Bicycling Magazine subscription

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Cori, Apr 25, 2003.

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  1. Cori

    Cori Guest

    Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    will take 4 to 6 weeks.)

    Cori
     
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  2. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Cori" wrote:

    > Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    > haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    > will take 4 to 6 weeks.)

    I've never had a problem. I'm not thrilled with the mag though, except for an occasional piece. But
    I got a two year subscription on eBay for $10 so I don't complain too much. ;->

    Art Harris
     
  3. D.Putnam

    D.Putnam Guest

    I'm letting my subscription run out this time. I'm less than thrilled with the new look. And the
    buyers guide was a joke. I never ride off-road so that cuts out 50% of it. Remove all the
    advertisements for carb-free beer and vehicles and that leaves you with 25% remaining. The last 25%
    contains rehashed articles and snippets about nutrition, maintenance and "style".
     
  4. azrael1

    azrael1 Guest

    On Fri, 25 Apr 2003 16:06:33 GMT, Cori <[email protected]> wrote:

    I too have had the exact same problem with them this month!

    >Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    >haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    >will take 4 to 6 weeks.)
    >
    >Cori
     
  5. Zed

    Zed Guest

    I have fond memories of Bicycle Rider back in the mid-eighties. Well-written articles about the joys
    of cycling and experiencing the world by bike. About all Bicycling magazine could ever muster was
    articles about the joys of a new derailleur.

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Nope. Only mag I "subscribe" to is Adventure Cyclist (comes with my membership). Before that, you
    > would have to go back to Bicycle Rider. Both touring magazines.
     
  6. Tomp

    Tomp Guest

    I used to subscribe to several bicycling mags; I out grew them after a while. You will likely do the
    same, or just get bored with the repetition of the content.

    Pictures are always good though. And, you can always catch up at the doctor or dentists office.

    Cheers, Tp

    Cori wrote:

    > Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    > haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    > will take 4 to 6 weeks.)
    >
    > Cori

    --

    Tp

    -------- __o ----- -\<. ------ __o --- ( ) / ( ) ---- -\<. ----------------- ( ) / ( )
    ---------------------------------------------

    Freedom is not free; Free men are not equal; Equal men are not free.
     
  7. Cori

    Cori Guest

    TomP wrote:
    > I used to subscribe to several bicycling mags; I out grew them after a while. You will likely
    > do the same, or just get bored with the repetition of the content.

    I'm new enough to it that I still like the mag. Hey, I realize that it's fluff, but there are worse
    things out there to read, like the Enquirer.

    I just wish I'd receive the fluff that I've paid for, in the month that it's published.

    Cori
     
  8. TNEWSOME1

    TNEWSOME1 Guest

    Try the Rivendell Reader for a real cycling magazine! "Cori" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    > haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    > will take 4 to 6 weeks.)
    >
    > Cori
     
  9. Cori

    Cori Guest

    [email protected]com wrote:
    > Try the Rivendell Reader for a real cycling magazine! "Cori" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    >>haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    >>will take 4 to 6 weeks.)
    >>
    >>Cori
    >>
    >
    >
    >

    Does Barnes and Noble carry that? (I've NEVER seen it.)

    C
     
  10. dennisg

    dennisg New Member

    Joined:
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    If you're a roadie, the choices in magazines are pretty slim. Bicycling magazine is better than no magazine at all. At least you can read about new bikes and equipment, plus interesting rides to do. That's worth the cost of a subscription.
     
  11. Cori <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Does anyone here also subscribe. I love the magazine, but the customer service stinks. I still
    > haven't received the April issue, despite two e-mails to the contrary. (They claim that shipping
    > will take 4 to 6 weeks.)

    I read CyclingPlus, which is a British magazine. Much better than Bicycling; a fair balance between
    racing, touring & commuting....

    Bicycling suffers from being too performance-focused. If you aren't shaving your eyebrows off to
    gain a picosecond on the next 50km TT, or riding off clifftops on a frame with enough suspension to
    put the Golden Gate to shame, you're nobody. A real LycraLout rag.

    There isn't much in the way of practical, sane advice on how to get around by bicycle.

    Stateside, my local library gets it. I read it there, and it doesn't bug me that much.

    [off-topic flamebait below, warning]

    What is with American bike culture, anyway? In the US, bikes are either toys for kids or athletic
    equipment. Everything is to a program; rides are "training rides", everything to maximize
    performance....

    -Luigi
     
  12. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "dennisg" wrote:
    > If you're a roadie, the choices in magazines are pretty slim. Bicycling magazine is better than no
    > magazine at all. At least you can read about new bikes and equipment, plus interesting rides to
    > do. That's worth the cost of a subscription.

    Actually, there's a new road magazine coming out in the US called "Asphalt." It will feature
    contributions by Owen Mulholland, Maynard Hershon, Ron Peterson, and others. It's quite pricey, but
    is supposed to be high quality with no (or minimal) advertising.

    See: http://www.asphaltmag.com/first_issue/firstissue.htm

    Art Harris
     
  13. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >If you're a roadie, the choices in magazines are pretty slim. Bicycling magazine is better than no
    >magazine at all.

    I decided several years ago that Bicycling was not a good thing. Too much hype and too little honest
    evaluation.

    Give me rec.bicycles.misc or rec.bicycles.tech any day.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  14. dennisg

    dennisg New Member

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    Art, thanks for the link to Asphalt. I just subscribed.

    - Dennis in Seattle
     
  15. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "dennisg" wrote:
    > > If you're a roadie, the choices in magazines are pretty
    slim. Bicycling
    > > magazine is better than no magazine at all. At least you
    can read about
    > > new bikes and equipment, plus interesting rides to do.
    That's worth the
    > > cost of a subscription.
    >
    > Actually, there's a new road magazine coming out in the US
    called "Asphalt."
    > It will feature contributions by Owen Mulholland, Maynard
    Hershon, Ron
    > Peterson, and others. It's quite pricey, but is supposed
    to be high quality
    > with no (or minimal) advertising.
    >
    > See: http://www.asphaltmag.com/first_issue/firstissue.htm
    >

    I dunno about this one:

    "Out of the saddle efforts were markedly responsive. With the better weight distribution and the
    titanium's springiness, I was able to react quickly and confidently to pack movements. In addition
    while the titanium certainly absorbed a good amount of road shock, the QOR lacked that dulling feel
    we often associate with carbon fiber. "

    Same old, same-old. Give us a break, please!

    Matt O.
     
  16. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    Bicycling magazine is for whitey. Asphalt looks to be the same.

    The sport needs to showcase more minorites.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace I'm wet! I'm wild!
    12:07:39 AM 28 April 2003
     
  17. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    > [off-topic flamebait below, warning]
    >
    > What is with American bike culture, anyway? In the US, bikes are either toys for kids or athletic
    > equipment. Everything is to a program; rides are "training rides", everything to maximize
    > performance....

    You're right, unfortunately. In Europe, bikes are transportation, in the US they're recreation (this
    is a generalization - there are European recreational riders, I'm sure, but it covers the general
    situation).

    There is definitely the view in the US that bicycles are something that children ride until they're
    old enough to get their automotive driver's licenses, then quickly shed. It's a shame - bicycles are
    a great way to get some exercise and fresh air while also accomplishing the goal of getting
    somewhere! :)

    Don't ask me to explain my countrymen, but you've got an accurate view of the situation.

    Mark
     
  18. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 11:43:11 -0400, Mark <[email protected]> from Agilent Technologies wrote:

    >Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    >> [off-topic flamebait below, warning]
    >>
    >> What is with American bike culture, anyway? In the US, bikes are either toys for kids or athletic
    >> equipment. Everything is to a program; rides are "training rides", everything to maximize
    >> performance....
    >
    >You're right, unfortunately. In Europe, bikes are transportation, in the US they're recreation
    >(this is a generalization - there are European recreational riders, I'm sure, but it covers the
    >general situation).
    >
    >There is definitely the view in the US that bicycles are something that children ride until they're
    >old enough to get their automotive driver's licenses, then quickly shed. It's a shame - bicycles
    >are a great way to get some exercise and fresh air while also accomplishing the goal of getting
    >somewhere! :)
    >
    >Don't ask me to explain my countrymen, but you've got an accurate view of the situation.

    Bicycling's portrayal of American cycling is flawed.

    Many poor people in America use bikes as transport. In my deep south community, poor mostly
    translates into black minorities, which is a sham term here because blacks are a majority of my
    city's population. On my commutes, I'll often hook up with people using bikes to get around as daily
    transport.

    Their bikes, though, aren't quite ready for the pages of Bicycling magazine. The longer a person has
    been riding and/or the farther distances they commute, the better their bike tends to be. But none
    of them are things of great beauty except to the owners.

    Bicycling ignores that segment completely -- both poor and minorities. The big advertising money
    comes from companies selling expensive toys to privileged white adults. So that is the market they
    aim for. And thus, Bicycling is not an accurate portrayal of American cycling.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Is this the line for the latest whimsical
    YUGOSLAVIAN drama which also makes you want to CRY and reconsider the VIETNAM WAR?
    1:45:36 PM 28 April 2003
     
  19. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    > Bicycling's portrayal of American cycling is flawed.

    Their goal is to sell magazines, not "portray cycling."

    Are the cars in Car and Driver typical of what you see on the road?

    Are the women in Penthouse typical... well you get my drift. <g>

    Art Harris
     
  20. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Kevan Smith" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 11:43:11 -0400, Mark
    <[email protected]> from Agilent
    > Technologies wrote:
    >
    > >Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    > >> [off-topic flamebait below, warning]
    > >>
    > >> What is with American bike culture, anyway? In the US,
    bikes are
    > >> either toys for kids or athletic equipment. Everything
    is to a
    > >> program; rides are "training rides", everything to
    maximize
    > >> performance....
    > >
    > >You're right, unfortunately. In Europe, bikes are
    transportation, in
    > >the US they're recreation (this is a generalization -
    there are European
    > >recreational riders, I'm sure, but it covers the general
    situation).
    > >
    > >There is definitely the view in the US that bicycles are
    something that
    > >children ride until they're old enough to get their
    automotive driver's
    > >licenses, then quickly shed. It's a shame - bicycles are
    a great way to
    > >get some exercise and fresh air while also accomplishing
    the goal of
    > >getting somewhere! :)
    > >
    > >Don't ask me to explain my countrymen, but you've got an
    accurate view
    > >of the situation.
    >
    > Bicycling's portrayal of American cycling is flawed.
    >
    > Many poor people in America use bikes as transport. In my
    deep south community,
    > poor mostly translates into black minorities, which is a
    sham term here because
    > blacks are a majority of my city's population. On my
    commutes, I'll often hook
    > up with people using bikes to get around as daily
    transport.

    Where in the Deep South do you live?

    > Their bikes, though, aren't quite ready for the pages of
    Bicycling magazine. The
    > longer a person has been riding and/or the farther
    distances they commute, the
    > better their bike tends to be. But none of them are things
    of great beauty
    > except to the owners.
    >
    > Bicycling ignores that segment completely -- both poor and
    minorities. The big
    > advertising money comes from companies selling expensive
    toys to privileged
    > white adults. So that is the market they aim for. And
    thus, Bicycling is not an
    > accurate portrayal of American cycling.

    You hit a big nail right on the head.

    Even in oh-so-trendy southern CA, I bet there are more poor people riding bikes for transportation,
    than Buycycling-type yuppies, and riding longer distances daily too. In my old neighborhood, there
    was a steady stream of restaurant workers commuting home at 2am. I've talked to some of these people
    -- a Newport Beach to Santa Ana commute (10-15 miles) is pretty common. The favored bike seems to be
    a Pacific or Wal-Goose, usually fairly new, and in pretty good shape. Some of these guys are
    actually pretty fast. Bus-bike commutes are pretty common too.

    I would love to start a magazine or website featuring *all* cyclists, from around the world. Getting
    magazine distribution is pretty tough these days. You're very limited with what you can do -- it's
    kind of like getting radio airplay for musicians. If you don't have corporate backing and fit into
    an established pigeonhole, you can pretty much forget the whole thing -- unless you have a huge
    trust fund, and some good friends at a free-thinking publishing house.

    So a website makes more sense, plus it could be read around the world. (Most poor folks with access
    to magazines can probably also go to an internet cafe or library.) With current projects standing in
    the way, I won't be getting into this for a couple of years, but it *is* something I'd like to do
    eventually. I'm getting more seriously into cycling as a lifestyle as I get older.

    BTW, Bike magazine, as originally conceived by Surfer Publications, was to feature all kinds of
    cycling and cycling culture. But then mountain biking went from an adventure travel sport to a
    canned consumer marketing phenomenon, and its fate was sealed.

    I'd rather read about a day in the life of a pedi-cab driver in India than which kewl toonz some
    racer dood lissenz to. And I find $4000 Ti bikes about as interesting as gold plated bathroom
    fixtures, with which they have much in common.

    Matt O.
     
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