Bicycle fitting



Phill P

New Member
Jul 9, 2006
513
0
0
45
You go to a good bike shop, talk to a lot of people, ride a number of bikes, go back to your shop, buy a bike, ride long and hard, learn, try to improve by adjusting the bike, or buy your next bike when you have an idea of what worked and what didn't with the first bike. If you got it fairly good on the first bike the second bike should only be for upgrade or wear out reasons.
 

Scotttri

Member
Oct 11, 2005
955
8
0
40
Phill P said:
You go to a good bike shop, talk to a lot of people, ride a number of bikes, go back to your shop, buy a bike, ride long and hard, learn, try to improve by adjusting the bike, or buy your next bike when you have an idea of what worked and what didn't with the first bike. If you got it fairly good on the first bike the second bike should only be for upgrade or wear out reasons.
ok maybe I should elaborate, how best do you set your bike up for correct size, ie seat hight etc... Is there any guides that say a bike shop would use?
 

mastronaut

New Member
Mar 23, 2006
73
0
0
Scotttri said:
ok maybe I should elaborate, how best do you set your bike up for correct size, ie seat hight etc... Is there any guides that say a bike shop would use?
The best way to judge is by riding, if I rode a bike that 'fit' I'd be on a 23" frame. I find riding a taller bike gives me better leg extension which fits my style.
Remember, we don't all fit like a cookie cutter, comfort is key. My maine ride is this 26" frame classic.
 

LeDomestique

New Member
Dec 7, 2006
149
0
0
Scotttri said:
ok maybe I should elaborate, how best do you set your bike up for correct size, ie seat hight etc... Is there any guides that say a bike shop would use?
A quick internet search will provide dozens of sites that provide guideliness on fitting. Read them, but don't take them for gospel. The best and only fitting system is to experiment till you find wha't comfortable for you.
 

chamelion

New Member
Jan 17, 2007
13
0
0
I have the bad habit of buying bikes even before I ride them, I just throw my leg over, stand erect and check the distance from the top tube to my jewels. If it's close, but not "too close", and the seat isn't fully extended that is ok for me. It's worked twice so far :D
 

oldSkoolXC

New Member
Jan 28, 2007
3
0
0
LeDomestique said:
A quick internet search will provide dozens of sites that provide guideliness on fitting. Read them, but don't take them for gospel. The best and only fitting system is to experiment till you find wha't comfortable for you.
This is a good place to start after you have determined your proper frame size.

You can take it a step further and get a professional fitting done at a higher end shop - this cost money though. They are trained and will do stroke analysis with lasers and nail down your optimum riding position adjusting the seat, stem, bars, cleat position. If you plan to race or ride at high volumes this is critical for maximum performance.
I had a fitting done with a F.I.S.T. (Fit Institute Slowtwitch)certified professional bike fitter, just google it - cost was $75, took about an hour, and it was the best 75 bucks I have ever spent on a bike, period.
 

mastronaut

New Member
Mar 23, 2006
73
0
0
Scotttri said:
ok maybe I should elaborate, how best do you set your bike up for correct size, ie seat hight etc... Is there any guides that say a bike shop would use?
I think what needs to be known here is how you plan on riding. Are you going to be in the spandex club, or are you more of a recreational rider? That definately will figure in to the whole process. I don't think spending $75 bucks will make a difference if you're just going bike pathing with the wife and kids. Cheers! :D
 

oldSkoolXC

New Member
Jan 28, 2007
3
0
0
mastronaut said:
I think what needs to be known here is how you plan on riding. Are you going to be in the spandex club, or are you more of a recreational rider? That definately will figure in to the whole process. I don't think spending $75 bucks will make a difference if you're just going bike pathing with the wife and kids. Cheers! :D
good point!
 

vascdoc

New Member
May 7, 2005
225
0
0
mastronaut said:
I think what needs to be known here is how you plan on riding. Are you going to be in the spandex club, or are you more of a recreational rider? That definately will figure in to the whole process. I don't think spending $75 bucks will make a difference if you're just going bike pathing with the wife and kids. Cheers! :D
I am not sure I agree with this statement. A good fit is a good fit. The principles and goals of a fit may vary. The result of a good fit is a correct riding position. This is helpful regardless of the type of ride.
 

sogood

New Member
Aug 24, 2006
2,148
0
36
vascdoc said:
I am not sure I agree with this statement. A good fit is a good fit. The principles and goals of a fit may vary. The result of a good fit is a correct riding position. This is helpful regardless of the type of ride.
A racer would want to optimize power and optimize the drop, while a social tourer would likely to want comfort foremost. So I would say that purpose is important. Yet again, a good fitter would go through these at the beginning.

Glad to see another vascular biker! ;)
 

mastronaut

New Member
Mar 23, 2006
73
0
0
sogood said:
A racer would want to optimize power and optimize the drop, while a social tourer would likely to want comfort foremost. So I would say that purpose is important. Yet again, a good fitter would go through these at the beginning.

Glad to see another vascular biker! ;)
I agree. I fit into the recreational category myself...:cool:
 

Scotttri

Member
Oct 11, 2005
955
8
0
40
Well I plan on raceing and rideing, probably 250-300km per week. I have a bike and i'm sure the frame size is about right it's just getting everything else set right. I do about 100-150km a week at the moment, but the bike doesn't feel likeit fits right
 

vascdoc

New Member
May 7, 2005
225
0
0
Scotttri said:
Well I plan on raceing and rideing, probably 250-300km per week. I have a bike and i'm sure the frame size is about right it's just getting everything else set right. I do about 100-150km a week at the moment, but the bike doesn't feel likeit fits right

Frame dimensions vary such that the the length of the tubes may not have the correct proportions or lengths. A good fitting may fine tune it but there are limits. Bike fitting has come a long distance in the last 40-50 years. A bike fit no longer involves standing over the frame and pulling the top tube into your crotch! :eek:

I bought a Cannondale six-thirteen over three years ago. I was measured and then fitted. I then had it checked out by a coach (who now is in Colorado for the Olympic Triathlon team). He used a Computrainer (which I now own), lasers for knee position, and other tools. He adjusted the cleats, and checked out all of the lengths for a bike. It turns out that the LBS did a fantastic job and he only had to move the seat back 1/4 inch. The bike feels fantastic and is the most comfortable I can recall in over 40 years of cycling. My position is a fairly aggressive racing stance but my comfort has not been compromised.

Understand that when the bike shop fitted me, I could have fit either a 52 or 54 cm frame. The compromises to make a 54 cm frame work, however, would have thrown the handling off. Instead, we used a 110 length stem and raised the seat. I was flexible enough not to use spacers for the bar. The bar by the way is a K-wing FSA and it is fantastic.

Do not be so confident that you know that a given frame is the correct size. Go to a good LBS that uses a fit system to get the facts. Your body will thank you.

So Good - Are you also a vascular surgeon? BTW I am also a Mac user since 1984 with the original Mac and also have a Garmin 305! :D