Bicyclist & driver argue about red light

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.soc archive' started by Bill Z., Sep 15, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bill Z.

    Bill Z. Guest

    A few days ago, I heard the following exchange between the passenger in a car and a bicyclist.

    Passenger: "You just ran a red light."

    Bicyclist: "F___ you" <repeated multiple times very
    loudly>.

    I was in a parking lot near a bank, about 30 feet from the road, and was not in a position to see if
    the red light was in fact run. Also, the passenger, while she did not sound angry, was speaking in a
    voice loud enough for me to be able to hear her from some distance off. The same is true of the
    bicyclist.

    The bicyclist's reaction is more an American thing than a cycling thing---lots of Americans get very
    angry when someone tells them they've screwed up, even when they have in fact screwed up.

    Bill

    --
    My real name backwards: nemuaZ lliB
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 01:01:56 GMT, [email protected] (Bill Z.) wrote:

    >The bicyclist's reaction is more an American thing than a cycling thing---lots of Americans get
    >very angry when someone tells them they've screwed up, even when they have in fact screwed up.

    Yep. I remember I was riding in the bike lane (clearly marked been there for years) and the traffic
    was stopped in the next lane due to construction. well the idiot without looking decides to turn
    across my path from the other direction. we just touch before stopping. He claimed that it was not a
    bike path and never was a bike path. My ride was ruined that day when the shakes set in it was a
    close one.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  3. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Steve Knight wrote:
    > On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 01:01:56 GMT, [email protected] (Bill Z.) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The bicyclist's reaction is more an American thing than a cycling thing---lots of Americans get
    >>very angry when someone tells them they've screwed up, even when they have in fact screwed up.
    >
    >
    > Yep. I remember I was riding in the bike lane (clearly marked been there for years) and the
    > traffic was stopped in the next lane due to construction. well the idiot without looking decides
    > to turn across my path from the other direction. we just touch before stopping. He claimed that it
    > was not a bike path and never was a bike path. My ride was ruined that day when the shakes set in
    > it was a close one.

    I took one of my favorite "inner city" rides today, on State Street in Salt Lake City. Now,
    residents of NYC, DC, San Fran or LA wouldn't recognize it as "downtown," but it's a business-filled
    six-laner with 40-45 mph speeds.

    I've done this road about 20 times in my life. It's a wide street, generally speaking, with useful
    shoulders most of the way, but has VERY frequent driveways leading to strip malls and office
    buildings. If you're fast, it's manageable. I was fast, because I avoided State Street on the upwind
    side of my ride.

    I've also been racing recently, to practice riding in a peloton. (Among other things, I guess.)

    I noticed myself riding more aggressively. If I needed to pass someone stopped or slowed in the
    turn-only shoulder lane, I whizzed by them on the left with about 2 feet to spare (it feels close).
    And I let myself approach within a foot of the rear of cars accelerating away from me.

    There were a half-dozen potentially risky situations, but like all of my city street rides (so far),
    no near-misses. I think Utah drivers are overall not bad for bikes, really.

    It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in traffic.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  4. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 23:40:02 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission
    http://www.xmission.com/ wrote:

    >There were a half-dozen potentially risky situations, but like all of my city street rides (so
    >far), no near-misses. I think Utah drivers are overall not bad for bikes, really.
    >
    >It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in traffic.

    Grasshopper -- do NOT become complacent or over confident in traffic. That way lies a toe tag.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Well, O.K. I'll compromise with my principles
    because of EXISTENTIAL DESPAIR!
    12:53:06 AM 16 September 2003
     
  5. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 23:40:02 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in traffic.

    or become a bike messenger (G)

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  6. Doug Haxton

    Doug Haxton Guest

    On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 00:53:11 -0500, Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    >On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 23:40:02 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission
    >http://www.xmission.com/ wrote:
    >
    >>There were a half-dozen potentially risky situations, but like all of my city street rides (so
    >>far), no near-misses. I think Utah drivers are overall not bad for bikes, really.
    >>
    >>It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in traffic.
    >
    >Grasshopper -- do NOT become complacent or over confident in traffic. That way lies a toe tag.

    The same advice applies to drivers of motorized vehicles as well. I have, on occasion, realized that
    I couldn't remember actually driving for the last few miles...it becomes that automatic.

    Doug
     
  7. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Kevan Smith wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 23:40:02 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission
    > http://www.xmission.com/ wrote:
    >
    >
    >>There were a half-dozen potentially risky situations, but like all of my city street rides (so
    >>far), no near-misses. I think Utah drivers are overall not bad for bikes, really.
    >>
    >>It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in traffic.
    >
    >
    > Grasshopper -- do NOT become complacent or over confident in traffic. That way lies a toe tag.

    How do you think I recognized the half-dozen potentially risky situations? :) It's the intellectual
    and sensory buzz that makes riding in city traffic unique and "enjoyable."

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  8. Trg

    Trg Guest

    "Raptor" <[email protected]> a √©crit dans le message de news:[email protected]...
    > Kevan Smith wrote:
    > > On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 23:40:02 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission http://www.xmission.com/
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>There were a half-dozen potentially risky situations, but like all of my city street rides (so
    > >>far), no near-misses. I think Utah drivers are overall not bad for bikes, really.
    > >>
    > >>It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in
    traffic.
    > >
    > >
    > > Grasshopper -- do NOT become complacent or over confident in traffic.
    That way
    > > lies a toe tag.
    >
    > How do you think I recognized the half-dozen potentially risky situations? :) It's the
    > intellectual and sensory buzz that makes riding in city traffic unique and "enjoyable."

    I have to admit that when I get out of work I go like hell. For 15 to 90 minutes (depending if I
    take the direct or scenic route home) my mind is completely clear of any thoughts having to do with
    work or home or relationships or anything that is not an immediate threat to my life and
    limb. It is a very cleansing, destressing focusing, meditative experience. Similar in technique but
    very different in effect to taking a motorcyle on the same route.

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 01/09/2003
     
  9. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 13:36:18 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission
    http://www.xmission.com/ wrote:

    >Kevan Smith wrote:
    >> On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 23:40:02 -0600, Raptor <[email protected]> from XMission
    >> http://www.xmission.com/ wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>There were a half-dozen potentially risky situations, but like all of my city street rides (so
    >>>far), no near-misses. I think Utah drivers are overall not bad for bikes, really.
    >>>
    >>>It seems to me that a little racing would improve one's skills in traffic.
    >>
    >>
    >> Grasshopper -- do NOT become complacent or over confident in traffic. That way lies a toe tag.
    >
    >How do you think I recognized the half-dozen potentially risky situations? :) It's the
    >intellectual and sensory buzz that makes riding in city traffic unique and "enjoyable."

    I agree. But it's easy to trance out on a familiar route. There lies danger.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace a sometimes distilling pigeon distills a
    lovely bitch?!?
    6:48:14 PM 16 September 2003
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...