Bicycle Communications

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Michael Blomqui, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides? Are they routinely used by
    Bike Patrol during races? I've got two Radio Shack/Motorola brand with nice features and was
    wondering what the concensus was about their use. I have the wired remote earphone/mic accessory
    which makes them much easier to operate when riding.

    Michael Blomquist '99 VR40 LWB/USS Tucson Arizona
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike

    Mike Guest

    I have tried them and found out that they don't have enough range. I also tried the GMRS 1 watt
    double the power of FRS still not enough range, plus you have to buy a $75.00 dollar license from
    the FCC. I have reverted back to Cell phones, they work much better.

    "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides? Are they routinely used by
    > Bike Patrol during races? I've got two Radio Shack/Motorola brand with nice features and was
    > wondering what the
    concensus
    > was about their use. I have the wired remote earphone/mic accessory which makes them much easier
    > to operate when riding.
    >
    > Michael Blomquist '99 VR40 LWB/USS Tucson Arizona
     
  3. Derek Swift

    Derek Swift Guest

    I use them. The two mile range has been tested to pretty good results too.

    Derek

    In article <[email protected]>, "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides? Are they routinely used by
    > Bike Patrol during races? I've got two Radio Shack/Motorola brand with nice features and was
    > wondering what the concensus was about their use. I have the wired remote earphone/mic accessory
    > which makes them much easier to operate when riding.
     
  4. I have a pair of 47MHz radios (pre-FRS) that I've used. The one thing about cycling is that your
    ear is pretty much in the airflow. I couldn't get the VOX (Voice Operated Transmit) to work
    right. Either I got the squelch down so low that you had to yell just to get it to work (and it
    would cut out as your tone dropped), or you kept hearing wind on the downhills. I didn't want to
    have to use PTT.

    I solved the problem by getting a tandem. Now we're never out of earshot ;-)

    Chris Champion 1996 Vision R40 USS SWB 2001 Double Vision R85 USS

    "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides? Are they routinely used by
    > Bike Patrol during races? I've got two Radio Shack/Motorola brand with nice features and was
    > wondering what the concensus was about their use. I have the wired remote earphone/mic accessory
    > which makes them much easier to operate when riding.
    >
    > Michael Blomquist '99 VR40 LWB/USS Tucson Arizona
     
  5. My guess is the the FRS radios with the 2mi range are being replaced by the slightly more powerful
    new 5 milers. The longer range ones are priced at what the now bargain priced 2 milers were when
    first introduced. My thought is that I would prefer the added range.

    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Derek Swift" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I use them. The two mile range has been tested to pretty good results too.
    >
    > Derek
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides?
    Are
    > > they routinely used by Bike Patrol during races? I've got two Radio Shack/Motorola brand with
    > > nice features and was wondering what the
    concensus
    > > was about their use. I have the wired remote earphone/mic accessory
    which
    > > makes them much easier to operate when riding.
     
  6. Ren Hoek

    Ren Hoek Guest

    "Jude T. McGloin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My guess is the the FRS radios with the 2mi range are being replaced by the slightly more
    > powerful new 5 milers. The longer range ones are
    priced
    > at what the now bargain priced 2 milers were when first introduced. My thought is that I would
    > prefer the added range.
    >

    Most of the "5-mile range" is no more than marketing hype - save your money. These cheap GMRS
    radios generally don't have enough additional power to get anywhere near 5 miles - even the pricey
    Motorola T7200. Most of them have the same output power as their sibling FRS radios, just the
    additional channels. Also, the ones that do put out a little more power suffer from horrible
    battery life (go figure!).

    If you're interested in learning more, go wander through the GMRS Forum on Popular Wireless Mag's
    site: http://www.popularwireless.com/cgi-bin/forumdisplay.cgi?action=topics&forum=
    General+Mobile+Radio+Service+Forum&number=1

    You can get "real" 2-4Watt radios that'll work great - just not at Wal*Mart/Best Buy/etc...

    And by all means, if you do decide that GMRS is for you, make sure you stay legal and get the FCC
    license ($75/5years covers your entire family (except cousins...)) Please don't contribute to
    ruining a good thing.

    That reminds me, MURS is another option that, like FRS, doesn't require an FCC license. You can find
    more about it at that same site: http://www.popularwireless.com/cgi-bin/Ultimate.cgi

    -RenHoek
     
  7. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    The range/power of the FRS is limited by FCC regulation/law. Your guess is incorrect.

    "Jude T. McGloin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My guess is the the FRS radios with the 2mi range are being replaced by the slightly more
    > powerful new 5 milers. The longer range ones are
    priced
    > at what the now bargain priced 2 milers were when first introduced. My thought is that I would
    > prefer the added range.
    >
    > Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and
    > Sports, Inc 1-800-586-6645
     
  8. Michael Blomquist I've used them lots, check out my website www.recumbentstuff.com I've written a
    short article about their use, just click on "Some recumbent biking tips from Denny" The short is
    "Ridie Talkies" The range is somewhat limited, but with headsets or lapel mike's and earpieces they
    make keen intercoms for group rides. None of that trying to ride side by side on narrow roads or
    over the shoulder hollerin. The over water the range is the two miles easily. UHF radios like the
    FRS radio's have 'line of sight" range,.that is if you can "see" the other radio you can probably
    talk to it.

    "Derek Swift" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I use them. The two mile range has been tested to pretty good results too.
    >
    > Derek
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides?
     
  9. Family Radio Service (FRS) Used by family, friends, and associates to communicate within a
    neighborhood and while on group outings and generally has a communication range of less
    than one mile.

    General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) Available to an individual for two-way voice communication
    service to facilitate the activities of the individual's intermediate family members Limited to 5
    watts max output and requires a license (easy to get, good for 5 years). Most available units are
    currently limited 2 watts.

    There are now available combo FRS/GMRS. Generally most FRS units are of the 500mw or 1/2 watt
    variety some boast a whopping 1 watt. Considering that the FRS/GMRS frequency is
    462.5/467.7MHZ....your in the "line of sight" spectrum and terrain will have an impact. I currently
    use the older 500 mw 47mhz units and have been able to converse with the ride leader while I sweep
    the rear. The best performance I have had was about 2 miles on flat terrain with fresh 9 volts. The
    original use for these was to keep in contact with my wife while I was down on the boat. Helpful
    also in a Wal/Mart. If you ever have a group of Scouts or Mentorees on an outing I believe a set or
    two of the FRS/GMRS radios would be invaluable in keeping track of your group.

    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Ren Hoek" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Jude T. McGloin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > My guess is the the FRS radios with the 2mi range are being
    replaced
    > > by the slightly more powerful new 5 milers. The longer range ones are
    > priced
    > > at what the now bargain priced 2 milers were when first introduced. My thought is that I would
    > > prefer the added range.
    > >
    >
    > Most of the "5-mile range" is no more than marketing hype - save your
    money.
    > These cheap GMRS radios generally don't have enough additional power to
    get
    > anywhere near 5 miles - even the pricey Motorola T7200. Most of them have the same output power as
    > their sibling FRS radios, just the additional channels. Also, the ones that do put out a little
    > more power suffer from horrible battery life (go figure!).
    >
    > If you're interested in learning more, go wander through the GMRS Forum on Popular Wireless
    > Mag's site:
    >
    http://www.popularwireless.com/cgi-bin/forumdisplay.cgi?action=topics&forum=
    > General+Mobile+Radio+Service+Forum&number=1
    >
    > You can get "real" 2-4Watt radios that'll work great - just not at Wal*Mart/Best Buy/etc...
    >
    > And by all means, if you do decide that GMRS is for you, make sure you
    stay
    > legal and get the FCC license ($75/5years covers your entire family
    (except
    > cousins...)) Please don't contribute to ruining a good thing.
    >
    > That reminds me, MURS is another option that, like FRS, doesn't require an FCC license. You can
    > find more about it at that same site: http://www.popularwireless.com/cgi-bin/Ultimate.cgi
    >
    > -RenHoek
     
  10. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Hi Denny, Very nice page and good hints. Thanks. Your point about not having to ride side-by-side
    or to shout to talk is an excellent reason for using the radios. Most beneficially, I could just
    turn if off when Wheel Doc Hey Jude starts to "sing". ~~~ Al Kubeluis ~ Bacchetta Corsa ~
    Maryland ~ USA ~~~

    "Denny Voorhees" <[email protected]> wrote
    > I've used them lots, check out my website www.recumbentstuff.com I've written a short article
    > about their use, just click on "Some
    recumbent
    > biking tips from Denny" The short is "Ridie Talkies" The range is somewhat limited, but with
    > headsets or lapel mike's and earpieces they make keen intercoms for group rides. None of that
    > trying to ride side by side on narrow roads or over the shoulder hollerin. The over water the
    > range is the two miles easily. UHF radios like the FRS radio's have 'line of sight" range,.that is
    > if you can "see" the other
    radio
    > you can probably talk to it.
     
  11. Jack Pagel

    Jack Pagel Guest

    I've used a MURS radio (R.S.BTX-127) 151 Mhz with 2 watts output. It gave us +/- 1 mile range. Up to
    10 mile range when used with an external antenna. Jack 99 Vision SWB USS 96 Linear LWB USS

    Mike wrote:
    >
    > I have tried them and found out that they don't have enough range. I also tried the GMRS 1 watt
    > double the power of FRS still not enough range, plus you have to buy a $75.00 dollar license from
    > the FCC. I have reverted back to Cell phones, they work much better.
     
  12. Nice webpage and good advice. I hope to get some of our RIDERS group interested communications. It
    would be especially handy on long group rides where we get pretty stretched out. I like the
    recumbent T-shirt too. Gonna have to get me one of those.

    Michael Blomquist '99 VR40 LWB/USS Tucson Arizona

    "Denny Voorhees" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Michael Blomquist I've used them lots, check out my website www.recumbentstuff.com I've written a
    > short article about their use, just click on "Some
    recumbent
    > biking tips from Denny" The short is "Ridie Talkies" The range is somewhat limited, but with
    > headsets or lapel mike's and earpieces they make keen intercoms for group rides. None of that
    > trying to ride side by side on narrow roads or over the shoulder hollerin. The over water the
    > range is the two miles easily. UHF radios like the FRS radio's have 'line of sight" range,.that is
    > if you can "see" the other
    radio
    > you can probably talk to it.
    >
    > "Derek Swift" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I use them. The two mile range has been tested to pretty good results too.
    > >
    > > Derek
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Does anyone else out there use FRS radios for group comm during rides?
     
  13. Larry Varney

    Larry Varney Guest

    While there are drawbacks to this - the radios cost more than the generic FRS models, and you have
    to pass a test - think about getting an amateur radio license. With that, you can use hand-held
    radios similar to the FRS radios but with more power (usually), not to mention being able to use
    "repeaters" that will extend your range considerably. This may lead you into even more adventures in
    "ham" radio, not the least of which would be helping out with communications on many of the larger
    rides. While more and more are utilizing cell phones, many have found it's hard to beat a roving
    bunch of bikers and SAG vehicles using 2-meter radios, all in touch with each other and a central
    base station. Quite often the organizer of the event will give you a signifcant break on the ride
    fees for being a volunteer. For more info, especially for those in the US, check out the Bicycle
    Mobile Hams of America, at http://www.lafetra.com/bmha/ .

    --
    Larry Varney, KM4ZH Cold Spring, KY http://home.fuse.net/larryvarney
     
  14. ikayak

    ikayak New Member

    Joined:
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    Yes!!! Hams!!! We use 2 meter and it works for all our recreational fun needs, kayaking, biking, snowshoeing and backpacking. See you on the river, road, snow and trail.... KD7BED :D
     
  15. Douglas Cole

    Douglas Cole Guest

    ikayak wrote:

    > Larry Varney wrote:
    > > ...This may lead you into even more adventures in "ham" radio, not the least of which would be
    > > helping out with communications on many of the larger rides. While more and more are utilizing
    > > cell phones, many have found it's hard to beat a roving bunch of bikers and SAG vehicles using
    > > 2-meter radios, all in touch with each other and a central base station.
    >
    >
    >
    > Yes!!! Hams!!! We use 2 meter and it works for all our recreational fun needs, kayaking, biking,
    > snowshoeing and backpacking. See you on the river, road, snow and trail.... KD7BED :D
    >
    >

    You betcha , works great, I plan on mounting a 220MHz radio on my new 'bent that accesses my IRLP
    node and remote base, talking to the netherlands while I am riding my 'bent in Spokane County would
    be cool ;^)

    Wonder if there is a 'bent ham group ? I know there is a "bicycle-hams" group but maybe a more
    focused group for 'bent riders ?

    Thinking about putting GPS on my 'bent too :)

    happy pedal-hamming !

    --
    Douglas Cole N7BFS Spokane IRLP node owner AMSAT#26182 , K2 # 544 http://www.users.qwest.net/~cdoug3
    Registered Linux user # 188922
     
  16. Gary Krause

    Gary Krause Guest

    I use a 2 meter handheld for some of the rides that I do. You can't beat them. I'm usually part of
    the communications for the ride.

    Gary N7HTS

    Douglas Cole <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<j6Pga.203 [email protected]>...
    > ikayak wrote:
    >
    > > Larry Varney wrote:
    > > > ...This may lead you into even more adventures in "ham" radio, not the least of which would
    > > > be helping out with communications on many of the larger rides. While more and more are
    > > > utilizing cell phones, many have found it's hard to beat a roving bunch of bikers and SAG
    > > > vehicles using 2-meter radios, all in touch with each other and a central base station.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Yes!!! Hams!!! We use 2 meter and it works for all our recreational fun needs, kayaking, biking,
    > > snowshoeing and backpacking. See you on the river, road, snow and trail.... KD7BED :D
    > >
    > >
    >
    > You betcha , works great, I plan on mounting a 220MHz radio on my new 'bent that accesses my IRLP
    > node and remote base, talking to the netherlands while I am riding my 'bent in Spokane County
    > would be cool ;^)
    >
    > Wonder if there is a 'bent ham group ? I know there is a "bicycle-hams" group but maybe a more
    > focused group for 'bent riders ?
    >
    > Thinking about putting GPS on my 'bent too :)
    >
    > happy pedal-hamming !
     
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