Big Bunch of Questions I've Saved Up

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mark Thompson, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. 1. Brake Blocks for dual pivot. Are they all of a muchness? Do the expensive ones last longer, or
    just stop quicker? I'd very much like to stop quicker, but how much quicker would they stop me?

    2. Which gets more punctures, the front or the rear? I've got a kevlar tyre thingy on the front but
    the back tyre is a regular one. Was thinking of swapping them round.

    3. On the other hand, the posh tyre can be pumped up to a higher pressure than the regular tyre.
    Should I have the hard tyre at the front (it's a drop bar bike so is that where most of the
    weight (and therefore rolling resistance) is) or should it again go on the back so the front has
    the lower pressure tyre - less likely to skid out from under me? On the other hand when braking
    it's the back that normally skids first.

    4. Inner tubes. With presta valves. Are they all pretty much the same? Should I pay the extra for a
    brand name? What's the difference?

    5. Where to get chainsaw oil. Do they sell it in B&Q? I would just pop down and check, but I'd end
    up buying something - it's like a toyshop for grownups.

    Cheers.

    Mark.

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  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Mark Thompson wrote:
    > 1. Brake Blocks for dual pivot. Are they all of a muchness?

    For a lot of them, yes, but there a few exceptions.....

    > Do the expensive ones last longer

    Not necessarily. Kool Stop Salmon last longer than most though, and stop quickly. I also
    like Campag's.

    > or just stop quicker?

    Not necessarily.

    > I'd very much like to stop quicker, but how much quicker would they stop me?

    It's hard to quantify, a bit quicker if you're lucky is all I can say. Other factors make more
    diffference such as quality and condition of calipers; cable condition; cable routing; rims; rim
    condition; weight and weight distribution of bike and yourself. I've had very different results
    from using not just the same pads, but the exact same brakes on more than one bike. It's a weird
    tricky one.

    > 2. Which gets more punctures, the front or the rear?

    Rear on most bikes because of the extra weight and extra rubbish flipped up by the front tyre.

    > I've got a kevlar tyre thingy on the front but the back tyre is a regular one. Was thinking of
    > swapping them round.

    Good idea........

    > 3. On the other hand, the posh tyre can be pumped up to a higher pressure than the regular tyre.

    Ah....

    > Should I have the hard tyre at the front (it's a drop bar bike so is that where most of the
    > weight (and therefore rolling resistance) is)

    That's not correct. Despite relatively more weight going to the front compared with more upright
    bikes, more weight will still be on the rear tyre - except when braking heavily or maybe when
    standing and leaning forwards. Rear tyre, if same model & size as front, should therefore be pumped
    up harder. However, if tyres are different, wider tyres generally don't need such high pressure, but
    better quality tyres can often take a bit more than lower types of the same size.

    > or should it again go on the back so the front has the lower pressure tyre - less likely to skid
    > out from under me? On the other hand when braking it's the back that normally skids first.

    It's a dilema. Durability is more useful for rear tyre (cos it will wear up to five times
    faster); grip and basic reliability more important for front; wider front tyre will provide more
    front suspension and traction; wider rear tyre can take more weight. So there isn't a clear
    answer to this one.

    > 4. Inner tubes. With presta valves. Are they all pretty much the same?

    No, thickness/weight varies quite a lot; valves and type/quality of rubber (butyl) can be slightly
    different.

    > Should I pay the extra for a brand name? What's the difference?

    I'm not really sure if the big brands are actually more reliable or not. Anyway, I find Michelin
    tubes reliable and they make a good range of types and sizes; not expensive either.

    > 5. Where to get chainsaw oil. Do they sell it in B&Q? I would just pop down and check, but I'd end
    > up buying something - it's like a toyshop for grownups.

    Pass.

    ~PB
     
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