Bicycle Trainers: Need Advice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jjj, Dec 19, 2003.

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  1. Jjj

    Jjj Guest

    Hello.

    Sorry, this may be the upteenth time this sort of question has been posted on the NG but need to ask
    (I'm new). Looking to buy a trainer, some people have recommended rollers, what's the difference? Is
    it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter? Is there anything I should be looking
    out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.

    Jae
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >Hello. Sorry, this may be the upteenth time this sort of question has been posted on the NG but
    >need to ask (I'm new). Looking to buy a trainer, some people have recommended rollers, what's the
    >difference? Is it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter? Is there anything I
    >should be looking out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.

    basically, if you want to smooth out your spin and work on your bike handling skills, use rollers.
    If you want to get a strength workout, use a trainer. If you want to do both, get rollers with small
    drums or with a resistance unit on them.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  3. Tom Carrico

    Tom Carrico Guest

    I have tried both and much prefer rollers. I have the Kreitlers with the killer headwind attachment.
    The rollers force you to keep good form during the winter, and with the head wind attachment, a
    large blower, provide some level of strength conditioning. The only drawback to me is that they are
    louder than then the trainer I used to have. My kreitelers are three years old and look and work
    just like new. Built like a tank.
    --
    Tom Carrico http://www.ccdargo.com "JJJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello.
    >
    > Sorry, this may be the upteenth time this sort of question has been
    posted
    > on the NG but need to ask (I'm new). Looking to buy a trainer, some people have recommended
    > rollers, what's the difference? Is it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter?
    > Is there anything I should be looking out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.
    >
    > Jae
     
  4. jslee-<< Looking to buy a trainer, some people have recommended rollers, what's the difference? Is
    it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter? Is there anything I should be looking
    out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated. >><BR><BR>

    If you just want to ride all winter but can't do it outdoors, not looking to do 'sprints' and such,
    rollers are the best. The teach you to ride straight and in round pedal strokes and also the time
    goes by much more quickly since ya gotta pay attention to what you are doing. NOT hard to ride.

    Good ones are about $300(Kreittler), but a good stationary trainer(which is mindless, IMO) is too.
    Will last forever tho.

    Metal rollers, sealed bearings, foldable.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "JJJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello.
    >
    > Sorry, this may be the upteenth time this sort of question has been posted on the NG but need to
    > ask (I'm new). Looking to buy a trainer, some people have recommended rollers, what's the
    > difference?

    A trainer supports the bike, usually by clamping the rear wheel, rollers require balance. Some
    people consider the balance thing a plus, I consider a major drawback. I like watching a movie to
    pass the time on a trainer. If I'm really suffering, I'll just lower my head & close my eyes.
    Perhaps if I had a room with a view, I'd feel different.

    People make claims about rollers "smoothing" your pedal stroke. I think that's a bunch of old wive's
    tales (apologies to old wives). I've heard the same thing about fixed-gear riding. I don't
    particularly believe in pedal stroke dynamics in general, so "improving" them seems doubly dubious.

    > Is it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter? Is there anything I should be
    > looking out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.

    I'd much rather ride outdoors, so I do, all winter, here in Boston. I don't enjoy riding in the
    winter dark though, so if I couldn't swing the daylight times, I'd use a trainer more often. I do
    find a trainer to be really handy for working on a bike, I think of it as a rideable work stand.
     
  6. > People make claims about rollers "smoothing" your pedal stroke. I think
    that's
    > a bunch of old wive's tales (apologies to old wives). I've heard the same thing about fixed-gear
    > riding. I don't particularly believe in pedal
    stroke
    > dynamics in general, so "improving" them seems doubly dubious.

    If your only goal is to ride rollers, I'll go along with that, but if your goal is to become very
    proficient at them and do goofy things you've seen in racing films (like read a newspaper while
    riding one), then you WILL learn how to ride more smoothly. Either that or you're going to crash off
    them quite a bit!

    As for me, I have fond (?) memories of watching the car chase scene in the French Connection while
    on rollers, and getting into the action so much that I swerved right off them and crashed nastily.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52...
    > "JJJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Hello.
    > >
    > > Sorry, this may be the upteenth time this sort of question has been
    posted
    > > on the NG but need to ask (I'm new). Looking to buy a trainer, some
    people
    > > have recommended rollers, what's the difference?
    >
    > A trainer supports the bike, usually by clamping the rear wheel, rollers require balance. Some
    > people consider the balance thing a plus, I consider
    a
    > major drawback. I like watching a movie to pass the time on a trainer. If
    I'm
    > really suffering, I'll just lower my head & close my eyes. Perhaps if I
    had a
    > room with a view, I'd feel different.
    >
    > People make claims about rollers "smoothing" your pedal stroke. I think
    that's
    > a bunch of old wive's tales (apologies to old wives). I've heard the same thing about fixed-gear
    > riding. I don't particularly believe in pedal
    stroke
    > dynamics in general, so "improving" them seems doubly dubious.
    >
    > > Is it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter? Is there anything I should be
    > > looking out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.
    >
    > I'd much rather ride outdoors, so I do, all winter, here in Boston. I
    don't
    > enjoy riding in the winter dark though, so if I couldn't swing the
    daylight
    > times, I'd use a trainer more often. I do find a trainer to be really
    handy
    > for working on a bike, I think of it as a rideable work stand.
     
  7. While on the subject, any truth to the rumors that the "clamp the back wheel" type trainers can
    cause stress damage to the frame?

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > People make claims about rollers "smoothing" your pedal stroke. I think
    > that's
    > > a bunch of old wive's tales (apologies to old wives). I've heard the same thing about fixed-gear
    > > riding. I don't particularly believe in pedal
    > stroke
    > > dynamics in general, so "improving" them seems doubly dubious.
    >
    > If your only goal is to ride rollers, I'll go along with that, but if your goal is to become very
    > proficient at them and do goofy things you've seen in racing films (like read a newspaper while
    > riding one), then you WILL learn how to ride more smoothly. Either that or you're going to crash
    > off them quite a bit!
    >
    > As for me, I have fond (?) memories of watching the car chase scene in the French Connection while
    > on rollers, and getting into the action so much that I swerved right off them and crashed nastily.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]_s52...
    > > "JJJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Hello.
    > > >
    > > > Sorry, this may be the upteenth time this sort of question has been
    > posted
    > > > on the NG but need to ask (I'm new). Looking to buy a trainer, some
    > people
    > > > have recommended rollers, what's the difference?
    > >
    > > A trainer supports the bike, usually by clamping the rear wheel, rollers require balance. Some
    > > people consider the balance thing a plus, I consider
    > a
    > > major drawback. I like watching a movie to pass the time on a trainer. If
    > I'm
    > > really suffering, I'll just lower my head & close my eyes. Perhaps if I
    > had a
    > > room with a view, I'd feel different.
    > >
    > > People make claims about rollers "smoothing" your pedal stroke. I think
    > that's
    > > a bunch of old wive's tales (apologies to old wives). I've heard the same thing about fixed-gear
    > > riding. I don't particularly believe in pedal
    > stroke
    > > dynamics in general, so "improving" them seems doubly dubious.
    > >
    > > > Is it worth getting a trainer if you can ride throughout winter? Is there anything I should be
    > > > looking out for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.
    > >
    > > I'd much rather ride outdoors, so I do, all winter, here in Boston. I
    > don't
    > > enjoy riding in the winter dark though, so if I couldn't swing the
    > daylight
    > > times, I'd use a trainer more often. I do find a trainer to be really
    > handy
    > > for working on a bike, I think of it as a rideable work stand.
    > >
     
  8. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    [email protected] (Jonathan Quist) writes:

    > While on the subject, any truth to the rumors that the "clamp the back wheel" type trainers can
    > cause stress damage to the frame?

    I've had two frames crack at the left seat stay/seat lug junction, both of them being the bikes I
    used for my trainer in winter. I've never broken any other frames in that spot; so while I don't
    know that trainer use was the cause, I suspect it was.
     
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