Bianchi Project 5 Build ... Need Help!!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jsirabella, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. jsirabella

    jsirabella New Member

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    I am trying to build a cyclocross/touring bike from parts i win on ebay. I had a brand new poprod but being in NYC that did not last very long so while I keep my trek road under heavy locks and indoors I need some help.

    I won this Project 5 frame, bontrager 700 select wheels, cantliver brakes, shimano ultegra 600 crank and now a shimano 8 speed cassette. I need to know what kind of front and rear derailers. Any advice on a budget I should be checking for?

    I also have no idea about the stem, levers/shifters to work with my other equipment. All help very appreciated for the newbie builder.

    Just want it to be good enuf for training and commuting and if I want to go on tour with it may not be so bad.

    -js
     
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  2. cycleski

    cycleski New Member

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    For a budget and 8sp project then the shimano Sora is low cost for derailleurs front and rear. The high cost item tends to be the STI shifters, if you go the flat bar path then rapid fire shifters from the mtb range becomes an option at a lower cost and work with the sora gear. Sounds like you need to budget for a sturdy lock and chain :(.
     
  3. jsirabella

    jsirabella New Member

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    Hi,

    First thanks for the post and info...I am bidding on shimano 105 rear and front derailers...should it work for my bike?

    When you are talking STI do you mean "the flight deck" shifters?? I have them on my trek and really like them ofcourse. Can you still get that functionality of shifting gears other than through STI.

    I really want to get the bontrager CX lite handlebars, had them on my poprad and they were great.

    -js


     
  4. John M

    John M New Member

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    105 derailleurs should work with that set-up. Take a look at shimano 8s bar-end shifters. They are not as convenient as STI, but shift very well and and cost way less than integrated shifters (only about $50). They will also fit any drop bar.

    If you get CX lite bars, make sure you get a 25.4mm clamp size stem.
     
  5. jsirabella

    jsirabella New Member

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    I am just trying to figure out which stem to get...I do not know the diameter of the stem but know it needs to be a quill stem. My friend tell me it should be either 1 or 1 1/8th inch. I am having the same problem finding a seatpost as according to a site it needs to be 27.0 but I can not find any and people tell me that a 27.2mm will not fit...ugh.

    I will look into the bar end shifters...thanks for the post.

    -js


     
  6. John M

    John M New Member

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    The stem has three dimensions, one is the clamp size that fits the outside diameter of the bar. 26.0 is common road, 31.8 is oversized road or MTB, and 25.8 is common MTB and some cyclocross. There are other sizes though so you have to check the bar to be sure. The other stem dimension for quill stems is the diameter of the quill (the portion that goes into the fork). The size correlates with the INNER diameter of the fork. This is generally either 22.2mm (for 1-inch forks) or 25.4mm for 1 1/8-inch forks. By far the most common size for quill stems that fit road frames is the 22.2mm for the 1-inch forks. Stems for threadless headsets (non-quill) fit around the fork and are sized as 1- or 1 1/8-inch. The third dimension that the stem has is its length.

    27.0 mm seatposts are made. I saw a Ritchey comp on Speedgoat.com website. As far as the seatpost goes, you may be able to use a smaller diameter post with a shim. This is not elegant, but can work fine.
     
  7. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    Depends. If your cassette has a 27 or smaller biggest cog, the 105 derailleur will work. Sometimes you can cheat a little on that.

    If you happen to have a triple front crankset you'll probably want a long cage rear derailleur and a triple front derailleur with a deeper inner blade.
     
  8. jsirabella

    jsirabella New Member

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    I am using all used parts and the front crankset is a used Ultegra 600, two chain rings and my cassette is an eight speed 12 - 25. I think I should be ok based on what you wrote.

    How about the actual chain?? Any advice on which chain would work?

    -js


     
  9. jsirabella

    jsirabella New Member

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    Thanks for the info but I need to get out the ruler and measure the inner diameter of the fork. I will check speedgoat.com for the seat post.

    -js

     
  10. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    I'm fond of SRAM chains. You want a chain that matches the number of cogs on your cassette. A PC-58 will work fine. I personally lean toward the more expensive PC-68 but I think that's because I like the all silver color better.
     
  11. jsirabella

    jsirabella New Member

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    Thanks for the info ... just placed a bid for one pc-68 on ebay but you can get almost at same price from speedgoat.com

    Pretty soon I may have a bike here...

    -js


     
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