Bianchi Eros shifting question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul, Apr 11, 2003.

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  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi all,

    I just test drove the Bianchi Eros 2003 bike and it was quite a nice bike but I did find one thing
    kind of strange. The front derailler shifting was sort of funky. The sales guy was saying that it
    does "half shifting" where it won't shift to the next chainring, but it shifts half way between the
    two which causes it to rub on the chain a bit, then you shift again and it go to the next chainring.
    This will be my first road bike, but I found this odd. First is what he was saying true? And if so
    why is it like that? The front derailler is a Campy Mirage and the shifter is a Mirage ErgoPower. Is
    this type of thing just for the Campy shifters? I am planning on test riding some other bikes to
    compare but besides this quirk I really liked the bike.

    I am sure I would get use to shifting so it would shift smoother(double shifting). Or maybe it takes
    a little braking in for it to be smoother.

    Thanks for your help, Paul
     
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  2. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 11 Apr 2003 09:56:52 -0700, [email protected] (Paul) wrote:

    >The sales guy was saying that it does "half shifting" where it won't shift to the next chainring,
    >but it shifts half way between the two which causes it to rub on the chain a bit, then you shift
    >again and it go to the next chainring.

    Go to another shop. I would guess that the cable to the front derailleur is too slack. If the
    derailleur is mounted properly and the tension is correct, the chain jumps to the larger ring w/o
    a problem.
     
  3. A shy person wrote:

    > I just test drove the Bianchi Eros 2003 bike and it was quite a nice bike but I did find one thing
    > kind of strange. The front derailler shifting was sort of funky. The sales guy was saying that it
    > does "half shifting" where it won't shift to the next chainring, but it shifts half way between
    > the two which causes it to rub on the chain a bit, then you shift again and it go to the next
    > chainring. This will be my first road bike, but I found this odd. First is what he was saying
    > true? And if so why is it like that? The front derailler is a Campy Mirage and the shifter is a
    > Mirage ErgoPower. Is this type of thing just for the Campy shifters? I am planning on test riding
    > some other bikes to compare but besides this quirk I really liked the bike.
    >
    > I am sure I would get use to shifting so it would shift smoother(double shifting). Or maybe it
    > takes a little braking in for it to be smoother.

    Front shifting with Campagnolo is not indexed as such. There are clicks, lots of them, but they
    don't correspond to specific gears.

    You need to get used to the bike and as you do you'll learn how far to move the lever to make your
    shift properly.

    I'm surprised the sales guy didn't know this, or maybe he does but doesn't communicate too well.

    Sheldon "Cogito Ergo Sum" Brown +-----------------------------------+
    | A smoking section in a | restaurant is like a peeing | section in a swimming pool |
    +-----------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772
    FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  4. plau-<< The sales guy was saying that it does "half shifting" where it won't shift to the next
    chainring, but it shifts half way between the two which causes it to rub on the chain a bit, then
    you shift again and it go to the next chainring.

    The guy doesn't understand how Campagnolo shifters work. The front shifter is a 'ratcheting
    friction', not really 'indexed'. Push the lever, move the front der..until it shifts, not the
    'positional' ones of STI, which can be really finicky-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Paul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I just test drove the Bianchi Eros 2003 bike and it was quite a nice bike but I did find one thing
    > kind of strange. The front derailler shifting was sort of funky. The sales guy was saying that it
    > does "half shifting" where it won't shift to the next chainring, but it shifts half way between
    > the two which causes it to rub on the chain a bit, then you shift again and it go to the next
    > chainring. This will be my first road bike, but I found this odd. First is what he was saying
    > true? And if so why is it like that? The front derailler is a Campy Mirage and the shifter is a
    > Mirage ErgoPower. Is this type of thing just for the Campy shifters? I am planning on test riding
    > some other bikes to compare but besides this quirk I really liked the bike.
    >
    > I am sure I would get use to shifting so it would shift smoother(double shifting). Or maybe it
    > takes a little braking in for it to be smoother.

    There's a true statement in there someplace! Campagnolo fronts shift with micro-clicks that
    effectively are a friction-shifting format. That design allows a narrower front cage than an index
    front with (IMHO) better response. Also, a rider with small hands may shift by clicking several
    times with short motions rather than the long under-the-lever reach required of an STi shifter. Both
    systems can work, but the Campagnolo allows a wider selection of equipment ( works with just about
    any front changer or crank) and is friendlier to small hands.

    I think what the gentleman meant is that you don't need to shift all at once but can click in a few
    short throws. There is no point in shifting just enough to rub the chain but not enough to move it
    to the other ring!

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
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