small crack in the pavement puts the wheels out of true.

    New wheels do go out of true easily, esepecially less-expensive mass-produced wheels. You will
    have to get them trued a couple of times before they start holding up. I imagine you got a free
    tune-up with your purchase. Get them re-trued then and then again a few hundred miles after that
    initial tune-up.

    > 3. The bracket attaching front derailleur to the frame come loose 4 times. Bike shop fixed it for
    > free (you need some special tool to do this).

    Strange. I find it hard to believe that is due to some component problem specific to the
    Bianchi, though.

    > 4. Paint is coming off the front fork.

    Flaking off due to nothing in particular or coming off due to mechanical abrasion? Scratch some pain
    in the area with your thumbnail and see if it flakes off easily. If so, I'd complain.

    > 5. The fixed gear selection thingy needs to be adjusted every week.

    Not entirely unusual with a brand new bike.

    > 6. Hit a small twig while going 2 MPH (approaching a Stop sign) and the bike came up 90 degrees on
    > its front wheel. I fell to the side and severely damaged my wrist and knee. I have NO idea how
    > a small twig could have caused a bike with a 200 pound rider to do a hand stand. My theory is
    > that being 6"2 and riding relatively upright, the center of gravity is too high. (Not a Bianchi
    > frame design problem I guess but a warning to other tall riders). On my touring bike, I hit
    > plenty of objects and never ever had a bike "Stand up".

    Riding more upright is like driving an SUV: You are more prone to tip over. As far as your accident
    is concerned, you are probably correct in that it wasn't a problem specific to your Bianchi. The
    factors probably included your balance at that moment, the angle your tire hit the twig, bike
    geometry (esp. wheelbase), tire geometry, etc.. It could happen on any bike. Most importantly: Get
    back on your bike. Don't let this fall affect your riding.

    > I thought a hybrid should take more of a beating than a regular touring bike but this model seems
    > to be very "sensitive". (And I'm talking about just black pavement riding, God forbid I try it on
    > a gravel or dirt road).

    It's my understanding the the Avenue is Bianchi's low-end hybrid. Though I believe that Bianchi
    produces good bikes in general, ultimately you must consider that you're not riding on
    higher-quality wheels and components and they may break down more often.
     
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