Big Bunch of Questions I've Saved Up

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mark Thompson, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. 1. Brake Blocks for dual pivot. Are they all of a muchness? Do the expensive ones last longer, or
    just stop quicker? I'd very much like to stop quicker, but how much quicker would they stop me?

    2. Which gets more punctures, the front or the rear? I've got a kevlar tyre thingy on the front but
    the back tyre is a regular one. Was thinking of swapping them round.

    3. On the other hand, the posh tyre can be pumped up to a higher pressure than the regular tyre.
    Should I have the hard tyre at the front (it's a drop bar bike so is that where most of the
    weight (and therefore rolling resistance) is) or should it again go on the back so the front has
    the lower pressure tyre - less likely to skid out from under me? On the other hand when braking
    it's the back that normally skids first.

    4. Inner tubes. With presta valves. Are they all pretty much the same? Should I pay the extra for a
    brand name? What's the difference?

    5. Where to get chainsaw oil. Do they sell it in B&Q? I would just pop down and check, but I'd end
    up buying something - it's like a toyshop for grownups.

    Cheers.

    Mark.

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  2. Whingin' Pom

    Whingin' Pom Guest

    On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 03:58:41 -0000, "Mark Thompson"
    <[email protected] (change warm for hot)> wrote:

    >1. Brake Blocks for dual pivot. Are they all of a muchness? Do the expensive ones last longer, or
    > just stop quicker? I'd very much like to stop quicker, but how much quicker would they stop me?

    I've just swapped the el-cheapo comes-as-standard black blocks on my Giant OCR3 for the luscious Kool-
    Stop salmons. We have one or two hills around here, some of them are quite steep. IMO, Kool-Stops
    work much better than standard blocks at stopping a rapidly descending pie-eater, especially in the
    wet. I'm a convert. the wife quite likes them on her commuter bike, too.

    >2. Which gets more punctures, the front or the rear? I've got a kevlar tyre thingy on the front but
    > the back tyre is a regular one. Was thinking of swapping them round.

    Only the P*nct*r* F**ry can say... Seriously, I dunno. It's always been about 50/50 for me.

    Knackers. Now I'm for it. That's a run of p*nct*r*s in one tyre for me, now. :-(

    >3. On the other hand, the posh tyre can be pumped up to a higher pressure than the regular tyre.
    > Should I have the hard tyre at the front (it's a drop bar bike so is that where most of the
    > weight (and therefore rolling resistance) is) or should it again go on the back so the front has
    > the lower pressure tyre - less likely to skid out from under me? On the other hand when braking
    > it's the back that normally skids first.

    What pressures are you using? I run both my tyres at about 110psi. Seems to work fine for me.
    They're nothing special as tyres go, either. Have you read Sheldon on braking and tyre pressures?
    Might help a bit.

    >4. Inner tubes. With presta valves. Are they all pretty much the same? Should I pay the extra for a
    > brand name? What's the difference?

    I bought the Bonthrone 10 for a tenner ones. Even though they only sent me nine and refused to send
    another one, it's still works out not bad value. they're Raleigh ones and work OK for me. If you're
    prepared to deal with the cheating buggers, go for it. But don't say I didn't warn you.

    >5. Where to get chainsaw oil. Do they sell it in B&Q?

    They did when I last was there a few months back. That was one of the big ones, though.

    >I would just pop down and check, but I'd end up buying something - it's like a toyshop for
    >grownups.

    Ah. Can't help with that, other than to tell you if they have a shop called Machine Mart near you,
    avoid it. Like the plague. Don't look at their website, either. Or send off for a free catalogue.
    And this goes double for Axminster Tools.

    HTH.
    --
    Matt K Dunedin, NZ
     
  3. IanB

    IanB Guest

    "Mark Thompson" <[email protected] (change
    warm for hot)> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > 1. Brake Blocks for dual pivot. Are they all of a
    muchness? Do the expensive
    > ones last longer, or just stop quicker? I'd very much
    like to stop quicker, but
    > how much quicker would they stop me?

    I cannot comment on specific types of brake blocks, but remeber that if the block lasts a long time
    it is probably wearing your rim away faster, what would you rather replace??
    >
    > 2. Which gets more punctures, the front or the rear? I've
    got a kevlar tyre
    > thingy on the front but the back tyre is a regular one.
    Was thinking of
    > swapping them round.
    >
    It has been said on this ng previously that you should have the better tyre on the front for
    safeties sake, better to have a rear tyre fail than a front one or if a wheel is going to lose grip,
    again better the reare than the front

    > 3. On the other hand, the posh tyre can be pumped up to a
    higher pressure than
    > the regular tyre. Should I have the hard tyre at the
    front (it's a drop bar
    > bike so is that where most of the weight (and therefore
    rolling resistance) is)
    > or should it again go on the back so the front has the
    lower pressure tyre -
    > less likely to skid out from under me? On the other hand
    when braking it's the
    > back that normally skids first.
    >
    How much load are you carrying? Pick up an unloaded bike, you will probably find that the point of
    balance is under the tip of the saddle - i.e. 2/3rd of legth of bike which implies that the rear
    wheel carries twice the load. then add luggage, probably on carriers/bags at rear, then add your own
    body where your riding centre of gravity is somewhere just behind the bottom bracket (think legs
    heavier than arms).

    4. Inner tubes. With presta valves. Are they all pretty much the same? Should I pay the extra for a
    brand name? What's the difference?

    I prefer to have tubes with a over large diameter so that the patches (or associated bit of tube) do
    not need to be streetched too far. Some tubes are thick, some thin, the thick are probably slightly
    more thorn resistant (I have some with small nicks that have not turned into puctures yet). As for
    "branded" one leading brand seems to be getting a reputation for leaky valves. I bought via web site
    (as make weight to get free postage) tubes but was supplied with a different (the untrusted) and
    cheaper brand.

    5. Where to get chainsaw oil. Do they sell it in B&Q? I would just pop down and check, but I'd end
    up buying something - it's like a toyshop for grownups
    >
    > Cheers.
    >
    > Mark.
    >
    >

    --
    IanB

    n.b. as I subscribe to two large newsgroups it may be
    several days before I see a newsgroup response
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    IanB wrote:
    > I cannot comment on specific types of brake blocks, but remeber that if the block lasts a long
    > time it is probably wearing your rim away faster, what would you rather replace??

    Not necessarily. What wears rims more than anything is blocks that pick up and retain specks of
    metal. These blocks also tend to disintegrate quickly. Certain blocks such Kool Stop Salmon don't
    rip up rims like this.

    ~PB
     
  5. AndyMorris

    AndyMorris Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > IanB wrote:
    >> I cannot comment on specific types of brake blocks, but remeber that if the block lasts a long
    >> time it is probably wearing your rim away faster, what would you rather replace??
    >
    > Not necessarily. What wears rims more than anything is blocks that pick up and retain specks of
    > metal. These blocks also tend to disintegrate quickly. Certain blocks such Kool Stop Salmon don't
    > rip up rims like this.
    >
    > ~PB

    And certain blocks that come free with shimano brakes do it fantasticly well.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this:
    Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
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