Bicycle chain that can be repaired on the road



I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
a double up front.
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
>I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.
>
> I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> a double up front.


Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way, but
not sure why carrying a spare power link should be such a big deal. Unless
you're doing an around-the-world tour, it's not likely you'd need more than
one of them (chains don't fail that often).

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
 
On Sep 10, 9:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>
> > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> > a double up front.

>
> Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way, but
> not sure why carrying a spare power link should be such a big deal. Unless
> you're doing an around-the-world tour,


Actually, I am...

it's not likely you'd need more than
> one of them (chains don't fail that often).
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
> On Sep 10, 9:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
>> > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
>> > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
>> > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
>> > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
>> > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
>> > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
>> > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
>> > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
>> > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
>> > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>>
>> > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
>> > a double up front.

>>
>> Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way,
>> but
>> not sure why carrying a spare power link should be such a big deal.
>> Unless
>> you're doing an around-the-world tour,

>
> Actually, I am...


Hope you're having a great time! You shouldn't need to carry more than one
(spare), since you're going to be using new chains along the way as well.
Even if you're doing 30k miles, that's maybe 15 chains at 2k miles each. You
shouldn't be breaking even 1 out of 15 chains, and if you're that concerned
about failures, chain "breakage" is less-likely than an event that might
twist your chain in such a manner that it no longer engages the cogs
properly, in which case you'd be carrying an entire spare chain.

> it's not likely you'd need more than
>> one of them (chains don't fail that often).


--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
 
N

Nate Knutson

Guest
On Sep 10, 12:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>
> > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> > a double up front.

>
> Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way,


There may be some lower end modern derailer chains out there where
it's safe, but KMC is vague about precisely which chains, if any, in
their lineup allow traditional reconnection, and AFAIK all the other
mfg's of 7+ speed chains specifically recommend against ever doing it.
I've found it pretty impossible to be able to point to any given
currently produced non-5/6spd der chain and say it's safe to reconnect
traditionally, knowing how dangerous it is to be wrong about this.
 
On Sep 10, 9:43 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> > On Sep 10, 9:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> >> > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> >> > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> >> > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> >> > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> >> > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> >> > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> >> > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> >> > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> >> > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> >> > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>
> >> > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> >> > a double up front.

>
> >> Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way,
> >> but
> >> not sure why carrying a spare power link should be such a big deal.
> >> Unless
> >> you're doing an around-the-world tour,

>
> > Actually, I am...

>
> Hope you're having a great time! You shouldn't need to carry more than one
> (spare), since you're going to be using new chains along the way as well.
> Even if you're doing 30k miles, that's maybe 15 chains at 2k miles each. You
> shouldn't be breaking even 1 out of 15 chains, and if you're that concerned
> about failures, chain "breakage" is less-likely than an event that might
> twist your chain in such a manner that it no longer engages the cogs
> properly, in which case you'd be carrying an entire spare chain.
>
> > it's not likely you'd need more than
> >> one of them (chains don't fail that often).

>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com



Even so, it's still nice to be able to shorten or lengthen the chain
if necessary. With KMC's configuration you can only shorten it!

I guess I'm behind the times--I think there's too much emphasis now on
performance and not enough on durability. The bicycle is such an
excellent expedition machine, yet there is very little out there that
caters well to the long-distance tourist who doesn't need oodles and
oodles of gears or complex shift mechanisms that cannot be repaired on
the road.
 
O

Ozark Bicycle

Guest
On Sep 10, 3:26 am, [email protected] wrote:
> On Sep 10, 9:43 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > > On Sep 10, 9:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> > >> >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> > >> > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> > >> > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> > >> > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> > >> > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> > >> > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> > >> > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> > >> > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> > >> > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> > >> > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> > >> > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>
> > >> > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> > >> > a double up front.

>
> > >> Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way,
> > >> but
> > >> not sure why carrying a spare power link should be such a big deal.
> > >> Unless
> > >> you're doing an around-the-world tour,

>
> > > Actually, I am...

>
> > Hope you're having a great time! You shouldn't need to carry more than one
> > (spare), since you're going to be using new chains along the way as well.
> > Even if you're doing 30k miles, that's maybe 15 chains at 2k miles each. You
> > shouldn't be breaking even 1 out of 15 chains, and if you're that concerned
> > about failures, chain "breakage" is less-likely than an event that might
> > twist your chain in such a manner that it no longer engages the cogs
> > properly, in which case you'd be carrying an entire spare chain.

>
> > > it's not likely you'd need more than
> > >> one of them (chains don't fail that often).

>
> > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> Even so, it's still nice to be able to shorten or lengthen the chain
> if necessary. With KMC's configuration you can only shorten it!
>
> I guess I'm behind the times--I think there's too much emphasis now on
> performance and not enough on durability. The bicycle is such an
> excellent expedition machine, yet there is very little out there that
> caters well to the long-distance tourist who doesn't need oodles and
> oodles of gears or complex shift mechanisms that cannot be repaired on
> the road.


The TaYa TB-15 chain meets your description. Note that this chain is
not compatible with "ramped" (Hyperglide, etc) freewheel/cassette type
rear cogs. You *might* find this chain packaged under the Bell name in
your Wal-Mart bike dept.

http://tinyurl.com/ykkldt

Click on "chain products", look for the TB-15

NOTE: I *am not* recommending this chain, just pointing out that such
chains exist.
 
V

Victor Kan

Guest
On Sep 10, 4:26 am, [email protected] wrote:
> Even so, it's still nice to be able to shorten or lengthen the chain
> if necessary. With KMC's configuration you can only shorten it!


Another problem with KMC's config is that their equivalent of the
"Power Link", ironically called the Missing Link, might not be
reusable.

Some of their links that look like SRAM's easy to use/re-use Power
Link have little nubs on them that make it very difficult (and for me
so far, effectively impossible) to undo them by hand.

I've successfully rejoined via an inexpensive chain tool the Shimano 9-
speed chain that came originally on my 8-speed bike before I "knew
better" that doing so is a no-no and didn't have any problems, but I
did eventually replace it with an SRAM PC-69 chain since I wanted the
Power Link ease of use (and it came in handy a few times on rides
where I threw the chain and it got wrapped up in the crank, requiring
breaking the chain to untangle).
 
L

landotter

Guest
On Sep 10, 2:12 am, [email protected] wrote:
> I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.
>
> I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> a double up front.


I've never had a problem with a 7/8 speed KMC and a chain tool--did
you get sold a 9/10 speed version or something?

If you're on the road in the States, and desperate, stop by a soul
sucking Walmart (FIE FIE FIE!) and pick up a couple of their cheapo
derailleur chains. About $8 and sold under the name "Bell". I've had
to use a couple when needing a chain on a Sunday for some project or
another. Can't tell you if they last, but the pins are easy to drive,
and they shift fine.

BTW, I've had no problem in the past with a traditional Rivoli tool
and an SRAM P48 or similar chain.
 
V

velodancer

Guest
On Sep 10, 12:43 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Hope you're having a great time! You shouldn't need to carry more than one
> (spare), since you're going to be using new chains along the way as well.
> Even if you're doing 30k miles, that's maybe 15 chains at 2k miles each.
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com


Good God! Is that the conventional wisdom? I've never replaced a chain
every 2,000 miles. In fact, I usually only change chains with new
bikes, or about every 10 years looking back at my history. True, I'm
not particularly high mileage, perhaps 6,000 miles a year mostly
commuting, unless I'm touring. Perhaps it is my slow pace that stops
my personal chains from wearing out?

At the rate that many here seem to change components, it is hard to
claim any environmental high ground for being cyclists. Or any
particular economy either over other forms of transportation.
 
J

Jay Beattie

Guest
On Sep 10, 12:47 am, Nate Knutson <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Sep 10, 12:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> > > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> > > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> > > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> > > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> > > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> > > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> > > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> > > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> > > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> > > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>
> > > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> > > a double up front.

>
> > Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way,

>
> There may be some lower end modern derailer chains out there where
> it's safe, but KMC is vague about precisely which chains, if any, in
> their lineup allow traditional reconnection, and AFAIK all the other
> mfg's of 7+ speed chains specifically recommend against ever doing it.
> I've found it pretty impossible to be able to point to any given
> currently produced non-5/6spd der chain and say it's safe to reconnect
> traditionally, knowing how dangerous it is to be wrong about this.- Hide quoted text -


I've been doing it on SRAM 8 and 9 speed chains since they hit the
market, although I use the quick link sometimes. I've never broken a
SRAM chain except at the quick link (twice). I generate a lot of
force on my chains since a good deal of my riding is climbing.
Breaking a chain is about a 5/10 on the dangerousness scale. It is
fairly high up on the inconvenience scale, however, if you do not have
a chain tool or a cellphone. -- Jay Beattie.
 
?

_

Guest
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 08:16:15 -0700, velodancer wrote:

> On Sep 10, 12:43 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> Hope you're having a great time! You shouldn't need to carry more than one
>> (spare), since you're going to be using new chains along the way as well.
>> Even if you're doing 30k miles, that's maybe 15 chains at 2k miles each.
>>
>> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> Good God! Is that the conventional wisdom? I've never replaced a chain
> every 2,000 miles. In fact, I usually only change chains with new
> bikes, or about every 10 years looking back at my history. True, I'm
> not particularly high mileage, perhaps 6,000 miles a year mostly
> commuting, unless I'm touring. Perhaps it is my slow pace that stops
> my personal chains from wearing out?
>


Part of this may be due to the recent fad for extremely narrow cogs - they
wear more quickly, and so the chains wear, and the manufacturers smile and
tell you how the *new*
Ultra-Super-Hyper-Ramped-repairable-only-with-special-tools-and-incompatible-with-all-other-models
chain and sprockets with make

a) shifting faster;
b) you younger;
c) bystanders of the opposite sex swoon as you approach.

and they'll do the same next time, and next time, until your pocketbook is
as thin as their products.
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
> Good God! Is that the conventional wisdom? I've never replaced a chain
> every 2,000 miles. In fact, I usually only change chains with new
> bikes, or about every 10 years looking back at my history. True, I'm
> not particularly high mileage, perhaps 6,000 miles a year mostly
> commuting, unless I'm touring. Perhaps it is my slow pace that stops
> my personal chains from wearing out?
>
> At the rate that many here seem to change components, it is hard to
> claim any environmental high ground for being cyclists. Or any
> particular economy either over other forms of transportation.


There are a number of things that contribute to shorter chain life,
including-

How clean the chain is kept. Some of us would rather spend time riding than
cleaning our bikes, so we lose on that one.
How much we weigh. Darn, lost again.
How much we ride in the hills. I'd go nuts riding in Kansas, so I'll take
this trade-off readily.
Modern 9 & 10-speed drivetrains are more susceptible to chain issues
(shifting suffers more when worn) compared to older drivetrains.

For what it's worth, I accidentally ran 3k miles on my 10-speed chain and
finally replaced it yesterday, mostly because it was gross (dirty enough
that individual links could barely be made out). Much happier drivetrain
now, although I probably took a lot of life out of the chainrings &
cassettes by waiting that long.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"velodancer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sep 10, 12:43 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> Hope you're having a great time! You shouldn't need to carry more than
>> one
>> (spare), since you're going to be using new chains along the way as well.
>> Even if you're doing 30k miles, that's maybe 15 chains at 2k miles each.
>>
>> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> Good God! Is that the conventional wisdom? I've never replaced a chain
> every 2,000 miles. In fact, I usually only change chains with new
> bikes, or about every 10 years looking back at my history. True, I'm
> not particularly high mileage, perhaps 6,000 miles a year mostly
> commuting, unless I'm touring. Perhaps it is my slow pace that stops
> my personal chains from wearing out?
>
> At the rate that many here seem to change components, it is hard to
> claim any environmental high ground for being cyclists. Or any
> particular economy either over other forms of transportation.
>
>
 
N

Nate Knutson

Guest
On Sep 10, 8:57 am, Jay Beattie <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Sep 10, 12:47 am, Nate Knutson <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Sep 10, 12:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
> > > >I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> > > > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> > > > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> > > > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> > > > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> > > > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> > > > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> > > > chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> > > > shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> > > > they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> > > > suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.

>
> > > > I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> > > > a double up front.

>
> > > Generally the less-expensive chains still connect the old-fashioned way,

>
> > There may be some lower end modern derailer chains out there where
> > it's safe, but KMC is vague about precisely which chains, if any, in
> > their lineup allow traditional reconnection, and AFAIK all the other
> > mfg's of 7+ speed chains specifically recommend against ever doing it.
> > I've found it pretty impossible to be able to point to any given
> > currently produced non-5/6spd der chain and say it's safe to reconnect
> > traditionally, knowing how dangerous it is to be wrong about this.- Hide quoted text -

>
> I've been doing it on SRAM 8 and 9 speed chains since they hit the
> market, although I use the quick link sometimes. I've never broken a
> SRAM chain except at the quick link (twice). I generate a lot of
> force on my chains since a good deal of my riding is climbing.
> Breaking a chain is about a 5/10 on the dangerousness scale. It is
> fairly high up on the inconvenience scale, however, if you do not have
> a chain tool or a cellphone. -- Jay Beattie.


yeah, this has been covered many times here.... i don't think that any
one person's experience, however extensive, really has much ability to
point to an answer in this case. i, for example, broke an 8spd sram
chain i had reconnected. shifting technique and rejoining technique
and sensitivity also probably play a role in the relative safety of
it. but i think the fact is that there is more than a little basis for
the mfg's telling people to only use special reconnecting links/pins,
and that's really the only safe thing to generically tell people to
do, or to do when working on lots of different bikes.
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair? The older Sachs
> chains used to be this way, and I found them to be unparalleled for
> shift quality and reliability, but I'm not sure I've bought one since
> they merged with SRAM. I noticed a number of posts on this forum that
> suggest they do not shift as well as they used to.
>
> I'm running an older eight-speed Sachs cluster--wide-range ratios, but
> a double up front.


Well, you could buy vintage chain.
Modern chain with a snap link is a positive, cheap and safe solution.
There's no good reason not to use one on an 8 chain.
Current chain design has thinner and harder side plates, tighter rivet
to plate fit and less, if any, rivet protrusion. All those features lead
one to a snap link. If you carry one or 2 along with your chain tool
you'll be adequately prepared.
N.B. the snap links are not interchangeable. Get one for your specific
chain. Oh, and yes, your present chain tool will remove a damaged link.
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
D

David L. Johnson

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair?


KMC chains are pretty cruddy, in my opinion. I have had much better
luck with SRAM. There is no problem carrying around a (I have two) of
the special links. It actually makes field chain repairs a breeze;
usually you just have to replace the failed, bent-up side plates with
the master link, and off you go. In fact, you can get away, usually,
with carrying these instead of a chain tool. On a tour, you'd want
both, but for your basic day ride, you'd be OK with just a couple master
links (Super-links, or whatever).

--

David L. Johnson

Let's not escape into mathematics. Let's stay with reality.
-- Michael Crichton
 
H

Hank Wirtz

Guest
On Sep 10, 7:26 pm, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]>
wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > I just bought a KMC replacement chain. Sadly, before I installing it,
> > I lost the "power link"--so I decided to do it the "old-fashioned
> > way." This does not work--while driving in the pin, the side-plate
> > cracked. Right now I'm touring--what am I supposed to do if the chain
> > breaks on the road? I don't particularly want to carry a "special
> > link" for every time this happens. Can anybody recommend a chain that
> > needs no special links or pins to shorten or repair?

>
> KMC chains are pretty cruddy, in my opinion. I have had much better
> luck with SRAM. There is no problem carrying around a (I have two) of
> the special links. It actually makes field chain repairs a breeze;
> usually you just have to replace the failed, bent-up side plates with
> the master link, and off you go. In fact, you can get away, usually,
> with carrying these instead of a chain tool. On a tour, you'd want
> both, but for your basic day ride, you'd be OK with just a couple master
> links (Super-links, or whatever).


Then how do you remove the damaged portion of the chain that's still
attached?
 
D

David L. Johnson

Guest
Hank Wirtz wrote:

> Then how do you remove the damaged portion of the chain that's still
> attached?
>

Well, I did say that, for a tour, carrying a chain tool would still be
needed. But, of few chain failures I have seen, most resulted in one
ruined link, which often is at least halfway apart already. If there is
a longer section that needs to be removed, well...

--

David L. Johnson

Let's be straight here. If we find something we can't understand we
like to call it something you can't understand, or indeed even
pronounce.
-- Douglas Adams
 
?

_

Guest
On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 08:45:21 -0400, David L. Johnson wrote:

> Hank Wirtz wrote:
>
>> Then how do you remove the damaged portion of the chain that's still
>> attached?
>>

> Well, I did say that, for a tour, carrying a chain tool would still be
> needed. But, of few chain failures I have seen, most resulted in one
> ruined link, which often is at least halfway apart already. If there is
> a longer section that needs to be removed, well...


The only chain failure I have had when touring was just such - a number of
the bushings cracked around their circumference. I would hear grinding
until the bits fell out, whereupon the chain almost immediately derailed.
Find the bad link, remove it, start off again. In 1200 miles the chain
shrunk by about 4 inches, and there were some rollers still in the middle
of the process of failure. New chain and cogs front and rear at the start.

I always carry a chain tool while touring and do not use chains that cannot
be fixed without special links or pins.
 
S

SMS

Guest
_ wrote:

> I always carry a chain tool while touring and do not use chains that cannot
> be fixed without special links or pins.


I can't imagine that many people tour without carrying a chain tool. The
Cool Tool ("http://www.southerntackle.com/proddetail.asp?prod=GR41945")
has it built into the tool, but there are other very small, very light
chain tools available as well.

OTOH, I have come across tourers with broken chains or broken rear
dérailleurs that I've assisted in getting back on the road, so maybe
people just don't think too hard about what they should bring to avoid
being stranded.