Bicycling in 30-40F Temperatures



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Badger South

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On 2 Feb 2004 15:53:18 -0800, [email protected] (Robert) wrote:

<snippage>
>> What, exactly, are the type of gloves you have. (I'm in the market).
>>
>
>Thank you for your advice. I'm just a casual bicyclist who has started last year to bicycle on his
>vacations. With all the expensive synthetic stuff I would have to buy for cold temperaturers I
>think I'm going to postpone my trip until the spring. I did buy a pair of EMS WindPro men's gloves
>(on sale at $19.00) but they are now sold out on the website. You might call see if the catalog can
>find any in the stores (there is a decent chance they will find a pair). There are also another
>pair of excellent gloves that just went on sale (from $35.00 to $24.00) online that are windproof.
>These are very high tech that allows protection and excellent deterity. You can find them at:
>
>http://www.ems.com/products/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524442583774&FOLDER%3C%3Efol-
>der_id=2534374302580379&fromTemplate=navigation%2Fsubcategory.jsp&bmUID=1075765400329

Hey, thanks man. That's a nice site, and the Apollo gloves seem like what I'm looking for in a
bike glove.

-B
 
B

Badger South

Guest
On 02 Feb 2004 19:41:00 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:

>mark <[email protected]> wrote:
>: If you're wearing a helmet there are plenty of thin fleece and wool hats and/or balaclavas around
>: designed to go under bicycle, ski, and mountaineering helmets.
>
>a balaclava is serious overkill for 30 to 40F. i use a neck gaitor below 50F and add a second one
>under 20F.

Yeah, but you may not realize that there's a not-insignificant streamlining effect of wearing a form-
fitting balaclava, over the drag of hair and ears. More if you have Opie ears! ;-p

>for 40s i wear regular shorts, leg warmers, normal lightweight wool socks, booties if it's raining,
>a l/s wool base layer and a l/s wool jersey. in the 30s (or 40s raining) i swap the l/s jersey for
>a s/s jersey, keep the base layer and add a sugoi windhibitor evaporator zip jersey. for the 20s
>back to the l/s jersey with the base layer and sugoi jersey and add thick wool socks.
>
>for gloves a pair of pearl izumi pittards thermal fleece with 1 or 2 wool liners depending (they
>fit under pretty easily .. these gloves aren't tight fitting even in the right size).

That's a lot of wool. Are you related to anyone from NZ? Or maybe, like some NZ bikers, have your
own sheep? ;-)

-B
 
D

David Reuteler

Guest
Badger South <[email protected]> wrote:
: That's a lot of wool. Are you related to anyone from NZ? Or maybe, like some NZ bikers, have your
: own sheep? ;-)

me dear mum is australian. i have no sheep of my own, tho.
--
david reuteler [email protected]
 
P

Pete Hickey

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Robert <[email protected]> wrote:
>I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours daily
>(one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to be
>completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was thinking:

Since everyone is different (I'll even wear shorts at those temperatures), what I would suggest is
to just try it. Put on whatever you have, and go out for a half hour ride. Find out where you are
cold, and where you are warm, and do something about those areas. You'll get something much more
suited to YOU than ou wil get asking here.

-Pete

--
--
"It's a sad day for american capitalism when a man
can't fly a midget on a kite over Central Park."
J. Moran
 
P

Pete Hickey

Guest
>> With all the expensive synthetic stuff I would have to buy for cold temperaturers

In article <[email protected]>,
<[email protected]> wrote:

>_ Synthetic doesn't have to mean expensive. You can get perfectly useful poly gear at Walmart. Or
>you can get most outdoor gear at at least 50% off if you're willing to buy last year's gear.

If you don't care about what it looks like, you can get much better prices at Goodwill and second
hand stores.

--
--
"It's a sad day for american capitalism when a man
can't fly a midget on a kite over Central Park."
J. Moran
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
[email protected] (Pete Hickey) wrote:

>In article <[email protected]>, Robert <[email protected]> wrote:
>>I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
>>daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
>>be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
>>thinking:
>
>Since everyone is different (I'll even wear shorts at those temperatures), what I would suggest is
>to just try it. Put on whatever you have, and go out for a half hour ride. Find out where you are
>cold, and where you are warm, and do something about those areas. You'll get something much more
>suited to YOU than ou wil get asking here.

One other bit of advice - if you're warm when you start, you're WAY overdressed. You should be
uncomfortably cold for at least the first minute or two as you come up to speed. It's surprising how
nice it feels to ride "under-dressed" in cold weather once you're warm from exertion.

Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
 
C

Claire Petersky

Guest
"Mark Hickey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> [email protected] (Pete Hickey) wrote:

> One other bit of advice - if you're warm when you start, you're WAY overdressed. You should be
> uncomfortably cold for at least the first minute or two as you come up to speed. It's surprising
> how nice it feels to ride "under-dressed" in cold weather once you're warm from exertion.

I find this is true year-round, not just in the winter. There's a little wooded section I ride
through on my way to work that's 1/4 mile from my house. It's a rule that I have to be cold when I
ride through this section. It's just far enough that the warmth from the house has worn off, and
because it's so shady, it's a bit of a cold sink. This is always where I'm the coldest on my morning
ride to work. Even in the summer, I'll be riding through it in my sleeveless jersey and shorts
(remember what that's like :) ?) and think, "oooh, shiver me timbers" -- but know I have to be cold
there such that I won't be insufferably hot at the top of the hill at mile 3.

--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

Home of the meditative cyclist:
http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

New CD coming out this month! See: http://www.tiferet.net

"To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
was you."
 
D

Dane Jackson

Guest
Peter Cole <[email protected]> wrote:

> 30-40 degree rain is about the toughest condition to dress for. If it's dry, it's no biggie.
> Fenders make a huge difference in cold rain, especially with a front (at least mud flap).

I definitely can agree with this. In anything short of a full downpour, full fenders make a huge
difference. I've got full fenders this year, and I've chucked my booties away. They were far too
much hassle for the amount of good they did me. I'm looking at various toe booties, as they look far
easier to take on and off, and might do more good for me.

--
Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g A witty saying proves nothing, but saying
something pointless gets people's attention.
 
P

Pete Hickey

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:

>One other bit of advice - if you're warm when you start, you're WAY overdressed.

Maybe.... but not for me. I'll tell you why. I don'T get dressed then go out. I'd be cold before I
get warm. What I do, is get dressed, wait a few minutes in the house, so I'll start to get too warm,
then head out.... by the time I've cooled down, I've warmed up. Works for me.
--
--
"It's a sad day for american capitalism when a man
can't fly a midget on a kite over Central Park."
J. Moran
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
[email protected] (Pete Hickey) wrote:

>In article <[email protected]>, Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>One other bit of advice - if you're warm when you start, you're WAY overdressed.
>
>Maybe.... but not for me. I'll tell you why. I don'T get dressed then go out. I'd be cold before I
>get warm. What I do, is get dressed, wait a few minutes in the house, so I'll start to get too
>warm, then head out.... by the time I've cooled down, I've warmed up. Works for me.

Yeah, but Pete... remember that most of us think of "freezing" as "cold". You're probably riding
around in a speedo at that temperature. I've gotten soft living in too many warm places I think.

Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (Pete Hickey) writes:
> In article <[email protected]>, Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>One other bit of advice - if you're warm when you start, you're WAY overdressed.
>
> Maybe.... but not for me. I'll tell you why. I don'T get dressed then go out. I'd be cold before I
> get warm. What I do, is get dressed, wait a few minutes in the house, so I'll start to get too
> warm, then head out.... by the time I've cooled down, I've warmed up. Works for me.

I like to pre-warm my gloves on the furnace hot air duct before setting out. Gets 'em nice & toasty.

For awhile, anyway.

cheers, Tom

--
-- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
[point] bc [point] ca
 
P

Pete Hickey

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:

>Yeah, but Pete... remember that most of us think of "freezing" as "cold". You're probably riding
>around in a speedo at that temperature.

Not quite.
> I've gotten soft living in too many warm places I think.

It's funny, though, it's what you're used to. Cold is relative. In the Sept when we get our first
day of 30F, I find it cold, and wear extra clothes. Then, in late March, when we have a sunny day
around 30-40, I'll only wear a T-shirt.

Its not getting soft.

--
--
"It's a sad day for american capitalism when a man
can't fly a midget on a kite over Central Park."
J. Moran
 
C

Claire Petersky

Guest
"Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> I like to pre-warm my gloves on the furnace hot air duct before setting out. Gets 'em nice
> & toasty.
>
> For awhile, anyway.

Flipside -- every time I forget my gloves in the garage, and then have to put them on in the morning
-- oh no. Nothing like starting with cold, slightly damp gloves. I had to alternate stuffing each
hand up my fleece undershirt as I rode along for the first three miles of the ride this morning
until they finally warmed up.

--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

Home of the meditative cyclist:
http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

New CD coming out this month! See: http://www.tiferet.net

"To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
was you."
 
D

Dane Jackson

Guest
Claire Petersky <[email protected]> wrote:

> Flipside -- every time I forget my gloves in the garage, and then have to put them on in the
> morning -- oh no. Nothing like starting with cold, slightly damp gloves. I had to alternate
> stuffing each hand up my fleece undershirt as I rode along for the first three miles of the ride
> this morning until they finally warmed up.

I can tolerate that. Even less fun is when you didn't wring out your gloves from the *wet* ride home
last night. It's indescribably nasty to put your hand in a cold wet glove that *squishes*. [1]

[1] ROTted for those with moderately clean minds:

Yvxr znxvat ybir gb n cvrpr bs yvire va n zvyx-obggyr.

--
Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g For I do not do the good I want, but the
evil I do not want is what I do. -- Paul of Tarsus, (Saint Paul)
 
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